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beejay

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Ive just bid for ond won a Delta 40-530 for £29. Its in perfect working order c/w manual. used a few times and the tables a bit rusty but it seems like a bargain to me.
Never used one before but i think i'll have fun learning.
Is it an ok machine. whats the best baldes to get. and do i need anything else to get me going.
Thanks
beejay
 

Chris Knight

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I have an Omega 76.130/345-23 but the tables are brilliant and no blades are required 'cos it's got the 23XC conversion kit installed.

Seriously - what in earth is this thing? I hate having to Google to find out the answer to these alphabet soup questions.
 

Alf

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Up the proverbial creek
Or, in the immortal words of Jeff Gorman; wazzat den? :D

Cheers, Alf

P.S. Chris, the 23XC? You didn't upgrade from the B2 did you? Everyone says the earlier one has better burfls so I bet you're kicking yourself if you did.
 

beejay

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sorry folks, should have said. its a scroll saw and i bought it on Ebay.
beejay
 

Alf

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Up the proverbial creek
Ah, light dawns. Gill's your woman for scrollsaw advice. Have a look in this thread for her words of wisdom on blades. (Scroll down a bit)

Cheers, Alf
 

Gill

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Yippeeeeee!!! Another scrollsaw user :) :) :) .

Most of my limited knowledge is in the thread that Alf's already pointed out. Perhaps you could email Harry Neill http://tinyurl.com/6ejht in Bristol?

Delta's have a good generic reputation amongst American scrollsaw users so it should be ok to use. Errr... isn't it a bit late to ask that question after you've bought it :oops: :) ?

Gill

PS I forgot to mention. Most older models of scrollsaw have a slight 'pull' out of true. Modern saws don't have this problem to a noticeable degree, but since yours is not brand new, it might be a good idea to do a couple of straight line test cuts on some waste timber or mdf to get an idea of how strong any pull may be. In acute cases, you have to set the table a few degrees out of alignment in order to compensate, but I doubt very much that'll be necessary with your new purchase.
 

beejay

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thanks Gill, could be pickin' your brains over the coming months. I know about the buy but i thought for that kind of money i couldnt go far wrong. also, assuming I get half way to being reasonable and I still enjoy, I'll come to you for advice on the best one to buy, if thats ok with you.
What made me go for this was the thread recently by one of you showing all those lovely doorstops, I want to make them too!!! where does one get the patterns for them?? please let me know.
beejay
 

Gill

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Hi Beejay

PM sent to you.

FWIW, I use a Hegner Multicut 2 with variable speed and I'd unhesitatingly recommend Hegners to anyone in the UK with a serious interest in scroll sawing. They're expensive compared to other makes, but you'll never hear of a dissatisfied Hegner owner. I've still got my first Hegner and it's running as sweetly now as it was when I purchased it almost 20 years ago. The only trouble I've ever had arose after my teething puppy decided to chew it up. Fortunately, the Hegner agent in Hailsham gave it a complete overhaul for next to nothing.

Gill
 

aldel

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Beejay

It was me that posted on doorstops. They were not made from patterns but sketched out freehand to suite the piece of scrap hard wood. They are mostly made from scrap of between 3/4 to 1inch thick which is toughish going for a scroll saw and so I remove most of the wood using a 1/4 inch 6tpi blade in a band saw. I do use one of the generic vari-speed scroll saws (Axminster Perform CCVFS) to cut around some of the more detailed areas. The scroll saw will do the trick but it much quicker with the bandsaw.
I don't profess any artistic skills but search through clip art to get some inspiration and then draw up outlines from there.
You could use a mandraulic fretsaw!!!
Cheers
Aldel :D
 

Gill

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aldel":5nfnxh2n said:
They are mostly made from scrap of between 3/4 to 1inch thick which is toughish going for a scroll saw
You're not selling me on the Axminster, Aldel ;) :).

Gill
 

dedee

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These were cut from 1" thick beech and walnut on a Hegner Multicut 1 using Hegner's own reverse tooth blades - no cause for complaint but I am not in Gill's league
Andy

 

Gill

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dedee":3gg0ujuz said:
These were cut from 1" thick beech and walnut on a Hegner Multicut 1 using Hegner's own reverse tooth blades
They're lovely. I bet you didn't have any problems cutting the beech, either. The Multicut 1 is supposed to be able to cut material up to 50 mm thick but I wouldn't be happy cutting anything thicker than 40 mm; the swinging top arm is surprisingly painful when it thumps down onto fingers that are moving the piece (DAMHIKT).

dedee":3gg0ujuz said:
I am not in Gill's league
Wrong. You are.

Gill
 

dedee

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Gill,
Once the setup is sorted the beech was no problem. I've given up trying to find the right note when twanging the blade, I now just tighten the screw until my thumb hurts. Actually the walnut was a lot easier to cut as I still managed to burn the beech on some of the tighter turns.

Andy
 
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