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insulating a shipping container

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Matt@

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I happen to use a 20' shipping container for misc storage but its uninsulated (like most of them are) and sweats in the winter. Does anyone have a good way of insulating these things or stopping the condensing? I've read of chemicals you can place inside that soak the moisture up but would prefer a phyiscal and long term way of solving the problem.

Another soloution seems to be foam insulation spray - I can buy a DIY kit for about £500 but cant find anyone apart from nationwide and expensive who will do the job themselves.

Another option I guess is lining the inside with celotex or kingspan by gluing it to the ceiling and sides...anyone used this?

any other ideas?!

Thanks
 

chippymart

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Use solvent free adhesives if glueing celotex/kingspan to anything. Trioso is another option. could batten out,staple Trioso onto battens then nail on sheet material on top. Trioso compresses to about 12mm. Quicker than cutting celotex in between and no nasty dust, just a little more expensive. The likes of Wickes and B&Q do there own versions just can screw through it,only nail.
 

Matt@

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to be honest, I'm hoping to do this within battening as going onto metal, I will in to self tappers. Wont the celotex just stick to the metal sides of the container, edges taped and corners sealed, job done? never heard ot trioso so will look that up! Blister just read your thread, nice job you done there :)
 

chippymart

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Screwfix do an expanding foam adhesive(not gap filler) which you can stick sheet material to walls etc. Ive used to stick Hardy board onto plasterboard before tiling. Just connect to a gun and away you go. Think they have a video on their site. Not sure if it would melt celotex though. 3M will have an adhesive that will stick celotex without eatin it
Hope that helps
 

nev

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I did one once with battens hammered and propped in place with the kingspan fixed to that, which worked to a degree but still had a few drips from between the sheets. I dont think it stopped the condensation, just hid it from view. It got a lot better when put some vents in too.(angle grinder, square hole, 4" bathroom type vents , loads of silicone)x4.
 

houtslager

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IMHO . your better off doing a roof over the container to prevent the greater heat fluctuations reaching the inside, and thus creating the condensation problems.
Then you can insulate between the roof and container, and if you do the same to the walls it would make a far better "shed"
Just my penny's worth.
 

No skills

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Its not that hard to batten/insulate/plywood line a 20' shipping container. When self employed I used to do one in a day, needed a pair of hands to help lift the ceiling sheets up (depending on thickness 1/4 inch is do-able solo with practice) but other than that 1 day (with practice 8) ).

If you need any advise let me know.
 

Matt@

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Thanks for replies and I had thought of adding a false roof to the outside a while ago. Going to phone a place in Witney tomorrow who do foam spraying as this is really what I want to do. Surprised no one has mentioned this .. It's used for canal barges amoungst other things apparently
 

Lons

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One of my mates has 2 of these 20 x 10 containers side by side and he bolted them together, put on a pitched corrugated steel roof (powder coated) and clad the whole of the outside with shiplap.
Looks great from all sides of the building except the end with the 2 doors as he didn't clad those #-o

It's been up a couple of years and I recently put in a 10 x 30 mtr concrete base next to it so he could errect a purpose built "shed" against it :shock:

It's in a field where he keeps livestock and I built a stone 2 storey barn for him a few years ago. Didn't need planning for the containers or shed as it's agricultural as informed by the local la when he applied.

Bob
 

Jren37

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Hi Skills
I'm resurrecting this thread if possible as I would like to insulate / board the walls to take load bearing hanging racks.
You say you have done it in a day.
I'm most specifically interested in how the battens have been attached to the shipping container walls. Some people recommend sticks like 's::t' adhesive but will this be secure if I am hanging a heavy load from the wall. Will probably be using osb or thick ply as the covering.
Or do I really have to drill the walls.
Will this affect resale value?
Also will it affect waterproofing I.e. leaks through the drill holes.
If I have to drill rather than stick what kind of screws would be best (self tappers probably ) but are these going to stick out the outside??
Thanks for any response in advance guys
 

Lons

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We had the underside of a slate roof sprayed with 50mm of foam on a stable conversion we did a number of years ago. It was a local firm who did it and they were dressed up like spacemen :lol: Do a search under roofing companies.
What I would do assuming cost was ok for the foam is batten out the walls first using adhesive then the ceiling which will brace the top of the wall battens, have the foam sprayed which will add even more strength then scrape off surplus foam from the battens and sheath the walls with whatever material you choose. Will be more than strong enough to hang cupboards etc. as the top is braced and load mostly downwards.
I would be careful about running electric cables through the foam however unless in conduit.

Bob
 

woodpig

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Insulating and cladding the outside means you won't lose any storage space as well.
 

beech1948

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Previous experience with doing exactly the same with turning 3 containers into a workshop is to provide a pitched roof, add batters of 3x2 structured so that roof batters bear on the vertical ones, infill with insulation. Just as advised above.

In addition put in a dehumidifier and a couple of air vents.

In my example I mounted all of my insulation on the outside p plus shed like cladding and built a small lean to for comp resistor, dust collector and a big industrial dehumidifier I got cheap.

Good luck

Alan
 

No skills

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Holy thread revival Batman..

In short, we don't glue or screw any timber to container walls. Timber stud work walls are built inside the container, insulation is installed (sheets for ceiling, fibreglass for walls) and plywood covering applied.
In fairness, for the standard building site ply lined storage boxes there is no insulation applied to the doors, just a plywood covering. Insulating the doors wouldn't be that hard if you really wanted to but you would be better off building an insulated bulkhead with personnel door behind the container doors if you were set on best insulation.

Fwiw
 

Jren37

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Guys thanks v much for all your comments
My main objective is strong interior walls capable of taking hanging weight.
I'm not bothered too much about insulation. It is the method of fixing the timber struts/frame to the interior walls
Is it a case of 'jamming' them in and bracing across ceiling.
What about timber drying out
 

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