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Laying Staddle Stones

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El Barto

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Hi all,

Bet Mike can help with this - I've been asked to quote on a softwood carport. The client doesn't know what he wants the posts to rest on so I'm exploring a few different options. The site is currently a pebble/stone driveway; would I be best off digging away the stones and laying small patches of concrete where the posts are going to go for staddle stones/feet/whatever we choose to sit on?

Cheers,

Tom
 

marcros

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Worth having a look at a thread that I started a couple of days ago for a couple of ideas about feet.
 

Bm101

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Wonder if a brick piers and/or low wall would aid longevity. Just preventing bounce back from rain by a foot or two would help.
 

El Barto

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Bm101":38pr2qx9 said:
Wonder if a brick piers and/or low wall would aid longevity. Just preventing bounce back from rain by a foot or two would help.
Not a bad shout. I get the impression they want to keep things as low cost as possible though so that might not work for them :cry:
 

MikeG.

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The thing with oak framing and brick plinths is that you almost never see a post coming to "rest" on masonry in traditional framing, and for good reason. Oak posts almost always sit on a plate (horizontal piece of oak) which retains it's bottom end in place. The only common exceptions are in low grade agricultural outbuildings, and some aisle posts in barns. A post sitting directly on brickwork is effectively flapping about because it's almost impossible to restrain it into position, and, just as bad, puts a point load on the bricks, with nothing to spread the load. I know of at least a couple of garages around here with broken brick plinths, snapped where a post sits directly on it.

Edit..........OK...confusing myself with 2 similar threads on the go. This one isn't an oak frame. Forget the above.
 
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