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Made in England Stanley #4

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ZippityNZ

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Decided to clean up a rusty #4 that I purchased a month ago.

I place the plane bottom and the Lever Cap in an electrolysis bath, and the remaining parts in a EvapoRust bath - both overnight.

The EvapoRust results were amazing. It sure beats using white vinegar.

I noticed that the handle bolt nuts and the Adjusting Nut are made from steel (or is it aluminium) and not brass, as on my other planes.

What era am I looking at with this plane? 1950's?
 

pollys13

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EvapoRust I've used that too, really impressed with it, after using it a 2nd hand Multico head came back like new condition, wasn't expecting that. Quite expensive but can reuse multiple times. Also EvapoRust is non toxic, no nasty chemicals, safe to handle.
 

ZippityNZ

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pollys13":2sq9ziwu said:
EvapoRust I've used that too, really impressed with it, after using it a 2nd hand Multico head came back like new condition, wasn't expecting that. Quite expensive but can reuse multiple times. Also EvapoRust is non toxic, no nasty chemicals, safe to handle.
One of the local auto supply houses had a sale over this past weekend. I was able to get 5 litres of EvapoRust at 30% discount.

Hopefully, it will last me a few planes :)
 

ED65

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ZippityNZ":12li11uj said:
I was able to get 5 litres of EvapoRust at 30% discount.

Hopefully, it will last me a few planes :)
Should do, a gallon is supposed to be capable of absorbing 1/2 pound of rust. Translated into metric I work that out as 5 litres will absorb 300g of rust, which is a fair bit of rust.
 

Dakotapix

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The end results of both electrolysis and EvapoRust are the same in my opinion. Having tried both I prefer EvapoRust because it is simpler to use. I have a gallon jug of EvapoRust that I bought several years ago, have refurbished maybe 20 old planes and would not hesitate to use it for more rust work. Electrolysis requires more setup. Both leave a distinct grey cast on the iron that can be removed with light sanding or polishing.
 

ZippityNZ

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Osvaldd":8sai7yeg said:
So how does it compare to electrolysis?
Like apples and oranges :)

I have only cleaned the small parts in EvapoRust so far. After a night's soaking, they were almost spotless. After a night's electrolysis bath, I normally have to attack each part with a wire wheel on my Dremel. This was not the case with ER.

I guess the real test will be with a plane bottom. I believe that ER will NOT remove the japanning.
 

ED65

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Osvaldd":2okwhyny said:
So how does it compare to electrolysis?
Results can be basically the same, although there are potentially line-of-sight issues with electrolysis that chemical agents aren't subject to. So complex parts or mechanisms are less suited to electrolysis.

Speed on the other hand is highly dependent on a good few variables, something important to remember when comparing results achieved in X time, or how long it took to get from rusty to completely clean. Variables include amperage, the type of power supply, the concentration of the electrolyte, the number or size of the sacrificial electrodes and (rarely mentioned) whether the contact points were cleaned. Not to mention the level of rust there was at the start and how much (if any) of it was brushed/scraped/scrubbed/wire wheeled off beforehand.

Pre-prep is a major factor in quality and speed of results more generally, regardless of the process being used. At the very least wash or solvent degrease first, it can make a huge difference (cutting time by a factor of 10 or more).
 

ED65

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ZippityNZ":3ani6j2h said:
I believe that ER will NOT remove the japanning.
If it's in good shape it'll be unaffected. It can be hard to tell for sure what condition the japanning is in so you find out empirically, it'll either come off or it won't!

In case you don't know, japanning is only seen on earlier planes. With Stanley England tools you're usually or always dealing with a paint of some sort, usually thinner and always much less robust.
 

ZippityNZ

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ED65":2x9zou78 said:
ZippityNZ":2x9zou78 said:
I believe that ER will NOT remove the japanning.
.......In case you don't know, japanning is only seen on earlier planes. With Stanley England tools you're usually or always dealing with a paint of some sort, usually thinner and always much less robust.
Thanks for that information. I wasn't aware that japanning only applied to much older planes.

I have mixed up a concoction of BLO, Turps and Asphaltum with the intention of "japanning" some of my restored planes.

Am I just wasting my time attempting to do so?
 

ZippityNZ

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ED65":3w1tanzn said:
Osvaldd":3w1tanzn said:
So how does it compare to electrolysis?
.....the concentration of the electrolyte, the number or size of the sacrificial electrodes and (rarely mentioned) whether the contact points were cleaned. Not to mention the level of rust there was at the start and how much (if any) of it was brushed/scraped/scrubbed/wire wheeled off beforehand.
Oh how true :)

I made myself a new electrolysis bath over the weekend using 4 lengths of rebar, daisy chained and connected to my 4 amp car battery charger which I had used previously on a 10 litre bath.

I couldn't figure out why I wasn't get a lot of action in the bath. I had failed to clean the contact area on the bars to ensure a good electrical contact. An overnight soaking of the bars in EvapoRust and a thorough cleaning on the wire wheel on my bench grinder worked miracles.

Thanks for the "heads up". Very much appreciated :)
 

ED65

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ZippityNZ":3jmsb3du said:
I have mixed up a concoction of BLO, Turps and Asphaltum with the intention of "japanning" some of my restored planes.

Am I just wasting my time attempting to do so?
It's totally up to you, if you want to use japanning go for it.

We can get into whether real japanning is worth it aesthetically or materially in a future thread but the bottom line is they're your tools and you can do whatever you like to them. Paint 'em pastel green, yellow or pink (all real-world examples in case you haven't seen the photos!) if one of those options takes your fancy :-D
 
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