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Keeping Warm in the work shop

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Jonzjob

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Melinda, walking boots and socks are the Bs kneeze!

I used to stand on the side of 600 foot high hills in 30 mph winds at sub zero temps all for my hobby of flying radio controlled gliders on the outskirts of Stroud. Chas will be able to tell you what the hills are like. I had walking boots and walking socks on and I don't remember getting froze-toez so they should/will be OK in a workshop with only relatively likkle 'oles for the wind and cold to get in.

Keep on turning out the good stuff gal !! :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
 

L2wis

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Melinda_dd":2sbp0ugp said:
The only thing i haven't yet mastered is keeping the feet warm. I've tried 1 pair of thin socks and trainers, 2 pairs of thin socks and trainers, 1 pair of thick socks and trainers...... to no avail.
Today was 1 pair of thermal socks and my steel toe boots... slightly better, but still not toasty!

My feet get frozen too!
 

Jonzjob

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I normally wear a pair of clogs when I'm in my workshop and I don't get cold feet. They aren't wooden soled, but thickish rubber and very comfortable. The temps here can get well below freezing in the winter. That was quite a surprise for us because we are only 150m up so not high.
 

OldWood

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Any floor is all the better for a bit more insulation, so if you can get to Costco, or scrounge someone's ticket, get a pack of their clip together rubber matting (I'm sure it's available elsewhere too). It's about £10-12 for something like 10 x 600mm square tiles industrial grade rubber foam at least 10mm thick. Insulates, is easy to walk on and sweep and protects falling tools !

Rob
 

jumps

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OldWood":1owfbqhd said:
Any floor is all the better for a bit more insulation, so if you can get to Costco, or scrounge someone's ticket, get a pack of their clip together rubber matting (I'm sure it's available elsewhere too). It's about £10-12 for something like 10 x 600mm square tiles industrial grade rubber foam at least 10mm thick. Insulates, is easy to walk on and sweep and protects falling tools !

Rob

this sounds too good to be true......(that's not a slur Rob, it's a 'where can I get some that isn't costco!)

quick troll round the net failed to show anything :(
 

Jacob

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Melinda_dd":16i4qdh6 said:
...
The only thing i haven't yet mastered is keeping the feet warm. I've tried 1 pair of thin socks and trainers, 2 pairs of thin socks and trainers, 1 pair of thick socks and trainers...... to no avail.
Today was 1 pair of thermal socks and my steel toe boots... slightly better, but still not toasty!
You need some good outdoor walking boots along with thick wool socks which you might have to pay quite a bit for from an outdoor shop. But you get what you pay for - they tend to be warmer, more comfortable and longer lasting then working boots.
Buy them loose fitting, half to one size over, to allow for expanding feet when you stand (or walk) around a lot, and thick socks.
 

OldWood

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jumps":31sdqefj said:
OldWood":31sdqefj said:
Any floor is all the better for a bit more insulation, so if you can get to Costco, or scrounge someone's ticket, get a pack of their clip together rubber matting (I'm sure it's available elsewhere too). It's about £10-12 for something like 10 x 600mm square tiles industrial grade rubber foam at least 10mm thick. Insulates, is easy to walk on and sweep and protects falling tools !

Rob

this sounds too good to be true......(that's not a slur Rob, it's a 'where can I get some that isn't costco!)

quick troll round the net failed to show anything :(

"Interlocking floor mats" seems to be the thing to search on but none of the sites I'm finding approach Costco's price - maybe they've gone up significantly since in the last 5 years, or my memory is failing faster than I thought.

Rob
 

jumps

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Philip Streeting":2ufdin29 said:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=m570.l2736&_nkw=rubber+workshop+flooring

(homer) thanks - ebay 1 google 0........
 

Melinda_dd

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Jacob":lokawycb said:
Melinda_dd":lokawycb said:
...
The only thing i haven't yet mastered is keeping the feet warm. I've tried 1 pair of thin socks and trainers, 2 pairs of thin socks and trainers, 1 pair of thick socks and trainers...... to no avail.
Today was 1 pair of thermal socks and my steel toe boots... slightly better, but still not toasty!
You need some good outdoor walking boots along with thick wool socks which you might have to pay quite a bit for from an outdoor shop. But you get what you pay for - they tend to be warmer, more comfortable and longer lasting then working boots.
Buy them loose fitting, half to one size over, to allow for expanding feet when you stand (or walk) around a lot, and thick socks.

I have just bought a new pair of walking boots, still un christened and don't really want to muck them up in the workshop by dropping friction polish and god knows what on them..... as soon as the novelty has warn off them i'll wear them.

I like the idea of the heated socks and insoles, and apparently savers do some insoles that heat up when taken out of their packing and last for 6 hours..... activated by the air apparently..... only a couple of quid too!

My partner has just informed me there is also an oil filled radiator reserved for me... so fingers crossed I may be a bit warmer soon!!
 

Jacob

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Oil filled rad is brill - you have it in front of your bench and it warms your front. Or you have it between your legs, etc.
I put a bike saddle on mine (it just sat there, no engineering involved) so I could sit on it while I had a cup of tea or did the sudoku. If it had had wheels I could have scooted around the workshop on it, like a hobby horse.
 

OldWood

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Just out of interest how large are your workshops ? Melinda's we know is tiny and an oil filled radiator will warm it up quickly, particularly if she does something about insulation - no point in heating the outside world.

Mine is 2.5m x 5m and a 2kw thermostatically controlled fan heater brings it up to adequate comfort level - 12-15C - pretty quickly. But then it's new shop and has no draughts and plenty of insulation.

I am intrigued by how much wood work some people are doing to produce adequate shavings and sawdust for a stove; I'm sure that I could do the maths to show that 'x' kilos of sawdust would be required to heat a 'y' area workshop, but I know how many logs my slow burning house wood stove uses per day, or even part of the day, and then I think of those logs as sawdust ...... and I don't think it equates.

Rob
 

melvyne

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Are you insulating the workshop enough! I have a wooden workshed and covered the ceiling with 2" foil backed insulating board. It works just fine and a little background heating every so often makes all the difference.
Melvyn
 

boysie39

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Jacob":3knhwnid said:
Oil filled rad is brill - you have it in front of your bench and it warms your front. Or you have it between your legs, etc.
I put a bike saddle on mine (it just sat there, no engineering involved) so I could sit on it while I had a cup of tea or did the sudoku. If it had had wheels I could have scooted around the workshop on it, like a hobby horse.

Jacob, if I were you i'd put those wheels on as soon as you can, because a trip to the Hemryod? (Piles) clinic
cant be too far behind. excuse the pun :cry: :cry: :roll: :roll:
 

Lowlife

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I am intrigued by how much wood work some people are doing to produce adequate shavings and sawdust for a stove

Last year I planed and thicknessed almost 1Km of 30mm Western Red Cedar for planking my boat hull, just did another 100m of 70mm wide Pine for the cabin roof, and a similar quantity of Utile. I have large sacks of shavings everywhere as I have nowhere to get rid of them easily, too dusty to use for animal bedding, the council tip will charge me to dump it there as they don't believe it's "domestic", even though they would probably sell it on to be recycled into chipboard! Most of it will probably be used on the garden as mulch.
 

Jacob

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On a very cold day this is not as daft as it looks. If you haven't a bike saddle it would be difficult to knock up a wooden seat.

hothorse1.jpg


All it needs now is wheels, a head and tail, and I'm off!
 

worsley947

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You can get interlocking floor mats from JTF for about £10 for 6 600x600 I think they are
Dave
 
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