Is putting glued wood through a spindle moulder dangerous?

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h2h

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Hello, I am very much a beginner and soon I am going to be using a spindle moulder I have got for the first time. I am going to try and make some windows which will be my first ever project.

I'm going to be extremely careful using the spindle moulder, and something has come up that I don't know the answer to. I might like to glue 2 peices of wood with normal pva glue, let it dry then put it through the spindle moulder as one peice.

But the thing is being the begginner I am, I dont know if that is perfectly fine, or a really stupid and dangerous thing to do or not. Is it?

I'm thinking it should be ok. But then again, for all I know maybe that glue hardens inside the wood a lot more than I realise, and when the glued area passes through the cutter, maybe it can damage the blades, or far more importantly might cause nasty kickback and actually be dangerous.

I shouldn't think so, but would be good to know in advance if I am about to do something that is extremely inadvisable. Cheers.
 

peter-harrison

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It's fine. I do it all the time. Glue can be quite abrasive so it might dull the cutters after a while. I guess if you glue two bits with very different grain directions you might have some trouble but I can't recall any problems. I sometimes put ply through the spindle, for instance, and that's just a big pile of bits of wood glued together with opposing grain!
 

baldkev

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I might like to glue 2 peices of wood with normal pva glue, let it dry then put it through the spindle moulder as one peice.

Is that going to be for a window?
Basic pva probably isnt a great idea for use in an external window..... theres much better oprions these days, like d4 which is for exterior use
 

TRITON

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If youre pretty new to it then I'd suggest multiple passes taking only a small cut each time and make sure you have shaw guards and/or pressure guards in place preventing any movement. A big long push stick is also a given.
Feed it in standing at the front not at the back where it can be fired out. I've had a big length come shooting out which took out a small bandsaw before impaling itself in a wall 15 feet away, so you dont want to be in the line of fire so to speak.
Make sure everything, fences,guards are screwed down tight, you dont want anything to move.
Glue lines do chip blades on surfacers and thicknessers, but I reckon it should be ok, especially if its in multiple cuts.
Save the last cut for a very tiny cut, it gives a better final finish.
 

LBCarpentry

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No probs putting glued products through a spindle just make sure they are glued well. Products like woodex are made up of glued laminated pieces and designed for making things such as windows etc.
 

Ollie78

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Should be fine the glue line will be pretty thin. Loads of stuff is made from engineered sections.
Get some titebond 3 or something if its a window.
A power feed is your friend on a spindle moulder.

Ollie
 

Jones

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Moulding laminated timber is ok, if the glue can't hold it together during machining it's not good enough to hold it at all. For exterior joinery a PU glue or resorcinol will work forever, PVA even the waterproof stuff is more questionable, they don't use it for boat building
 
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