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Leigh dt jig on ebay

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tim

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Did anyone here win this?

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=8177942204&fromMakeTrack=true

I didn't bid but was just watching with a cup of coffee to see if anyone would snipe this. Sure enough at the last nano second the winning bid arrived beating the previous bid of £215.

I had a ceiling of £240 in my mind but couldn't get a response from the seller about whether it was metric or imperial., hence no entry and in any case wouldn't have mattered would it!

However, what was most instructive to me was that it seems having watched a few bids recently that the way ahead is to get sniping software, enter your max bid and go do something else!

Cheers

T
 
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Anonymous

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Assuming that the Leigh was standard without any additional templates, that's a fair saving fo someone

I don't really like to try buying from ebay, especially as the use of snipers has grown recently. However, I think sellers are doing very well indeed out of the sniping fraternity :lol:

I did sell a few items a while back and was very satisifed with the cash that came in :wink:

Bought myself a few nice toys with it - although not from ebay :wink:
 

RogerS

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I don't see how sniping software works better than entering the maximum that you're prepared to pay for something about 30 minutes or so before the auction closes. eBay software will beat any sniping software. Or am I missing something?

Tim, save your money for that WoodRat :wink:

Roger
 

tim

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I don't see how sniping software works better than entering the maximum that you're prepared to pay for something about 30 minutes or so before the auction closes. eBay software will beat any sniping software. Or am I missing something?
I would have thought so too but then why would people use snipe software. I read the other thread a couple of days ago which explained some of it


Tim, save your money for that WoodRat :wink:
Have you got yours working yet?

BTW turns out the jig was imperial - response very much along the lines of 'not sure, imperial I think' which makes me wonder how or why he got the jig in the first place

T
 

Chris Knight

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Tim,

I am pretty sure the only metric thing about the Leigh is the scale on the template. The cutter sets are the same. As the scale refers only to thickness of wood in use and as it is pretty approximate anyway in terms of its practical use, I don't think you would be disadvantaged by a jig with imperial scales on its templates.

I have imperial scales but as I work in both metric and imperial it is no bother but I honestly can't see it really effecting someone who works mainly in metric. The joint widths etc are infinitely variable anyway.
 

Martin Brown

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If it is a big problem you can buy either scales later on from any BriMarc retailer. Any missing bits (hey its ebay.......) are also available as spares.

Keith Birkett is our Leigh expert. If in doubt give him a call.

Martin
 

Aragorn

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Martin Brown":48xr5zqo said:
Keith Birkett is our Leigh expert. If in doubt give him a call.
Don't suppose he'd come and do some inlaid dovetails for me...? :wink: :D
 

RogerS

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Yes...apparently the button bar comes oversize and it's down to the user to adjust it to fit to the 'tightness' that they are comfortable with. They're sending me a Button Bar so that I can adjust it to meet my preferred fit.

Roger
 

Martin Brown

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To have Keith visit would be possible however it would be better that you came to us so that when you are perfect you can give a demo to all our colleagues. We would not charge for this and we have loads of wood to play with.


Seriously how can we help? We do offer training at BriMarc.

Martin (and Keith currently in Scotland)
 

Jake

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The aim of sniping is to avoid bidding wars. People get "auction fever" - just look at any finished auction and you'll see people (whether the winner or a loser) who enter 10.00, don't beat the highest bid, try 12.55, fail, realise they would pay 13.55 for it, fail, bid 21 in frustration still don't win and put in 55 to make sure they really seal it.

Most bidders are in fact like this. Say you want to win the thing and are willing to pay £22.50. If you put that bid in half an hour before auction end, these people will nibble away trying to beat your max bid, and may exceed it.

If you don't bid until the last minute, those people fight among themselves on their own irrationally low level (by which I mean they are not focusing on what they ultimately are willing to pay, but rather by the price on the screen at the moment). Eventually A will beat B by 25p, at about 16.25. B will think "ah, I'll wait to the last 30 seconds". A thinks he's won and leaves his max bid at the 16.25. B steps back in the last 30 seconds but is focused on A as the competition rather than thinking "oh actually I think this is worth 25". So B bids 16.77 and outbids A 30 seconds before auction end. The snipe with a max of 22 then goes in, beating B's bid and not giving him a chance to either react by bidding his true maximum, or to get involved in another emotive bidding war with the sniper, where B may do the other classic thing, which is to forget the true value of the thing and over-bid in a desire to "win".

There are two advantages - it increases your chance of winning (by removing the opportunity to wake up from the people who can't name or won't bid their true price at the start) and it also stops people who chip away at your bid. If you put your bid in 30 minutes before you will get people who think I'll bid 16, oh well, 18 is only a couple of pounds more, well lets try 20.79 because you're bound to have bid just over 20, etc. By doing that, even if they never exceed your max bid, they put up the price you have to pay.

