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Jacob

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Ha ha. Classic Jacob response which is to never concede, and to always keep ploughing on.

But I'll agree with you that the power feed suggestion is excellent. Push sticks are good too in the right circumstances. Slainte.
Concede what?
The point is, anybody looking at spindle moulding for the first time, but constrained by cash, is going to look at the earlier Whitehill blocks and home made cutters, which make spindle use very cheap - cheaper to kit up than a router and much more versatile. Obviously it rings alarm bells; its deprecated but it's not actually "illegal" for your one man workshop though you could get into trouble with HSE if you have employees, especially over accidents if they happen, quite rightly.
 
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Sgian Dubh

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Concede what?
I'd say it's pretty obvious, and I'm taken aback that you can't see what I'm getting at.

A new user pops up, one that states they're "fairly new to wood working so please bear with me", plus goes on to say, "managed to lay my hands on an old wadkin spindle moulder with a power feed, which I now need to learn to use."

Why would you suggest to someone who admits to limited experience in their opening post a technique which could have devastating consequences in the hands of someone who doesn't know what they're doing? Whilst it's true that later posts from bearwood42 suggest a good awareness of safety issues around machinery in general, but not specifically woodworking, that wasn't apparent from his (her?) opening post, and yet your response was just the second suggestion given prior to bearwood42's subsequent contributions.

The point is, anybody looking at spindle moulding for the first time, but constrained by cash, is going to look at the earlier Whitehill blocks and home made cutters, which make spindle use very cheap - cheaper to kit up than a router and much more versatile. Obviously it rings alarm bells; its deprecated but it's not actually "illegal" for your one man workshop though you could get into trouble with HSE if you have employees, especially over accidents if they happen, quite rightly.
All of the above quotation from your reply to me is irrelevant with regard to the specific point I'm making which is, as even someone as bull-headed as you sometimes are, might be able to appreciate: your initial suggestion was, I believe, irresponsible given as it was to someone who's woodworking skills and ability, especially with machinery, appeared (from their opening question) most likely to be limited at best.

On the other hand, it wouldn't surprise me to find you disagree and that you think I'm being too cautious or nanny-ish ... or something. I expect you to keep up the never concede stance, and to probably offer up some obfuscatory and diversionary waffle. Slainte.
 

Jacob

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I'd say it's pretty obvious, and I'm taken aback that you can't see what I'm getting at.

A new user pops up, one that states they're "fairly new to wood working so please bear with me", plus goes on to say, "managed to lay my hands on an old wadkin spindle moulder with a power feed, which I now need to learn to use."

Why would you suggest to someone who admits to limited experience in their opening post a technique which could have devastating consequences in the hands of someone who doesn't know what they're doing? Whilst it's true that later posts from bearwood42 suggest a good awareness of safety issues around machinery in general, but not specifically woodworking, that wasn't apparent from his (her?) opening post, and yet your response was just the second suggestion given prior to bearwood42's subsequent contributions.


All of the above quotation from your reply to me is irrelevant with regard to the specific point I'm making which is, as even someone as bull-headed as you sometimes are, might be able to appreciate: your initial suggestion was, I believe, irresponsible given as it was to someone who's woodworking skills and ability, especially with machinery, appeared (from their opening question) most likely to be limited at best.

On the other hand, it wouldn't surprise me to find you disagree and that you think I'm being too cautious or nanny-ish ... or something. I expect you to keep up the never concede stance, and to probably offer up some obfuscatory and diversionary waffle. Slainte.
Bearwood is going in at the deep-end already with an ancient Wadkin spindle moulder, a power feed and a plan for some big timbers. I'm not here as a teacher I'm here to chat about what I do or might do. He might decide to lay out several hundred quid on kit for a trial project which might come to nothing. He might want to try something cheaper. Seems sensible to chat about the options, with appropriate safety warnings of course.
In my view a newcomer to a big table saw is at far greater risk - this forum and other sources are crammed with pictures of people doing dangerous things and I often call this out.
It's all about roughly calculated risk - and by now I'm sure he's got the idea!
I learnt to do it from Eric Stephenson's book.
PS In case he hasn't got the idea; hands should never ever be nearer than say 10" to an exposed spinning circular saw or spindle moulder and guarding and power feeds should be in place.
 
