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Kitchen island, movable?

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mindthatwhatouch

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Hi all,
Sorry, not many meaningful posts recently as I’ve been rather busy with an extension, now on the kitchen and Wanted to draw on the collective knowledge here regarding the island.

The island is 1800 mm long, standard kitchen units (two drawer units and one cupboard) and will have an overhang on the worktop for seating along one side. Whilst we are happy with the position of the island, it may suit to occasionally move it, bearing this in mind:

1. Do these things need to be fixed to the floor to prevent sliding or tipping over. If it’s not fixed what’s the likelihood of it tipping over? If so would a subframe under the base with say some paving slabs for weight prevent tipping.

2. If we were to put some form of castors on it, is there some clever lifting type available, so that when stationary it sits on its feet and not the wheels. Lift up onto the wheels to move and then lower. Also the castors will be behind a plinth so not visible. Don’t want any ugly locking castors on view, thank you.

Thoughts please guys and girls.
 

--Tom--

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I toyed with a similar idea. You can get heavy duty casters with wind down feet, but the whole structure would need strengthening to be feasible.
 

Terry - Somerset

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You may want to think carefully about castors - they will need clearance from the plinth to allow them to change direction if they are not to be on show.

Assuming:

- the units are 60cm deep
- the plinth inset by 4cm on either side and 1.5cm thick
- the castors need to pivot 8cm inside the plinth (depends on castors)

Then the castors will be only 33cm (60-8-3-16) apart if pushed "lengthways" rather than back and forward. If the floor is a bit wonky and the castors do not turn in parallel, the distance apart could be significantly less.

Not a problem perhaps if the cupboards are lightly loaded with non-breakable and the floor is flat, but ............

As I write this it occurs to me that it may be worth investigating the low profile rollers often used on washing machines etc to make it easier to pull/push them under the worktop!
 

AJB Temple

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It is perfectly possible and I have done it with a big butchers block that is much the same size as your Island but much heavier as the maple block was 6 inches thick.

key points:

Make it very rigid. Use steel brackets to reinforce the leg joints in invisible places. You want seriously rigid if you plan to move it much.
I used double casters (twin wheels) on 6 legs and all of them had full stop locks. This is important.
Have plenty of weight low down to keep the centre of gravity low.
Use good quality casters (thin plastic centres fail quickly). You want the metal components to be 2mm steel.
Do not use plastic brakes. They work. But only for a while.
 

mindthatwhatouch

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Thanks for the replies.
Terry, that was one of my concerns, considering having the back panel all the way to the floor so there is no inset for the plinth.
AJB temple. Ply reinforcement to the cabinet backs to stiffen things up. A welded steel frame underneath with the cabinets six of these.? https://www.castors-online.co.uk/acatal ... ml#SID=192

Pop the plinth off, unlock and move. Just not sure how solid it will feel once locked rather than sitting on feet?
 

mindthatwhatouch

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Although that castor has a wheel brake, apparently need a total lock design.
Stops it swivelling as well as rolling....
 

Ttrees

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What about something like Carl Holmgren's designs?
I made one from metal for a tablesaw and it lifts 210kg with one pump, using about the same force as you would for a foot operated
bicycle pump.
It would make an interesting feature if you designed an unobtrusive timber pedal for the lever like on a toaster (sorry first thing that I could think of)
Watching with interest to see what could be more preferable.
Tom
 
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