Linseed oil and linseed oil paint

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Jacob

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Paint job finished.
This was the last of them and the worst, being a bit inaccessible.
But it wasn't too bad. Didn't look very bright but everything in good order bar a bit of mastic and an inch or so of putty.
10 years or more since painted last after installation.
10no of these @ 14' . 6no at 6' . One round one.
The whole job took about 3/4 litre of Allback paint. No undercoat beyond a bit of raw linseed on some bare patches.
In other words very cheap, no problems and a great relief. Should see me out!

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Sitting scaffold on tile roof - old mattress free from Facebook - not bad nick, no p*ss stains, could be a keeper!
Sheet of cheap 1/2" ply.
No breakages!

IMG_4770.JPG
 
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davethebb

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Nice. I have been using burnt sand mastic for years, i hate modern synthetic sealants.
Do you have any tips for me? I have a very old property and will be resealing the windows and doors to the brick work and want to try and use burnt sand and linseed oil.
 

Jacob

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I have just read this thread and thought the document reference below might be of interest.

Interesting about how paint fails and I've seen it often - waterlogged wood under pristine paint surface. Still blames the wood for paint failures. I blame the paint (alkyd) and my experience so far confirms this. Wood is just as good as it ever was OTBE.
He's quite wrong about linseed oil paints being difficult to apply and labour intensive - quite the opposite it couldn't be easier, unless you make the mistake of trying to lay it on thick like alkyd paints, in which case it will run and skin over.
Also they don't have a tendency to skin in the can if you do the normal thing of shaking the tin after putting the lid on. In fact they have very long shelf life but will need a good stir if left for a year or more - I use a cheapo kitchen hand blender.
Using linseed paint is very different and if not appreciated then you will have problems.
I've never heard of burnt sand mastic! Sounds unusable anyway as it can't be painted?
Haven't had the mildew effect except once on a door but it was easy to wash off and looked good.
After 5 or more years linseed paint may look a bit dull or faded ("chalky") but the wood underneath will be in perfect condition and any minor failures easily remedied - putty being the most likely.
P.S. He's also wrong about "microporous" paints. It's just a sales slogan. All paints are "microporous" until you get to extremes using bitumen, gold leaf etc.
 
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pgrbff

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In fact they have very long shelf life but will need a good stir if left for a year or more - I use a cheapo kitchen hand blender.
Whilst I agree generally with the rest of your post, in my experience, and I do tend to buy small, 500ml tins, even without added driers the linseed oil paint I buy skins over very quickly unless you manage to exclude the oxygen. You can lose quite a lot of the tin.
 

Jacob

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Whilst I agree generally with the rest of your post, in my experience, and I do tend to buy small, 500ml tins, even without added driers the linseed oil paint I buy skins over very quickly unless you manage to exclude the oxygen. You can lose quite a lot of the tin.
Not my experience at all. I exclude the oxygen by putting the lid back on tight - which also meant taking it off carefully in the first place to not damage the edge. Then shake it up to paint the seal inside.
 
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TRITON

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Some info here

I know this chap, I used to work at his cabinet-shop making arts&crafts furniture.
eg; Here's a nice big set of garage doors i made while there. Painted of course with the linseed oil paint.
garage-door-brechany-web.jpg
 
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Jacob

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Some info here

I know this chap, I used to work at his cabinet-shop making arts&crafts furniture.
eg; Here's a nice big set of garage doors i made while there. Painted of course with the linseed oil paint.
View attachment 138686
Is he still at it? I've emailed a couple of times with no reply and the web site is unchanged over a very long period.
How was the paint?
 

TRITON

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Is he still at it? I've emailed a couple of times with no reply and the web site is unchanged over a very long period.
How was the paint?
Ross applied it. I just do the chopping of the wood bit.

He's quite into these type of things, researches the hell out of it, and i remember he bought one of those vibration paint mixing things, so far as im aware he still sells the paint.

It's only occasionally I run into him these days, but next time i do, and god knows when that will be, I'll try to remember to ask him if the company is still operating.

