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Making wedges (wood)

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Sandyn

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That's a great way for a circular saw. I just cut them free hand on the bandsaw.
 

D_W

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Safety devices removed for purposes of demonstration, no doubt :rolleyes:
He doesn't need them. He'll stop the wood if it flies. BTDT here in the states when someone got me into woodworking and never mentioned kickbacks.

An Englishman of all things, transplanted to the USA - and who believed safety equipment gets in the way (despite being highly educated and otherwise brilliant).
 

JobandKnock

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I think thst has absolutely nothing to do with where you are from, it's often more to do with formal education as opposed to being self-taught, I find. The issue is one of guarding the blade and keeping your fingers a decent distance away from it (perfectly feasible with this process), something I believe that is emphasised to Union carpenters in the USA in their training as well.

Brilliant or no, logic dictates that the Laws of Physics will invariably overrule the "I've always done it this way and never had an accident" mantra.

That style of jig is well known and has been around for a very long time. Aigner have made a sophisticated (and expensive) adjustable angle jig of that type for more than 30 years, whilst Robert Wearing published a couple of DIY designs (including a nifty variable angle one which utilises planed softwood, a butt hinge and a locking quadrant stay).

Personally, I just cut them out of scrap on a sliding compound mitre saw - or a case of "when all you have is a hammer..."
 
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johnnyb

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I use similar to cut tapered back slats for adirondack chairs. tapered 1/8 each side. works well. I have the fence setting marked on the jig for speed of setting.
 

Rorschach

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Yep I have a very similar jig for my bandsaw (made before I owned a table saw). Always worth having some wedges on hand. I make mine quite thin as you can stack them if needed (or even CA glue them together).
 

Jacob

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Perhaps it's just me that didn't know how to use a table saw for this?
Anyhow, here it is.
Appallingly dangerous without guards and push sticks.
But otherwise just a simple jig as used by many including myself for joinery M&T wedges, on a band saw. Usually the jig knocked up for the occasion in 2 minutes unless I can find the last one I used
 
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pe2dave

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+1 to bandsaw, tried it yesterday.
Niggle. I now want n holders for variety? Those chunky big wedges for in the garden. Slivers for woodworking.
Never seen a variable angle one... though surely length would need to change to match?
 

Rorschach

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+1 to bandsaw, tried it yesterday.
Niggle. I now want n holders for variety? Those chunky big wedges for in the garden. Slivers for woodworking.
Never seen a variable angle one... though surely length would need to change to match?
You would need two pivots to adjust both length and angle. Perfectly possible to make an adjustable jig but far easier to make 2 or 3 different jigs to suit a few standardised sizes of wedge.
I make all mine to one size as my "standard" wedge, it's quite thin, not too long. If I need something different I cut it freehand, once you have established the angle you can run the rest off the fence very easily.
 
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