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Jig for routing dados

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Anonymous

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Hi all

I needed t ocut some dados and so made a quick jig which is shown here.

Slots in end pieces turned out to be a nightmare as I'm sure you'll remember form my previous post.

The jig works very nicely and gives absolutely perfectly sized slots. Only thing to remember is that the router base is not perfect and so it must be used in the same orientation in the jig each time it is used. You may see a black mark I made to remind me of orientation.

I cut some 2 pieces of ply to 275mm and 2 to 100mm. I glued 'em together as shown in photo. I then ran the router with my 1/2" straight cut bit along the top of the larger piece (router base pressed against top piece of ply) to give an edge that is exactly the width of the base edge to the cutter edge.
Repeat for other one.
I cut a couple of slots on the router table for end pieces (eventually :roll: ) and then glued + nailed the slotted pieces to one assembly. Make sure this is square.
I then bolted the other assembly to the slot with an 8mm coach bolt

To use it, I clamp a piece of wood + a single sheet of paper between each piece of ply to set it up, tighten coach bolts, clamp assembly to work piece, remove wood + paper and rout slot.

Not my idea - i saw it in a mag ages ago and finally got around tuit.

Worth knocking one up in my opinion.

Oh. I finished it in pure Tung oil :oops: :oops: Well... I'd just bought some and wanted to try it out :wink:






 
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Anonymous

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That's a home made version of the Canadian M.A.C. mitre board that can be used with either a circular saw or router. The bought version is limited to it's width of 18". I made a similar one a year ago & intend improving it with the addition of a long fence with adjustable stops for repetition trenches.
The advantage with the MAC board is the adjustable mitre fence allowing cuts at any angle up to 45° but at £40 it's a lot dearer than some ply & rails.
A stop fitted across the top enables stopped housings to be created.
 

Chris Knight

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Tony,

It is hard to beat a router for dadoing - especially if one lacks a Norm type dado head!

I use a variation on your theme which is to dispense with the pieces of wood that trap the router base but use a bearing guided cutter along the edges of the boards one sets for the width of the housing. This get around the assymmetry problem of most router bases but means you need a more expensive cutter to go to work with.
 

sawdustalley

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Definate elements of norm here....


For your information, "Dado" isn't an english word. We should be calling it a housing joint.

Also, we call a "rabbit" a rebate FYI. :p
 

Alf

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Although you could call it a trench too... Technically "dado" is an English word of course, just not the common English term - although I suppose we're going to have to assume that's no longer the case as dado is much more prevalent these days. Since we're being pedantic this morning, it's "rabbet" not rabbit too. :wink:

Cheers, Alf
 

johnjin

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Fancy Names
But a slot is a slot whichever way you look at it.
As for a housing I think it only refers to a joint but I'm sure someone would like to correct me here.

John
 

Alf

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sawdustalley":2o65g471 said:
maybe someone should write a woodworking dictionary :p
I wish they would; although we'd probably only all end up arguing about the definitions. :roll:

John, I think you're spot on there. I suppose a housing equates to a dovetail joint, and a trench would equate to a tail or pin, if you see what I mean. i.e. It's one of the parts of the joint. Heck, this getting as bad as that flaming national IQ test. :shock:

Cheers, Alf
 
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Anonymous

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Alf

Did you notice that my homemade bench is not as pretty as your purchased one?
Note the removable tool tray though to clamp jig - DC's idea :D

Cheers

Tony (with a RED PC router!)
 
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Anonymous

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Did a similar jig for the panels on a bookcase that i am making. set it up for a stopped "slot" and used a top bearing trim bit. this meant that the shelves either have to get rounded edges, or the slot squared off. it was easier just to change bits and round over the edge to fit into the rounded end of the slot.
:D :D Jaco (!!!!!!!!! :oops: :oops: )
 

Aragorn

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waterhead37":piezrawa said:
I use a variation on your theme which is to dispense with the pieces of wood that trap the router base but use a bearing guided cutter along the edges of the boards one sets for the width of the housing.
Chris - how do you set the depth of cut? I can't quite picture how you can determine this if the bearing guided cutter is following a straight edge... Do you have to use different height straight edges and then fine tune this with the router's plunge?
 

Chris Knight

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Aragorn,

Typically, the dados do not have to be very deep (although many folk cut them a lot deeper than need be). Anything from one eighth to one quarter of an inch is fine. Using a bearing guided cutter (I forget whether it's called a top or bottom bearing but in any case, the one with the bearing nearest the router collet) with a short cutter (about three eighths to half an inch or so of cutter length on the one I use), there is ample adjustment available on the plunge adjuster of the router when using three quarter inch thick wood for the jig.
 

Noel

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Chris,

Regarding your point about depth of dados you're right about alot of people going too deep, including myself. Once the dado is cut and the ajoining material slides in nice and snug and is able to stand vertical without support and before glue up then I'm happy.

Rgds

Noel
 
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Anonymous

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Newbie_Neil":3mmq51ko said:
The first thing I noticed was your red gloat. It looks really good.

How is it?

Cheers
Neil
Hi Neil

I love it. Best handheld tool-with-a-tail that I have tried. Quiet, very smooth and powerful.
I have tried 7 different routers from various manufacturers (performance pro, Trend, ELU, Makita) and this is by far the best.

I was surprised when I opened the case to find a red router though. Really expected it to be grey!

Cheers

Tony
 
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Chris

My original dado jig worked with a top bearing bit but they are expensive (and fairly rare) when compared to the 'normal' 2-flute straight cut bit, hence the new jig was made when the bearing guided bit was worn.

I did make a mistake in that I used MDF to make the older jig and the bearing started to wear a slot in the side of MDF which made it more difficult to get the slot spot on.
Daft choice of material :oops:

Cheers

Tony
 

Aragorn

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Thanks Chris - I'd forgotten about those short bearing guided cutters. Mine is 50mm+ so couldn't quite picture it with that in mind!
 
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