Try the phone number at the bottom of the link page. Thats his home addy, so will be the number. You might have to either wait ages for him to answer or if it goes to message leave something that sounds enthusiastic :LOL:
 

pgrbff

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Not my experience at all. I exclude the oxygen by putting the lid back on tight - which also meant taking it off carefully in the first place to not damage the edge. Then shake it up to paint the seal inside.
If the tin is half empty there is plenty of oxygen to start it setting up.
 

Jacob

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If the tin is half empty there is plenty of oxygen to start it setting up.
Not enough if the tin is well sealed. Even if there was, once it's skinned over the rest of it stays liquid.
I've been using it for about 12 years now and not had a problem.
 

pgrbff

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Not enough if the tin is well sealed.
The chemistry I studied at degree level tells me otherwise, as does my past experience, but I use a different product.
I also open tins carefully, cleaning both meeting faces with a lint free cloth before I start work.
That is why these are available. I have never used them, but might have saved a lot of money if I had.
 

Jacob

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The chemistry I studied at degree level tells me otherwise, as does my past experience, but I use a different product.
....
Well there you have it!
I've only used Allback.
Obviously it won't last forever but it does have a very long shelf life even after it's been opened (and well closed again).
The chemistry you studied at degree level should enable you to work out the volume of air required to oxidise a litre - you may be surprised!
 

pgrbff

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Do you have any tips for me? I have a very old property and will be resealing the windows and doors to the brick work and want to try and use burnt sand and linseed oil.
I only have a phone with me at the moment, I'm away from home. I never did it for a living but was taught by a plasterer who worked for Historic Scotland and taught in the States too. As soon as I have a slightly bigger keyboard I'll put pen to paper. I bought, still buy, my burnt sand from Masonsmortar in Edinburgh. They may also have some info on their website.
 

TRITON

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When using danish oil, i used to decant what was left into a smaller container till it reached the very top. then a bit of cling film on that touching the finish and screwed on a lid. Lasted for ages
 
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woodieallen

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And now I'm proper confused 😕 !

I've used linseed oil paint on my porch and it was definitely easy to apply, BUT I've needed to clean and re apply in less than 5 years and now, about 2 years further on, it's faded and most annoyingly, mould keeps appearing.

Any advice on getting rid of the mould very very welcome!!
Blackfriar's Anti-mould. Then get some Zinser Cover Stain to seal it all in and apply a proper paint of your own choice. That is exactly what I did and very glad too. No mould.
 

woodieallen

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I only have a phone with me at the moment, I'm away from home. I never did it for a living but was taught by a plasterer who worked for Historic Scotland and taught in the States too. As soon as I have a slightly bigger keyboard I'll put pen to paper. I bought, still buy, my burnt sand from Masonsmortar in Edinburgh. They may also have some info on their website.
Yup...Mason's Mortar have an excellent website with a lot of information. It's very easy to apply but be prepared for some birds to take a linking to it.
 

woodieallen

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Interesting about how paint fails and I've seen it often - waterlogged wood under pristine paint surface. Still blames the wood for paint failures. I blame the paint (alkyd) and my experience so far confirms this. Wood is just as good as it ever was OTBE.
He's quite wrong about linseed oil paints being difficult to apply and labour intensive - quite the opposite it couldn't be easier, unless you make the mistake of trying to lay it on thick like alkyd paints, in which case it will run and skin over.
Also they don't have a tendency to skin in the can if you do the normal thing of shaking the tin after putting the lid on. In fact they have very long shelf life but will need a good stir if left for a year or more - I use a cheapo kitchen hand blender.
Using linseed paint is very different and if not appreciated then you will have problems.
I've never heard of burnt sand mastic! Sounds unusable anyway as it can't be painted?
Haven't had the mildew effect except once on a door but it was easy to wash off and looked good.
After 5 or more years linseed paint may look a bit dull or faded ("chalky") but the wood underneath will be in perfect condition and any minor failures easily remedied - putty being the most likely.
P.S. He's also wrong about "microporous" paints. It's just a sales slogan. All paints are "microporous" until you get to extremes using bitumen, gold leaf etc.
Jacob, as you're such an expert on everything, when are we going to see your fund of knowledge made available ?

@davethebb...excellent article and thanks for linking to it. Refreshing to read something from someone who knows what they are talking about.
 
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