Lathe chuck -- Axminster vs Vevor

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space.dandy

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I'm looking to buy my first chuck and I'm trying to choose between these two:

  1. Vevor: Vevor 5 jaw set
  2. Axminster: SK100 Clubman set
The SK100 is £94 more expensive (with the current discount) and only comes with a single set of jaws, but has a native 1" 8TPI thread, whereas the Vevor requires an (included) adaptor. Does anyone have any useful advice one way or the other?
 

Eric Roy

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Vevor has a cast iron body while the Axminster is stainless steel.

It all comes down to how much you willing to spend and whether higher quality is worth more to you than the flexibility provided by the extra jaws? It is mostly the case that you get what you pay for!

While I have no personal experience of Vevor, every time I pick up my Axminster chuck I enjoy the investment I made…
 

Lazurus

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I have a few Versachucks and find them brilliant, also with the ability to take different manufacturers jaws (with the correct carriers) means a bigger choice and opens up the second hand market to
 

kinverkid

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I've been using the Axminster precision chuck for twenty years and I glad I made that investment. But, if I had to buy all over again, I would also be looking at the Versachuck that Phil is suggesting.
 

space.dandy

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Vevor has a cast iron body while the Axminster is stainless steel.
The Vevor advert says that it is steel, although it doesn't specify stainless.

It all comes down to how much you willing to spend and whether higher quality is worth more to you than the flexibility provided by the extra jaws? It is mostly the case that you get what you pay for!
It is, to a point. I haven't found any real negative criticism of the Vevor chuck, so the decision seems to be between high quality and higher quality, which is a more difficult decision to make.
 

Eric Roy

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This is an extract from the Vevor description, “Premium Steel Structure: Chuck's body is made of quality cast iron.” - could mean whatever you want it to 😒
 

space.dandy

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This is an extract from the Vevor description, “Premium Steel Structure: Chuck's body is made of quality cast iron.” - could mean whatever you want it to 😒
Thanks. I'd clicked to the '4 sets' option, which has a slightly different description. *sigh*
 

Sideways

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I'd say a good chuck is worth waiting and paying for.
Woodturning is often finished on the lathe so stainless is nice to have to resist splashes, stains etc.
A smoothly finished chuck is much nicer to use than something sharp edged and cheaply made.
A directly threaded chuck may run smoother than a lathe with a thread insert (depends on how well made they are) but being able to change the insert can save a lot of cost if you change your lathe in future. I sold my Record lathe but held onto my second hand Vicmarc chuck as it's a lovely thing and with a new insert I'll still be able to use it.
Over time you will tend to add extra sets of jaws to suit the work you do so it's not just about the chuck.
 
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