Quantcast

Legacy for linier mouldings

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

JFC

Established Member
Joined
30 Sep 2005
Messages
2,180
Reaction score
0
Location
London
Had a builder ask me if i could run him up a part of a cornice he broke during a refurb .

I wasnt quite sure if i could manage it on the router table so i set the Legacy up as i was told it can tackle this kind of job

I think it managed the job very well :D

A quick tidy up with a block plane and a sand down and its done in around 2-3 hours :D

Any other ways of producing this 100mm x 32mm moulding ?
 

Scrit

Established Member
Joined
17 Sep 2002
Messages
3,872
Reaction score
0
Any other ways?

Scratch stock(s) and hollows and rounds or grind a knife set for our spindle moulder. In any case rough the piece out to approximate shape on the table saw first.

Scrit
 

JFC

Established Member
Joined
30 Sep 2005
Messages
2,180
Reaction score
0
Location
London
Wouldnt you need to grind two sets of cutters for the spindle moulder ? I thought the 80mm super block was the biggest you could get , but your probably going to prove me wrong :lol:
Ive not heard of scratch stocks , but they sound fun :D
 

Manny

Established Member
Joined
31 Mar 2004
Messages
152
Reaction score
0
Location
London
The "Legacy" looks usefull where can I get details ?

Just seen the info in the reviews section and the price!!
 

Scrit

Established Member
Joined
17 Sep 2002
Messages
3,872
Reaction score
0
JFC":1ndfqg8y said:
Wouldnt you need to grind two sets of cutters for the spindle moulder ? I thought the 80mm super block was the biggest you could get , but your probably going to prove me wrong :lol:
I've not heard of scratch stocks , but they sound fun :D
In principle, to be legal, yes I would - cutters and limiters (repeated for each block in stacked tooling) - unless you have a throughfeed moulder (and no, I don't). There is, however, a British cutterblock system called the Armadillo which obviates the need to do this and yet provides the necessary limitation feature. It comprises a series of different sized rings bored for locator pins which assemble together into a cutterblock. Sadly I don't have one of those, either - although it is on the wish list. There are also a limited number of thicknessers which allow the use of profile cutters, but they're a bit rare these days.

The biggest cutter blocks I've seen are the 100mm high Whitehill blocks, although if you go to serrated-back blades you can get blocks up to 150mm high (Garniga, etc) - however that takes a really heavy spindle moulder to run (not to mention a considerable amount of operator bravery, I'd say). If I wanted to do this in one pass then I'd consider using stacked tooling: a ready-made block/cutterset to form part of the profile with the "bespoke" bit on a second block above or below that on the spindle. Looking at my own tooling I'd actually prefer to make 3 passes - pass 1: large cove cut, pass 2: ogee-like bit on panel raiser, pass 3: nosing.

For the really technically minded Thermwood (CNC routers) have a software package called eCabinets which allows you to create your own profiles which the CNC then cuts in multiple passes using ball nose and straight cutters. All you need is the cutters - oh, and £90k worth of CNC router.......

And I knew Alf would get in with the scratch stocks reference..... :lol:

Scrit
 

Latest posts

Top