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Just got a new table saw, what causes this

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HomeyJay

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I’m cutting standard 4 X2 but I’m getting this fuzzy hairy stuff after the cut! I’m not sure what it’s called but what’s causing it? The blade is new, wood is new and I don’t really know what else to check. Can anyone please help?

43779D3C-D290-4EA5-A465-70A1183BA04B.jpeg
 

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Deadeye

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Someone with greater expertise will be along in due course, but the wood looks wet. Is it? Wet wood tends to tear rather than cut cleanly
 

Trevanion

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Some wood can end up like if it has interlocking grain and is unfavourable timber that but that does look a bit extreme, The blade may be "new" but is it a good one? Blades that come with new machines tend to be rubbish and should be replaced with something better like a Freud or CMT.

What timber is it? Tulipwood? Poplar?
 

HomeyJay

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Not sure what the wood is. It’s just tanalised 2x4 from a local lumberyard. I’m not sure what the blade is but it came standard with the Bosch saw that I bought. Not all the pieces are like this some are fine but the bad ones seem to weigh more and feel colder to touch. I’m assuming that it’s because they’re wet!
 

Droogs

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yep, tanalised wood is awful stuff as it is put through processing and out the door before everything is dry.
 

HomeyJay

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Aww rubbish.
So what can I do with this stuff? I’ve just cut up £60 worth to make a surprise for my wife as my first real project and I don’t think she’s going to hugely impressed with a hairy garden bench!

Can I just leave it unassembled and unglued somewhere to dry and out then sand it to get rid of the ‘hair’?
 

dzj

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Brush on some sanding sealer and sand away the "hairs".
 

HomeyJay

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Thanks, I’d never heard of that!
The plan was to plane all the surfaces to get them perfectly level and then sand it. Would it be best to apply the sanding sealer after the planing and?
Sorry for all the newbie questions, I’m just trying to learn this stuff!
 

dzj

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HomeyJay":1xvbzyfv said:
Thanks, I’d never heard of that!
The plan was to plane all the surfaces to get them perfectly level and then sand it. Would it be best to apply the sanding sealer after the planing and?
Sorry for all the newbie questions, I’m just trying to learn this stuff!
Yes, in general, sanding goes after planing.
Unless you're a planing ninja and can do away with sanding all together. :)
 

HomeyJay

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Hehe, not known for my ninja abilities so I’ll stick with procedure!
 

Adam9453

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What blade is fitted, is it a cross cut blade or ripping blade? If you don’t know then have a google and familiarise yourself with the different types as it’s key to use the right blade for the right cut to achieve acceptable results.
Tanalised timber is typically soaking wet when you buy it so is difficult to rip cut even remotely cleanly. I’d suggest stacking it ‘in stick’ and leaving to dry out for at least a few weeks but preferably months. If you need to do a project sooner then I’d buy some properly dried timber from a decent timber yard rather than a diy shed.
What are you building because tanalised timber has quite nasty chemicals in it which therefore means it should be used judiciously.
 

Benchwayze

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Homejay;

To buy some Western Red Cedar for a garden bench project is not going to work out much more expensive in the long run. The bench will outlast your good self probably, it will look good and you can either let it weather to a lovely silvery-grey or you can treat it to some linseed oil every two years or so. It's also easy to work with, although it bruises easily, so sharp tools and consideration are necessary. Oh yes; it's also comparatively light weight stuff and moving it about is no hardship.

Cons; Some people get the sniffles using cedar-wood, and it can reject adhesives like cascamite. ( I think the glue I used was past its sell by mind you! )

I love the scent of pencils in the shop! :)
Hope that helps

John (hammer)
 

topchippytom

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What make is the saw and i would tend to sand it after planing but depends on the moisture as wet timber can rip when cutting like in the photo.
 

HomeyJay

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The saw is a Bosch GTS 10 XC. The blade is just marked Bosch Pro or something.
I baked all the wood in the sun today for many hours and then just picked one at random and sanded it lightly and got rid of all the ‘hair’. The sun dried it all out and the wood just looks normal now.

I definitely won’t be buying this stuff again but even though I looked everywhere and asked a lot of questions, no one (including the lumber yard) told me that I really shouldn’t use tanalised timber for such projects! I just assumed that because I was building an outdoor thing, I should use ‘outdoor’ lumber.
Just inexperience, I guess.

I’d really love to try some of this red cedar but I’ve no idea where to get it from. Around here (South Wales) they just seem to sell pine or fancy hardwoods.
If anyone could recommend a decent lumber yard in South Wales, I’d be grateful!
 

MikeG.

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Anyone who is suggesting sanding or planing tanalised timber likely has never tried working the stuff. It's rough-as-old-boots building timber, or for fences and the like. You will zero chance of success trying to make it anything presentable, zero chance of sanding it smooth, and one percent chance of taking a decent shaving with a plane......but it is still really useful stuff. Put it down to experience, store it away (out of the sun, the biggest wrecker of timber there is), and buy yourself something more appropriate for the project. Silk purse and sows ear, and all that.
 

topchippytom

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HomeyJay":1k3qtt5w said:
The saw is a Bosch GTS 10 XC. The blade is just marked Bosch Pro or something.
I baked all the wood in the sun today for many hours and then just picked one at random and sanded it lightly and got rid of all the ‘hair’. The sun dried it all out and the wood just looks normal now.

I definitely won’t be buying this stuff again but even though I looked everywhere and asked a lot of questions, no one (including the lumber yard) told me that I really shouldn’t use tanalised timber for such projects! I just assumed that because I was building an outdoor thing, I should use ‘outdoor’ lumber.
Just inexperience, I guess.

I’d really love to try some of this red cedar but I’ve no idea where to get it from. Around here (South Wales) they just seem to sell pine or fancy hardwoods.
If anyone could recommend a decent lumber yard in South Wales, I’d be grateful!
Where in south wales are you
 

HomeyJay

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Near Bridgend.
I use Nottage Timber and so far I’ve hardly had anything from them that’s not been curved, cupped, twisted!
 
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