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Liquid metal

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graduate_owner

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I am not sure if liquid steel is the correct title here. I want to make a faceplate for my wood lathe, the thread being 1 1/4" x 9 tpi left hand. I have a set of taps and have used them to make a thread fitting out of hardwood but was wondering if I could make some out of metal. To that end I was wondering if there is a product that could be packed around a tap and allowed to garden to give the correct thread when the tap is withdrawn, something like epoxy resin but perhaps stronger and cheaper. Possible a fibre glass type product?
I have a spare headstock spindle for the lathe, so I was thinking along the lines of-

Put a release agent on the tap and pack the product around the tap and leave to set to create a 'blank'
Remove the tap and fit the blank to the spare headstock spindle
Mount the spindle in my metal lathe (I have a colchester master mk2, but not the skills to cut an internal left hand thread from scratch) and turn the blank to make a facelpate 'backplate'
Mount a disk to this backplate, drill and hey presto - a faceplate.

But - is there such a product to be had? Would glass fibre be strong enough for a faceplate backplate? Is there anything else that would work better? Or is my whole idea completely flawed?

Any suggestions would be appreciated - I don't mind criticism = if it is a daft idea then fine - say so.

Thanks

K
 

TFrench

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If you have the lathe and the time, have a go at cutting the thread. Even practice a couple of times in timber to make sure you're dialled in properly? There's no way I'd trust an epoxied on faceplate with something out of balance.
 

Robbo3

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I doubt you would be able to remove the tap once the product had set because it will fill up the flutes of the tap.
 

dannyr

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I agree with the above answers, but while on the topic I'd like to know people's opinion on the best epoxy for repair of a chipped casting - cosmetic really (part of a vice casting - cast iron) before painting.

Cosmetic but I'd like it to be best poss (I know I could weld or braze fill but this is not a structural crack, just a couple of small bits knocked off in a long life, and anything with serious heat and cast iron could easily cause more damage).

Are the epoxies called 'steel' etc any better than usual araldite or even pounland two part epoxy glue?
 

Droogs

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JB weld, Ive used it on car parts many times over the years and it is still available. You can also file it nicely once dry before painting
 

graduate_owner

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Those replies are basically what I had expected. Thanks guys. As an interim step I might try just tapping a thread in an aluminium blank - I have all 3 taps. I suspect my biceps might notice the difference before and after though. And as for tapping into a steel blank - well, I shall not even try.
 

pcb1962

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I agree with the above answers, but while on the topic I'd like to know people's opinion on the best epoxy for repair of a chipped casting - cosmetic really (part of a vice casting - cast iron) before painting.
Isopon P38 is perfect for the job
 

Alpha-Dave

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Honestly it sounds like a terrible idea to me, the thread between the spindle and faceplates is subject to significant forces when there is a catch (and even just during general turning), epoxy or any adhesive will just fracture and you will have a flying, heavy lump to deal with.

I would either:
1) buy a nut or two (looks like you want BSF 1 1/4 9TPI left handed; a quick google shows several suppliers), and build a wooden face plate around that.
2) use your metal lathe to bore to the correct inner size, and then use your tap to cut a thread. Not easy, but I have tried with m33 and is possible with a long enough handles on a tap wrench.
3) most ideal, use your metal lathe to cut the thread.
4) pay someone else to use a metal lathe to cut the thread.

Good luck, and please let us know how it goes
 

TFrench

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I've tapped the whitworth one for my wadkin nose in ally. Not fun. Next time I'll definitely be single pointing it!
 

wallace

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with regard to filling cast I use aluminium body filler. Its like car bodge but alot denser. It sands nicely as well
 

graduate_owner

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I was also thinking of making up a wooden / plywood backplate to use as a disk sander. I was going to cut a thread using the taps, in some oak or maple, ans screw / glue to the ply disc, then true it up on the lathe. Would CA glue be a good idea to strengthen the threaded part after cutting? This is not really a metalworking question though.
Regarding cutting threads on the colchester, I have had some difficulty with multiple starts, I think because of a loose carriage. I have now tightened the gibs and it is much better so I will try thread cutting again - starting with external right hand threads to get some competence, hopefully.

Perhaps I should start a new post regarding this thread cutting.

K
 

Jelly

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I've tapped the whitworth one for my wadkin nose in ally. Not fun. Next time I'll definitely be single pointing it!
Based on your post history I'd have fully expected you to use such a job as an excuse to acquire a self reversing tapping head for your Radial Arm Drill! :p

(If you do happen across one, you should aquire it, they're great!)
 

TFrench

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Based on your post history I'd have fully expected you to use such a job as an excuse to acquire a self reversing tapping head for your Radial Arm Drill! :p

(If you do happen across one, you should aquire it, they're great!)
The wadkin nose thread is 1 3/8" BSW, not sure theres an auto reversing head that'll handle that! I've got a couple of good tapmatics in the collection, just waiting a job with lots of little tapped holes. In the "awaiting attention" pile are two larger pollard heads but they both need bits remaking for the collet holders. Just in case you were worried I'd missed an oppurtunity to buy stuff :LOL: Most of my jobs are one offs though so I tend to either power tap with a drill chuck or by hand with a spring follower.
 

Jelly

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The wadkin nose thread is 1 3/8" BSW, not sure theres an auto reversing head that'll handle that!
There is such a thing!

I know this only because a friend of mine has one which fits the MT5 spindle of his ancient Radial Arm Drill, came with the drill when he bought it from the dealer who imported it from Ukraine.

I've used it to power tap 2" and 3" BSPP holes, and it's pretty nifty, the down rotation passes through a planetary gearbox which helps provide torque, whilst up rotation is substantially faster at spindle speed,

Apparently there's a method to switch between LH & RH threads too, although that requires partial disassembly to switch.

I'm reliably informed that the biggest downside is that it doesn't have adjustable torque and can easily snap a ½ or ⅝ BSW tap rather than reversing which limits it's utility somewhat.

When I'm next able to visit him again I'll try to get pictures!
 

Mike Jordan

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Not quite the answer perhaps but if you have an expanding chuck face plates are easy. This is my disc sander, just a piece of 18mm ply faced with Velcro.
It's a nasty Chinese lathe but gets a lot of use.
image.jpeg
 

Robbo3

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Not quite the answer perhaps but if you have an expanding chuck face plates are easy. This is my disc sander, just a piece of 18mm ply faced with Velcro.
It's a nasty Chinese lathe but gets a lot of use.
As you say an expanding chuck I presume there is a recess rather than a tenon.
I suspect the OP is trying to get the cheapest solution but if he has a chuck perhaps a faceplate ring?
 
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