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LEAN-TO wooden conservatory.

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Mc

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Hi, am thinking of designing and building a lean-to conservatory.

I only need one external wall as I have extensions on both side of my garden.

Am interested in any plans, tips, or guidance.

hardwood or softwood ? glass or plastic roof (prefer glass I think)

Or the name of someone who will supply only the components at reasonable cost 9not Baltic Pine..;-)

Can post some approx sizes if it helps.

Any guidance much appreciated.

Mc
 

Bean

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Hi MC and welcome. I know of one other person who did this but he designed his own and used Scan Redwood.
I have built a couple of small greenhouses, the profiles are easy to work out but the joints can be interesting.

I wish you well with your venture.

Bean
 
A

Anonymous

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Hi MC Welcome
If i was building a lean to on my house i would definately have a tiled roof,with at least 6" of insulation between the rafters.
And i would throw in a couple of Velux for natural light.
Ive worked on and in lean to's and conservatorys with glass /plastic roofs and everyone has the same complaint
Too hot in the summer and too cold in the winter

Cheers Steve
 

Adam

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Welcome to the forum.

Screwfix seem to sell reasonably priced conservatories which you can install yourself.
Alternatively, I think Jewsons sell them too - in both Hardwood and uPVC.
A colleague at work constructed one with ease, although some aptitude for DIY helps.

Adam
 

devonwoody

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To MC

You will definately regret glass roofing. In the winter a layer of frost can form (when frosty) underneath glass and then when day warms up it thaws and condensates (drips). Can even condensate ater large swings of changeable temperatures.
We have two conservatories and the triple skin poly never gives this trouble but the glass one is a pain.
 

ike

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I only need one external wall
pologies for eggs etc, but if you haven't already checked with the planning office...

You probably won't be allowed to, and your neighbours would be unlikely to appreciate you 'integrating' your extension with theirs. I suspect the structure must be physically separated from neighbouring structures. Unless the extension is built from fully fire-resistant material, you can't build within 1 metre of a boundary.

Sorry to be negative but worth checking (if you haven't done so already).

cheers

Ike
 

radicalwood

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Hi Mc

Both my conservatory and workshop are from cedar. very good for external woodwork. There are quite a few suppliers around the country. The conservatory roof is made from double layered box polycarb tinted bronze. However it is cold during the winter and sauna hot in the summer, it gets the sun dawn till dusk.

All the best

Neil
 
A

Anonymous

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Our conservatory is HUGE - 15' wide and 18' long, mainly east facing but with a south wall too. Almost 3 walls of windows and polycarb (tri-wall) roof. SWMBO uses it as her art studio. No problems in winter as heating it is easy, but in summer it's WAY too hot on sunny days. The other problem is that the polycarb span is so long that it sags, and the entry door catches on the roof (it's a step-down). Don't use it for long spans - go for wood/metal frame and either tile or glass. Glass in a frame can have blinds fitted to keep excess sun out in summer. Personally I'm in the redwood camp as nothing looks nicer.

Incidentally, in our council area many conservatories aren't considered 'living space' so don't need planning permission (or sometimes even building reg approval). Aren't local gov't rules interesting?
 
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