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mdf skirting which jigsaw blade

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micks

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i was trying to cut some mdf skirting board 69mm wide x 14mm thick at 45degree mitre, not having a suitable mitre block to hand.

saw in a book that a jigsaw could be used with baseplate set to 45degrees,and running the jigsaw base against a guide battern to cut skirting.

my b&decker jigsaw has variable speeds so tried with short metal cutting blade,but this seemed to overheat and the jigsaw blade wandered, then tried with 14tpi coarse blade with not better results regardless of speed/feed rate settings.

so tried with softwood offcut blade set vertical blade still wandered?? so not sure if better /differant quality blades would give better results.

thank you
 

Howjoe

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I'd guess that the base plate doesn't have enough of a surface on the skirting to steady itself? You could make a make-shift surface level with either side of the skirting to give the JS more of a run up to the mitre cut. I can't recall what blade I used when I cut mdf skirting with a JS - It was on the faster setting, tho.

For external corners I always use a compound mitre chop saw - the internal corners I cut the end to match the profile of the skirting that it is butting up against.

Hopefully someone with more experience will respond, too.

Cheers

Howard
 

jasonB

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You will have more luck cutting with a handsaw by eye than trying to use the jiggy, the blade will wander no matter what one you use.

Jason
 

shirehorseman

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Hi Micks,
Both Howard & Jason are right in what they're telling you, it is easire quicker and simpler to profile when in an internal corner. As very few corners are vertically true or 90 deg to one another, therein lies the problem. cut approx an 1-2" off one of the skirts and put it on reverse side of board, on the end, profile away from corner and draw around it. now you can cut following the profile line (assuming that your J/S is fitted with an UPCUT blade) most blades are. if you don't feel up to the cutting free hand on the external corners and don't own a powered chop saw. you can get some fairly inexpensive ones at your local d-i-y store like these ones at screwfix.
Hope this helps.
Regards. Trev.

http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/sea/sea ... &x=11&y=13[/b]
 

micks

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thanks all i have not got that much skirting to afix its a few pieces at top of stairwell. external corners ok.

trev i did purchase from b&Q some years back simular though smaller mitre saw for use with large plastic skirting ,but found that the blade would still wander from vertical.

marked profile for internal corners and cut with coping saw, but found it a bit frustrating to have a few attepts before getting profile correct, its my first experience with mdf which does not seem the easiest material to work with.

not sure about upcut blades

thanks all
 

shirehorseman

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Hi Micks,
Most J/S blades are UPCUT, they cut on the upstroke towards the base of the m/chine, that's why if you are cutting something like a worktop, you always cut it from the underside (if using a J/Saw) to avoid any 'chipping-out' on the face of the work. It's the same if you are cutting something out on a kitchen unit (melamine etc) always cut from the side which will not be visible. But you can get blades that have the teeth set whereby they cut on the downstroke.
Regards.
Trev.
 
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