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devonwoody

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I learnt something from this support reply, how to copy a program that does not allow a copy to be made of a cd to cd.



Thank you for contacting Corel Customer Support.

This issue is most likely caused by defective installer disc or compatibility issue with our disc and your DVD drive. To troubleshoot this, please try your installer into your other DVD drive or your other computer with DVD drive. You may also try copying your installer's contents to a temporary folder of your computer's hard drive then install the program from there.

If the other computer's DVD drive was able to read your installer, you may copy its entire contents into a USB memory stick, then use this to install your program into your computer.

Please do not hesitate to contact us with any further questions.

My post

I transferred it to the USB stick, I wanted to try the program on my wifes windows7 64 bit (experimenting before buying a new laptop). However it does look that the program will still not install to a new computer unless it has internet connection. (we dont want that on the other computer, (no internet, no virus :wink: )

Will mess about and post further .
 

donwatson

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Hi,
You could dump Windross and install any version of Linux.
No need to worry about viruses then.

take care
Don W
 

misterfish

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And Corel software products install and runs simply and problem free on 'any version of Linux' :?: :?: :?: If only.

Misterfish
 

devonwoody

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misterfish":2l3vi249 said:
And Corel software products install and runs simply and problem free on 'any version of Linux' :?: :?: :?: If only.

Misterfish

And what other software does not run smoothly on linux? Mind you Corel always are a problem for me on any set up.

Plus when I looked at Linux, I decided it was like trying to teach an old dog new tricks.
 

RogerP

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donwatson":385zh3zq said:
Hi,
You could dump Windross and install any version of Linux.
No need to worry about viruses then.

take care
Don W
There's really no need to worry about viruses on machines running a MS OS just install a decent anti-virus package. Windows Defender is good and it's free. Corel can be awkward and picky on install and frankly it's not very good anyway.

I use Linux, and have done so for years, but I realise it doesn't suit everyone.
 

MIGNAL

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Not being a graphic type user, what is the equivalent of Corel on Linux? There usually is a perfectly decent alternative for 99% of users.
Open office does everything I need of it, as does all the other packages that I installed. I even used Gimp once and that appeared far too complex for my simple graphical needs.
 

RogerP

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MIGNAL":2p8rzcql said:
Not being a graphic type user, what is the equivalent of Corel on Linux? There usually is a perfectly decent alternative for 99% of users.
Open office does everything I need of it, as does all the other packages that I installed. I even used Gimp once and that appeared far too complex for my simple graphical needs.
Pinta, Shotwell, Picasa, F-Spot, Geequi and Gimp all come to mind.
 

MIGNAL

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Ah, I,ve used F-Spot. Doddle.
I can never quite understand why some people have such trouble converting to Linux. I've had various versions of it installed on my PC for something like 7 years.
Over the years plenty of Windows folks have sat at my PC. Not one of them have ever seen a Linux machine before. From 12 year olds to 50 year olds, every single one of them are up and running without any direction from myself. It's intuitive and not that much different to Windows. Let's face it, how different is Open Office to MS Office? The internet and e-mail are identical.
 

JakeS

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MIGNAL":3e0uucru said:
I can never quite understand why some people have such trouble converting to Linux.
I think a large part of it is still that there are a lot of applications which either aren't available on Linux, or Linux doesn't have 100%-compatible alternatives for. If everyone at work uses software X and passes documents around in X's format, then using Linux may well mean you don't have the opportunity to take documents home and read them there, because none of your Linux software will read them. Last time I used OpenOffice, it could be fairly said to do 90% of the same things as Word, Excel, Powerpoint etc., but when it came to loading in Word, Excel and Powerpoint files, it kind of stumbled. It'd get the gist of things but horribly screw up the formatting, or graphics, or lose half the cell formulas when it didn't have an exact equivalent, and so on. I wasn't at all sorry to replace it with Office 2010 when the company offered it cheap to employees. If you ask what the Linux equivalent of Photoshop is, then Linux users will cheerily point you at GIMP or something, without asking "what do you use Photoshop for?" or "which features are important to you", and when the Photoshop user discovers that GIMP doesn't have a perspective-correct drawing mode or CYMK workflow support or whatever (it's been a while, I have no idea if either of those are still the case), they think "this is a piece of rubbish, those people lied to me, I'm going back to Windows".

