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Interior Satin Paint

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sxlalan

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Does anyone have any recommendations on the above? I am trying to finish a product with a hard wearing satin interior paint. The one I have tried initially is Crown Non Drip Satin. Non Drip isn’t the word, I almost need a spatula rather than a brush for the stuff. I am finding it quite hard to get a smooth finish as the bristle marks don’t ever seem to blend out. Can anyone offer any advice on either a way to apply this smoothly, a better paint to use, or a workable method of thinning (it is a water based paint)?

Thanks a lot

Alan
 

RogerS

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Alan

I wish I knew..but brush marks are my own bugbear as well. Maybe we need a 101 as the cousins say in applying paint/varnish etc.

What makes a 'quality bristle', for example?

Roger
 

colinc

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I dispair of the paint they sell in the sheds these days, it all seems to be 'one-coat' gloup.

Find your local Crown or Dulux trade centre. They sell good old-fashioned paint. Can't swear to it, but I'm sure that the quality of the emulsion particularly is so much better than you get in the sheds and the prices are certainly better all round.
 

Argee

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sxlalan":3naeyjb0 said:
Non Drip isn’t the word, I almost need a spatula rather than a brush for the stuff. I am finding it quite hard to get a smooth finish as the bristle marks don’t ever seem to blend out.
The problem with this type of product is in its title - "one coat."

Trying to dispense with the traditional "undercoat/topcoat" process may be valuable to people who are short of time/can't be bothered, etc., but in order to allegedly cover to the same standard in one coat rather than two, the product needs to be much more viscous (or should that be vicious? :)).

Any gel will be difficult to level off. I tend to get my paints from trade suppliers (such as Brewers), as it's getting difficult to obtain oil-based undercoat and topcoat elsewhere.

Of course it's more work and the brushes take much more cleaning, but you can control the mix by thinnig if necessary and get really good results.

Ever seen a professional use one-coat?

Ray.
 

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