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Sgian Dubh

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Bearwood is going in at the deep-end already with an ancient Wadkin spindle moulder, a power feed and a plan for some big timbers. I'm not here as a teacher I'm here to chat about what I do or might do. He might decide to lay out several hundred quid on kit for a trial project which might come to nothing. He might want to try something cheaper. Seems sensible to chat about the options, with appropriate safety warnings of course.
In my view a newcomer to a big table saw is at far greater risk - this forum and other sources are crammed with pictures of people doing dangerous things and I often call this out.
It's all about roughly calculated risk - and by now I'm sure he's got the idea!
I learnt to do it from Eric Stephenson's book.
PS In case he hasn't got the idea; hands should never ever be nearer than say 10" to an exposed spinning circular saw or spindle moulder and guarding and power feeds should be in place.
Okay Jacob. I'll leave you to it because I know you're sure of your rightness. I've voiced my opinion, and you're welcome to ignore or dismiss my point. Slainte.
 

Jacob

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Okay Jacob. I'll leave you to it because I know you're sure of your rightness. I've voiced my opinion, and you're welcome to ignore or dismiss my point. Slainte.
Instead of ranting on tediously and offensively why don't you explain exactly why you think my suggestions are bad?
What exactly are the hazards in your humble opinion?
Try and explain things in a neutral impersonal way; i.e. talk about spindle moulding, not about me.
PS forgot to say; I did loads of spindle moulding, starting off (1986) on a primitive AEG Maxi 26 and progressing to a spectacular SCM 110 with a Maggi Steff power feed. Retired now but do bits on my SCM Lab100 combi spindle and have drawers full of blocks and cutters. I'm fairly experienced on a one-man small workshop level, I do know what I'm talking about, I'm not going to tell anybody to do anything stupid, quite the opposite.
PPS have also done curved ring fence work and the other thing at right angles - curved work in curved jigs etc
 
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Sgian Dubh

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There's no need to patronise, Jacob. For an explanation in a neutral and impersonal manner I refer you to the first post I made in this thread, number 26 on page two. I can't help it that you don't seem able to understand what I was driving at. Slainte.
 

Sgian Dubh

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He hasn't said a single useful thing about spindle moulding.
I didn't intend to make a point about practical spindle moulding. I made a point about a prolific poster, you, suggesting something that has potential to cause injury to someone with unknown experience of using such machines. I'm sorry you don't see what I was getting at, but there it is. Slainte.
 

doctor Bob

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He hasn't said a single useful thing about spindle moulding.
Well lets be fair Jacob, you have only tried to pick arguments since 2004. I'm never convinced you have actually ever done woodwork, I think the hobby is internet baiting. I think you once posted up a ham fisted dovetailed drawer.
 

Sgian Dubh

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But that is what the thread is about.
I don't disagree with that. I was suggesting that in giving advice on a specific technique for creating and mounting cutters on a spindle moulder in this case, that you really should take into account what you can infer about the capabilities of the person that asked the question. I got the strong impression in your first response to this thread that you didn't take on board the limited experience with spindle moulder use expressed by the OP, a member only since September 7, 2021 who by today's date has only seven posts.

I know we are never going to agree here. I've given you my point of view, and you think I'm wrong. That's about all there is to it really. I can't see that there could be anything gained from further discussion on this sub-topic of this thread. I'm out.

None of the above in my posts here means that I think you're wrong on every subject. I think I've developed a fair understanding of your capabilities, experience and knowledge in woodworking, and you frequently give good advice. However, I'm more than happy to leave you to your seemingly never-ending disputes in the off-topic and controversial topics forum. I browse and seldom post in those forums to amuse myself at the feather spitting that goes on there, and you're one of the most entertaining posters to be found in those darker and murkier corners, ha, ha. Slainte.
 

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