• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Logging On - From Ash to Ashes (eventually)

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Yojevol

Clocking on
Joined
29 Jan 2017
Messages
695
Reaction score
155
Location
Cheltenham
Recently had a largish ash tree felled. It was overhanging my workshop and, more importantly, the road. I was worried that it would be difficult to deal with if it became 'die back' infected. Our local tree surgeon advised that it would be a good investment as felling an infected tree would need a cherry picked and therefore double the price.
The deal was that he would bring it down and leave it in handleable lumps for me to process into firewood. The largest trunk (there were 4) would be left for milling into slabs.
Here is the pile of logs curtesy of my electric chainsaw:-

20210226_121312.jpg


Next with my new toy:-

20210216_122522 (1).jpg


split into useful sizes:-

20210227_153203.jpg


This is the log for milling, it's about 9' long and 12"dia:-

20210227_153227.jpg


And the log pile all neatly stacked on the north side of my workshop:-

20210302_123717.jpg


Should be ready for burning next winter but will probably be used in 2 years as I have apple and maple coming along as well.

Brian
 

Yojevol

Clocking on
Joined
29 Jan 2017
Messages
695
Reaction score
155
Location
Cheltenham
Nice pile of logs (y)buy or make a stand for your new toy ;) your back will thank you :love:
The splitter came with a stand but I decided not to use it because it meant lifting the larger logs which cwould have done my back in. I did the whole job in several sessions, stopping when my lower back started complaining of lack of tea/coffee.
 

shed9

establiSHED member
Joined
3 Nov 2013
Messages
1,573
Reaction score
206
Location
In a forest in Wales
Had a large Ash taken down myself about two to three months back, same approach in that the smaller limbs are destined for firewood and longer trunk body parts will be milled down. I have a Woodland Mills 130 so can fortunately do the milling myself. Have another six very large trees to come down in the next few weeks which ironically are not all Ash but a mix of Ash and Oak which have become dependent on each others weight bearing loads. The remaining trees are all road side so I'm having to have traffic control (council) and cherry pickers. I'm using professionals clearly for the clear fact they are professionals and the associated insurance. If they were not so close to the road, I'd be doing it myself. I'm dreading the quote when it comes back, likely to be at least a weeks work I suspect - should be offset slightly by the available firewood and slabs mind.
 

Sgian Dubh

Established Member
Joined
12 Oct 2004
Messages
2,341
Reaction score
195
Location
UK
And the log pile all neatly stacked on the north side of my workshop:-
Brian, have you stacked wet logs against that wall before? I ask because I'm aware of cases where wood stacked against or near to a wall for drying - milled and stickered up boards, not logs destined for burning, that have lead to dampness getting into the building.

I ask in case that is a first use of that wall for that purpose, and the potential moisture ingress might be something to watch for. Slainte.
 

Yojevol

Clocking on
Joined
29 Jan 2017
Messages
695
Reaction score
155
Location
Cheltenham
Brian, have you stacked wet logs against that wall before? I ask because I'm aware of cases where wood stacked against or near to a wall for drying - milled and stickered up boards, not logs destined for burning, that have lead to dampness getting into the building.

I ask in case that is a first use of that wall for that purpose, and the potential moisture ingress might be something to watch for. Slainte.
I've been stacking logs there for a few years now without any problem. You can see the last remnants of an elm pile on the left of the photo. The only problem is with the logs. They tend to dry on the exposed ends first, as you would expect. This leads to shrinkage of the outer ends in preference to the inner ends. This can cause the whole pile to 'peel' away from the wall, so restacking may be needed.
I have had water ingress from prevailing winds on the south side which has lead me to clad the whole wall with fibre shingles. All the windows are now replaced with plastic frames. Now that the ash tree has gone I may have to think about cladding the SW facing gable end which is now more exposed.
Brian
 

Sgian Dubh

Established Member
Joined
12 Oct 2004
Messages
2,341
Reaction score
195
Location
UK
I've been stacking logs there for a few years now without any problem.
Ah, my concerns are allayed - it was just a thought. More rapid shrinkage of the outer ends of the logs isn't surprising. It's a slight shame that you haven't got an open ended shed that allows the wind to pass right through the stack, but obviously that's not the end of the world. Slainte.
 
Top