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Loft Conversion - Chipboard

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Noel

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Just about woodworking....
Just started converting our loft, wiring and insulation done, now laying the floor. Couple of questions:
Laid one 8 x 2 sheet of 18mm chipboard using 4 x 50 screws. just a thought but are there specialist chipboard or flooring screws which would be more suitable? Can't see a lot wrong with what I'm using but....
Plan to stagger the boards and cut to meet over a joist. Is it worth attaching batons to make a wider base for a joint rather than screwing to the edge of the chipboard.
Here's picture:

Any other comments or suggestions most welcome.

Rgds

Noel
 

ike

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Hi Noel,

Did mine last year but used the smaller T&G "loft pack" boards. I didn't add battens to side of joist but skewed screws in a bit to keep from breaking out end of board. No problems then and seems fine since i.e. no creaking.

Used bogo Screwfix Gold screws.

cheers

Ike
 

Signal

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Noely,

I recently put a new floor in the workshop using chip boards.

Tryed to meet over a joist where and when I could but if not just stuck a couple of noggins in to support the joint.

As for screws just used run of the mill chipboard screws and piloted first.
Layed a line of boards, pulled them up tight with the band type flooring clamps. Then squeezed them upto the wall and held them in place with an F Clamp across the joist pushing against the board.

Once nice and tight ran around drilling the pilot holes while some one else followed me with the screws.

Only other advice I could make is to get some of them knee pad things, I was aching all over afterwards from all the crawling about, ohhh me poor old knees :lol:

Now you probably all ready know this but just in case, or if im talking complete gibberish, like normal that is :wink:

Are you rafters 2x3's? if so I think you may need to do something with them cos Im sure they need to be 2x4's. Dont tkae this for gospel from me cos I know nowt about much and even less about a lot.

Signal
 

Noel

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Thanks Signal & Ike. Yes, have knee pads, great job. Screws are skewed at the board ends. Had thought of noggins and they will provide additional rigidity.
Signal, joists are 8" x 2" approx, and have been passed by my very friendly Building Control officer. When we built the house used the biggest trusses we could find as the conversion was always somewhere in the future. Have 1,000 sq ft to do before Christmas. I did inquire which particular christmas......

Rgds

Noel
 

ike

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Hot and sticky enough for you then? :lol:
 

Signal

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LOL, got that one covered then noely, 8x2 wow you could stash a few elephants up there :lol:

1000 sq feet, pipper me I was nearly dead after doing the workshop :oops:

Signal
 

Noel

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Hot and sticky? Thinking of putting a sign outside the house advertising a sauna...

Rgds

Noel
 

Aragorn

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T&G chipboard flooring doesn't need its ends to be supported on joists. Just slot the next board in to the T&G with a bit of glue. The offcut from the first row becomes the starting piece for the next etc - so very minimal wastage.
Normal woodscrews are fine.
Good luck!
 

Offcut

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Don't bother with the noggins covering the floor joints where they don't meet a joist. The tounge and groove of the ajacent boards supports it. It is the same principal as laying a hardwood floor. You only use noggins if it is plain end boards. Use the end cut of each row to start the next row and you will have no waistage and also remeber to glue each joint. Saves on the squeeks and creeks
The noggins can be a pain when you try to run some additional cable under the floor at a later date.

Andy
 

Signal

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Offcut, horses for courses I suppose but I certainly wouldnt of done with out noggins in the workshop, wouldnt be happy with just the tongue holding up a lump of cast iron :(

Signal
 

Offcut

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I thought this was a loft conversion??
Noely are you going to use the loft as a work shop - probably not the best idea. All that dust "cough cough"

Signal, I wouldn't have used chipboard for a workshop floor - but if I had to; then your right, double support is the only way to go.

Andy
 
A

Anonymous

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Noely

I tried a loft conversion a few years ago and came up fowl of the law. I was told by an expert that one needs special ceilings on the bedrooms etc below the loft is one intends to use the loft as a room due to the lack of fire escape (no windows and one entry point).

Apparently the new plasterboard replacement has to retard fire for 3 hours which standard plasterboard is not

I don't know if this is 100% right and I may be misquoting the person that originally told me but thought it was worth a mention.

I didn't continue with my conversion as it would cost too much to comply with fire regs
 

ike

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Tony said,

I was told by an expert that one needs special ceilings on the bedrooms etc below the loft is one intends to use the loft as a room
I had the notion that this is where the loft coversion is classed as a "habitable" room i.e. a bedroom, but isn't required if it's for use otherwise e.g. a den, chillout zone, ... or maybe a ... woodwork shop! :shock: :D

Ike
 

Signal

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Offcut, I merely mentioned the workshop as I have just finshed mine and was relaying my experiences with chip flooring.

Why not chipboard for a workshop floor by the way?

Signal
 

Noel

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Thanks for all the comments.
Plans are for new office, playroom (for the kids...) and big bedroom.
The 8 x 2 sheets have only T & G on the long side and I don't fancy a springy joint between joists.
Tony, think your mate was slightly ill-informed regarding the fire proofing on the lower ceilings. It's certainly not a regulation overhere. Current regs stipulate / recommend Celotex R foil backed board for the loft ceilings for insulation but no reference is made to "anti fire" material.
Although I have two gable windows I have to convert one of them to a fire escape type even although there will be two stairways available.

Rgds

Noel
 

DAZB

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Tony, it's normal practice for compliance with the Fire Regs to fix 2 skins of 12.5mm plasterboard and then a skim coat of 3mm plaster and seal all the perimeter of the ceiling with a fire retardent sealant which is designed to give at least 1/2 an hour protection and in most cases that is enough time to escape or be rescued. It is also possible to use plasterboards that are specifically rated to withstand a fire for a given period of time ( can't remember exactly but again I think it is 1/2 an hour ) Gyproc do a product called Gyproc Fireline or FireLine Duplex which is coloured pink
and also Gyproc CoreBoard which is green and is 19mm thick.
 
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noely are you just boarding straight on the ceiling joists for down stairs ?
 

Shady

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Noely: I'm sure you're aware, but are you using carcass screws with a plain shank on the 'top third' - gives you a 'clamping' effect as you bed them in, as opposed to modern screws that are threaded the entire length, so don't draw the stuff together: best value I've found is to buy by the 1000 from screwfix...

This is one of those applications where the trad methods have their advantages...
 

tx2man

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My conversion starts monday week,
scaffolding all round, 3 steel flitch beams, fire escapes,
1/2 hour fire everything, hardwire smoke alarms,
numerous visits from build. control, vast amounts of money,
3 weeks of disruption and......a workshop full of bags and boxes :cry:

TX

ps; Plywood sub-floor with lam. wood floor on top.

pps; mind you, it is a designated bedroom
 
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