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Jones and Shipman 540P Rebuild

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deema

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I thought I’d share my adventures with a new to me surface grinder. I’ve done a lot of woodworking machine restorations, and only dabbled a bit with metal working machines, so this is a first! Now, I know less than would fit in the back of a postage stamp about grinding, but I do have jobs that would be far better / easier with a surface grinder.

this is what it looked like in one piece!
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deema

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So the tear down begins. The table is only connected by the hydraulic piston arms, one either side. There are 4 bolts holding it on. You can’t lift the machine using the table or the piston arms will bend and need replacing. The piston is the bit with bits of tissue stuffed in the hydraulic ports. You can see at either end the two blocks that hold the table to to the rest of the machine.
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deema

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I don’t have a manual for this machine, if anyone has one and could send me a copy that would be really appreciated.
The hydraulic ram came off next. A few bolts and then it’s just a case of easing it iff the pins carefully.
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The table is extremely heavy, two man lift or preferably some form of lifting device. Anyway, with that off you arrive at what I’m going to call the cross slide carriage.
 

deema

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I’m posting photos which I took, so the photos may show the machine with parts removed that I haven’t yet described. I hadn’t considered doing a thread when I was pulling it apart. They may appear more than once!

I bought the machine described as being well maintained! Well, when I started to look at it and take it apart, that clearly as a stretch. The spindle has no discernible end end play. (You place a clock on the nose of the spindle and push the spindle in and note the deflection) there was none to speak off, well, about 1 micron; so good enough. The taper on the spindle was in good condition, and run out was again negligible, possibly 1 micron. (Clock on the side of the spindle and the spindle turned)

The cross slide is…….well………fluggered! The scale is in hundreds of a thou (microns there abouts) and there is just a bit of backlash, well around 3mm! The screw is a 5 TPI acme…..so almost completely worn through.

The hydraulic fluid looks like lapping paste, and the stuff on the ways was thick black with grinding dust. There are still witness marks of the scrapping evident on almost the entire length of the ways, which suggests that the state of the machine is something that’s happened recently.
 

TFrench

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Watching with much interest! One of these is definitely on my list in the future if I can figure out how to fit it in the workshop. There's some very useful stuff on practical machinist about them - I'm sure someone on there will have the manual. I think a company called andmar are the people to go to for spares on these.
 

Fergie 307

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You really don't want to plug hydraulics with tissue. You would be surprised how much of a nuisance a bit of fluff can cause. One easy way of doing it is to cut the finger off a plastic glove, stuff that with tissue and use it in the hole.
 

deema

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You really don't want to plug hydraulics with tissue. You would be surprised how much of a nuisance a bit of fluff can cause. One easy way of doing it is to cut the finger off a plastic glove, stuff that with tissue and use it in the hole.
Thanks Fergie, that’s appreciate, hadn’t thought about that, I will use your trick going forward.
 
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NetBlindPaul

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You really don't want to plug hydraulics with tissue. You would be surprised how much of a nuisance a bit of fluff can cause. One easy way of doing it is to cut the finger off a plastic glove, stuff that with tissue and use it in the hole.
Plugging ports with tissue would have resulted in disciplinary action when I worked for a global hydraulics OEM, unless the device was being dismantled for repair, and the tissue was only being used to stop oil from dribbling out before cleaning and dismantling.
 

Fergie 307

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Plugging ports with tissue would have resulted in disciplinary action when I worked for a global hydraulics OEM, unless the device was being dismantled for repair, and the tissue was only being used to stop oil from dribbling out before cleaning and dismantling.
Same here when I used to work on hydraulic pumps for tractors and such. Now I have a jar full of assorted plastic blanking plugs taken from various new or refurbished brake and hydraulic cylinders over the years.
 

Dalboy

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When I finished work I cleared out my toolbox to find loads of the plastic plugs which I used to cover the ends of connectors if I had to go and get a replacement hose made especially if it burst on a very muddy site
 
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