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making a planing stop

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thetyreman

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thinking of making a simple square planing stop from a piece of hardwood, what is there to it? just a square hole and a block of oak? I might get one of those cheap metal inlayed ones, anyone made one? :D regards, Ben.
 

Jacob

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thetyreman":2jd2xs58 said:
thinking of making a simple square planing stop from a piece of hardwood, what is there to it? just a square hole and a block of oak?
Yep thats all there is to it. Say 30 to 40 mm square, tight fit, hammer it up from under the bench. Longer the better- it will last longer - just keep trimming bits off if it gets battered.
I might get one of those cheap metal inlayed ones, anyone made one? :D regards, Ben.
Sooner or later you will ding a plane blade into it, or worse! Best avoided.
 

Bm101

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This might or might not help Ben.
Recent thread on the subject. What works for me didn't work for the op. I wouldn't change it personally.
Lift with my foot, it's half the height of the bench, push down to right height. All of 1 second. No bending.
Don't like bending down. :roll:
Mine is not tight fitting both ways . There's a good 5mm gap width wise because that's what I had. Obs. It's a decent fit lengthways where the catch holds it.
loose-planing-stop-fix-t117548.html
Cheers bud.
Chris
 

Bm101

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Also. I tend to agree with Jacob in my very limited experience about keeping metal away from my planes. However, Derek Cohen made what looked like a cracking toothed stop that sat very low from scraps. I'm in the shed so can't link but it will be on his website. Well worth a look.
Cheers.
 

MikeG.

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I used such a stop for years, and I wish I had changed away from it earlier. I now have a couple of different thickness boards with dowels through them, which line up with holes in the bench. This means that wider boards don't pivot around a single point as with the orthodox stops. I can plane a 10" or wider board without regularly shifting its position in relation to the stop.
 

Ttrees

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I do the same for the moment, pity I hadn't a bigger drill bit at the time, as I have 6
closely drilled holes in the end of the bench, and unable to make them much bigger.
I have broken quite a few ash dowels and lost another few, so I suggest to anyone to make the holes around 3/4" sized
or thereabouts, or only slightly smaller keeping it in mind when laying out that you can drill them out larger later on.
 

ED65

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thetyreman":1q97wum3 said:
thinking of making a simple square planing stop from a piece of hardwood, what is there to it? just a square hole and a block of oak? I might get one of those cheap metal inlayed ones, anyone made one? :D regards, Ben.
Is your front vice on the conventional side? If so there are a few options for planing stops presented by Robert Wearing in his books on jigs and appliances that are worth exploring. Each of them is held by the vice in some way and none require any holes be drilled in the bench top if that's something you'd like to avoid, although a row of dog holes inboard of the vice has lots of potential uses.
 

SammyQ

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"I now have a couple of different thickness boards with dowels through them, which line up with holes in the bench. "
MikeG.


Mssrs Wearing, Lloyd... quite a few of the established names have used/published similar devices. You can get 'em with self-camming 'boomerang' legs, 'Lambs' tails' shaped arms, with wedged dowel 'legs'...the design must be a good one, doncherfink??

Sam
 

novocaine

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I have a piece of MDF with another piece screwed to it at 90 degrees to clamp in the face vice. it has 2 dowels at one end to act as a the stop. works great for me and no holes in my bench (which isn't just for wood but everything else where holes are a bad idea, think tiny screws etc.)
 

sunnybob

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Well over 6/10ths of a century ago, my dad had a planing stop that was rested onto a large wooden cam under the bench. there was a handle on the cam and you could start with the wooden stop at bench level, and just by turning the cam handle you could raise the wood any height up to about 2" above the bench.

I've never seen another like it (although to be fair I havent looked all that hard).
 

SammyQ

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"I have a piece of MDF with another piece screwed to it at 90 degrees to clamp in the face vice. it has 2 dowels at one end to act as a the stop. works great for me and no holes in my bench (which isn't just for wood but everything else where holes are a bad idea, think tiny screws etc.)"
"The Resourceful Woodworker", Wearing, pages 13 - 16. Only difference Bob makes over yours AES is to make it 88 degrees, so that the underside sits tight against the bench top.

Sam
 

novocaine

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SammyQ":1dcn3fx8 said:
"I have a piece of MDF with another piece screwed to it at 90 degrees to clamp in the face vice. it has 2 dowels at one end to act as a the stop. works great for me and no holes in my bench (which isn't just for wood but everything else where holes are a bad idea, think tiny screws etc.)"
"The Resourceful Woodworker", Wearing, pages 13 - 16. Only difference Bob makes over yours AES is to make it 88 degrees, so that the underside sits tight against the bench top.

Sam
I never claimed it was an original idea, but thanks for letting me know where I saw it.
My bench has a 3mm piece of MDF over it to protect it from weld spatter, so the face vice sites slightly lower than the bench top most of the time. Has a similar effect.
 

SammyQ

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Gotcha. Don't you just love simple? Too many people create a solution and then try to adapt a problem to it. I'm a firm believer of reducing an idea until only the essential remains. Proper job.

Sam, not a Luddite, no, honestly.
 
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