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Making table top

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hawkeye48

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I am about to make a table top but i'm concerned about movement of all the components against each other.
There will be smallish widths, about 2 to 3 in by 36in long. The main part will have about ten of these with a board running across the end grains.
I know this is a bad setup but cannot think of a way of covering the end grains. The wood will be Oak.
What is the best way to the 2 to 3in widths, T&G, biscuits or some other joint ??. What about the section across the end grains, should this be T&G with glue on the end only to allow a little movement, or biscuits here as well.
 

Jacob

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You don't have to cover the end-grain if you don't want to. That's how most table tops are done. Have a look at some real tables (not pictures in woodwork books or mags).
"Breadboard" ends are quite difficult to do properly, so if you are not sure what you are doing perhaps don't do it.
A simple and effective way to join the boards is to glue them up side by side with no joint system at all.
The most important movement aspect is of the whole top against the structure below. One way or another there needs to scope for movement here - loose "buttons" into slots in the apron being the trad way.
 

hawkeye48

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Jacob":v8bt0i2p said:
You don't have to cover the end-grain if you don't want to. That's how most table tops are done. Have a look at some real tables (not pictures in woodwork books or mags).
"Breadboard" ends are quite difficult to do properly, so if you are not sure what you are doing perhaps don't do it.
A simple and effective way to join the boards is to glue them up side by side with no joint system at all.
The most important movement aspect is of the whole top against the structure below. One way or another there needs to scope for movement here - loose "buttons" into slots in the apron being the trad way.
It will be a table that has pull out half leaves, the closed up size is roughly 3'-0" square (sorry for the feet and ins). The thickness of the top will be 3/4in which i think may cause the top to cup hence my thinking of the breadboard ends.
"One way or another there needs to scope for movement here - loose "buttons" into slots in the apron being the trad ", i believe these are fixing under the top is that correct. If so they will mark the sliding leaves underneath.
 

hawkeye48

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Hi Charlie

Been on a search to find out what buttons are :-? , i have now found out, i have seen them before but did not know what they were called. These will not work on my table and the top and two leave are no fixed in any way to the restr of the table. they just sit on top.
I basically want to make a 3'-0" square of wood 3/4 thick, or maybe 1in for stability.
 

Jacob

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Right. If they aren't fixed to anything then the leaves will need stiffening I guess. But there are designs where the centre board is fixed and the leaves pull out on arms. So no need to stiffen any of them. It's all down to detail design.
I saw an IKEA table with a really neat and simple design for the way the leaves pull out and then come into alignment but I can't remember the details. Pop in to IKEA and have a crawl about under a table or two. No joke, there are some very clever designs there.
 

hawkeye48

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Wish i had known that yesterday, i was ay Ikea, well dragged looking around. Got some ideas for a small lift up tablre for out kitchen.
 
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