Anyone who thinks snipers benefit sellers is either not understanding the mechanics, or is confusing the two issues of (a) whether people are willing to bid more than seems "reasonable" and (b) when they place that bid.
 
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Anonymous

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i am a self confessed snipe bidder and i used to put in a high bid a day or so before but you nearly always get outbid so now i wait untill the last 30 secs and put in a fair price and 8x out of 10 i win and get a bargain in the process like my bostitch nail gun £45 brand new or my freud biscuit jointer again £45.

Cheers,
Derek.
 
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Anonymous

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Jake":1si7hpqp said:
Anyone who thinks snipers benefit sellers is either not understanding the mechanics, or is confusing the two issues of (a) whether people are willing to bid more than seems "reasonable" and (b) when they place that bid.
I take it you mean me as I made that very point earlier in this thread :wink:

ohh, I am so old and senile now that I clearly don't expect to begin to understand the mechanics of sniping :lol: let alone not be confused by such a complex idea :roll: :lol: :lol: :wink:

Jake, I think that your view of the bidders' psychology is over simplistic and I do not agree with your description of how bidding progresses.
In my experience of ebay, snipers benefit the seller. I have been the happy seller on a few occasions when this happened :p :p :p

And a bidder too :cry:
 

Jake

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In my experience of ebay, snipers benefit the seller. I have been the happy seller on a few occasions when this happened
In the sense that, if they are successful, the seller gets more than he thought he was going to get a minute before the auction closed, certainly. However, that doesn't indicate that the price would not have gone yet higher if the sniper had instead put his bid in earlier. Go and look at the record 5 1/2 auction in hand tools.

There is no way that sniping can actually benefit the seller. All the seller gets is another bidder with a different max bid, whether that person snipes or not. The timing can't play in the seller's favour, only in the sniper's (over other bidders).

your view of the bidders' psychology is over simplistic and I do not agree with your description of how bidding progresses.
I'm not sure what to say to that. Of course it was a generalisation. Some people do just stick in a max bid early. Sniping isn't aimed at them, you either win or lose against them. They are annoying as a buyer because they present a target for the nibble-bidders and thereby ramp up the price. But if you don't believe that many many bidders on Ebay 'nibble bid' in the way I described then you're, well, wrong.
 
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Jake

I do believe that bidders nibble in the way you say, but that is my point.

You seem to want them to all bid their maximum and then forget about it. They don't . That is human nature, get what you can for as little as possible. Bid low early on and then raise it a little later if you get outbid.

Clearly many then get carried away with some sort of 'auction fever' and bid higher than they intended. BUT then the sniper bids even higher still - seller wins as they get more money than they would have without snipers.

I suspect (but do not know) that many sniper uses set a price way above what they would when bidding normally, to ensure that they win whilst expecting the bid to remain lower than their max. due to the speed of their bid at the end of the auction (assumption is that they will win before anyone can outbid them)
 

Jake

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I do believe that bidders nibble in the way you say, but that is my point.
We agree!

You seem to want them to all bid their maximum and then forget about it.
Not at all. I am very very happy indeed if they fool themselves that it is like a normal auction house auction and bid accordingly. That means they won't put in their true maximum bid and gives me more chance of sniping it at a price I'm happy with.


They don't . That is human nature, get what you can for as little as possible. Bid low early on and then raise it a little later if you get outbid.
And that is what sniping is about. Reducing the ability/opportunity for people who don't put in their true max bid to actually do so, on seeing that someone else has outbid their "maximum bid that is less than my true maximum bid"

Clearly many then get carried away with some sort of 'auction fever' and bid higher than they intended. BUT then the sniper bids even higher still - seller wins as they get more money than they would have without snipers.
No. The seller gets more than if the sniper wasn't a bidder. If he's bidding more than the others he would have done were he a sniper or not. The bid amount of a snipe has zero to do with its timing. The only thing that timing does is remove (to the seller's disadvantage) the chance for someone else to rebid against the sniper.

I suspect (but do not know) that many sniper uses set a price way above what they would when bidding normally, to ensure that they win whilst expecting the bid to remain lower than their max. due to the speed of their bid at the end of the auction (assumption is that they will win before anyone can outbid them)
Well some people are nuts so anything is possible. If someone is sniping they usually have sufficient understanding of the system to know that time is irrelevant in terms of what the price will end up being within the sniper's max bid. The aim to reduce any further counter-bids being made when the sniper's bid is made. That doesn't mean that you can enter any price you like as the end price depends not on your max bid, but the max bid of the highest losing bidder. If someone bids £1m for something worth £100 retail, 1 sec before auction close, they'd better damn well hope that the then high bidder didn't set his max at £999,999 in an equal act of stupidity.

Cheers, Jake
 
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