Another part of it is that large swathes of the Linux community are still rather uptight and prissy about things that really don't matter, and can be downright unfriendly to deal with sometimes. My girlfriend really wanted to try using Linux seriously, there were a couple of pieces of software she wanted to use, but discovered that one website she visits frequently didn't work from Linux. She contacted the distro's support team, and got a response along the lines of "that particular kind of URL doesn't conform to RFCxxxx and is invalid, and therefore it's correct that it's not supported". Leaving aside that on both Windows and Mac, the URL resolves fine and works fine... so she stopped using Linux.

It seems to me that some people have experiences along the lines of the above, and some other people hear about them and worry that it'll happen to them if they try Linux.
 

Hudson Carpentry

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I have had linux and even a linux server. Although the server was very easy to setup I still preferred windows servers and windows machines so switched back.

I to have issues installing corel all the time, its a pain!
 

donwatson

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The alternatives to Corel Draw are Inkscape or XaraXtreme.
I agree using Linux is rather like teaching an old dog new tricks.
However I don't think that will help your original problem of installing Corel Draw on Wndows 7, and I am sorry I can't help.

take care
Don W
EDIT I am giving up the forum as of this morning. I don't find it fun any more and I want to have some fun.
Thanks to all for their help.
don
 

doorframe

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donwatson":33ima1fp said:
Don W
EDIT I am giving up the forum as of this morning. I don't find it fun any more and I want to have some fun.
Thanks to all for their help.
don
3mths and 16 posts. You've hardly given it a go. Fun? I find it a barrel of laughs. The trick is not to take it to heart when someone's on a wind up.

Roy
 

devonwoody

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Got hold of the wifes laptop yesterday and installed the corel painter to the windows7 without any trouble using the usb memory stick with the loaded program, just did a copy to stick, no burner needed!
 

doorframe

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Benchwayze":tcqvmr70 said:
Roy,
Do you remember when Basildon was called Boozildon and why?
Just wondering!
John :lol:
:lol: :lol: I've heard it called a lot of things, but Boozildon is a new one. We've got a leisure area known a Bas Vegas, where all the teenage wannabe's and over-age John Travolta's gather in their thousands to admire their XR3's and get pi**ed almost every night of the week. I've been in Barsden (as some of the poshhies like to pronounce it) for nearly 30yrs and it's gone from a thriving industrial town to Unemployed CHAV Central. No wonder Rico went to France!

Roy
 

Benchwayze

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Well the story I heard was similar Roy.

In the 1970s, one of your local worthies wrote a book on home brewing, and he considered Basildon as the home of the craze. Hence Basildon was called Boozeildon!' That's the story for what it's worth.

In my neck of the woods we don't have space for gatherings such as you describe. However, there's a pub just across the road from my house and they built the outside smoking area right next to the fence. There is a side road in between us, but in the summer, it's difficult to enjoy my back garden because of the noise. It's called progress! :roll:

Regards

John :)
 

Benchwayze

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Mig.

I know of Dave Line and I do have his books, but he isn't the one I was thinking about. Line concentrated on 'Real' brewing; making beers like the ones you could buy at the pub. I.e, Mashing, sparging using all the grains and hops. And there are some great recipes in his books.

His predecessor, from Basildon, was right at the forefront of the 'new' industry that was home-brewing, when the law was first changed to allow it. It was based on brew-kits, using malt extract syrups. It also gave home-brew a bit of a bad name, due to amateurs relying on loads of sugar, to produce high alcohol beers, with very little body!

I'll research a bit and see if I can find the Basildon guy's name.

Cheers

John :D :eek:ccasion5:
 
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