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Installing wood burner in garage. Do I have to follow regs?

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flanajb

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I have a building notice to install a wood burner in my garage and I want to find out whether I have to follow building regs?

I am going to use twin walled flue pipe after the first 1000mm so that all combustible materials are outside of the 60mm distance from the pipe. What I am trying to understand is whether I have to fit the firestop plates where it goes through the floor into the roof space. Given that it is a detached garage and nobody resides in it do I still have to install these. I am just trying to keep the costs down as these will add £80 to the bill.
 

flanajb

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phil.p":223pv28u said:
It might be worthwhile asking your insurance co..
That's interesting. Do you mean with regards to not following regs or to installing a burner in the garage?
 

flanajb

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phil.p":1zh5l7cv said:
Either - they'll grab any excuse not to pay if something goes wrong.
I am not sure whether anything is covered anyway :-(
 

Louise-Paisley

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If you happen to be in a smokeless zone which includes a lot of towns these days then its quite likely you will have the council knocking on the door, while they will usually turn a blind eye to a portable device like a chiminea once you install something in a building it becomes a permanent heating appliance and likely to get stamped on sooner or later
 

flanajb

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Louise-Paisley":3lz8rj1g said:
If you happen to be in a smokeless zone which includes a lot of towns these days then its quite likely you will have the council knocking on the door, while they will usually turn a blind eye to a portable device like a chiminea once you install something in a building it becomes a permanent heating appliance and likely to get stamped on sooner or later
Not in a smokeless zone so no issues there
 

Louise-Paisley

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not quite that simple, that document is primarily concerned with domestic properties i.e. houses..

Exempt buildings include:
CLASS I Buildings controlled under other legislation e.g. Any building the construction of which is subject to the Explosives 5 and 1923. Or Nuclear related buildings.
CLASS II Buildings not frequented by people (unless close to an existing building).
CLASS III Greenhouses and agricultural buildings (Not used for Retail).
CLASS IV Temporary buildings (Erected for less than 28 days).
CLASS V Ancillary buildings.
CLASS VI Small detached buildings [Garages, garden storage sheds/huts] (less than 30 square metres floor area with NO sleeping accommodation therein).
CLASS VII Extensions - Porches, Covered Ways, Conservatories, (less than 30 square metres floor area).
The Building Regulations 2000 have been amended five times since the original statutory instrument was published. It is good practice to have exemption confirmed by the relevant local authority prior to construction. The Statutory Instrument give the full conditions.[7]
 

wobblycogs

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While £80 is not to be sneezed at I'd say it's worth following the regs from an insurance point of view if nothing else. While you doubt that the contents of your garage are covered the structure itself would be covered by your house insurance surely, if it burns to the ground at least you'd stand a good chance of getting the building paid for. I was told in no uncertain terms when we fitted a stove (in the house) that any installation must follow the regs tot he letter for the insurance to remain valid.
 

Louise-Paisley

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I am not saying you should not get regs approval.. just that it is not entirely clear cut if you HAVE to.

My pal is desperately trying to sway me into fitting a WBS in our workshop and I am desperately trying to talk him out of the notion, mostly because I know he will end up burning the place to the ground! Also our shop is in a smokeless zone and I would say it will take less than a fortnight before a complaint is made and the council puts a stop to it so that would be £300 for a stove and another £100 or more for flue out the window.
 

acewoodturner

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There are stoves you can buy that are clean air compliant. This means that the council cannot stop you from using it as long as you are burning timber and not plastic waste, even if you are in a smokeless zone. They should meet building regs as a matter of good practice and if you are unsure of installing one yourself get a HETAS approved installer to do the work. I wouldnt worry too much about installing one in a garage as most are made mainly from concrete and the only thing to set fire to (apart from stock) would be the rafters. There is plenty of guidance on quite a few stove sellers websites.
I have run a stove in my workshop now for about 7 years and when I moved to my present one I used to get complaints from a neighbouring factory about my smoke going in their intake for air conditioning. They complained to the Environmental Health Services of the council who put a stop notice on me using it. I phoned up the womoan who wrote the letter and she agreed that I could use it for buring timber when the wind wasnt blowing in their direction and after 5pm and weekends. This suits me fine as the wind very rarely blows in their direction. My stove isnt clean air act compliant and is a hotspot pop3 model, which is brilliant for getting rid of sawdust and shavings. I wouldnt be without a stove and plan to get a 20kw one before the winter.

Mike
 

wobblycogs

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Our stove is clean burning (smokeless zone approved) and once it's up to temperature you can't even tell it's running by looking at the chimney. I asked them what they did to make it smokeless as they sell a smokey (erm that doesn't sound right) version as well. Apparently it's just a stop fitted to the air intake to prevent you come completely shutting it down. I can't believe that's not the case for all stoves but it's worth asking.
 

gregmcateer

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Can I hijack slightly and ask - will all woodburners work with shavings? (ie from a lathe), or do you have to get something specific that can handle not-just-lumps of wood?

Did that make sense?

TIA

Greg
 

flanajb

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Louise-Paisley":39aobpob said:
I am not saying you should not get regs approval.. just that it is not entirely clear cut if you HAVE to.

My pal is desperately trying to sway me into fitting a WBS in our workshop and I am desperately trying to talk him out of the notion, mostly because I know he will end up burning the place to the ground! Also our shop is in a smokeless zone and I would say it will take less than a fortnight before a complaint is made and the council puts a stop to it so that would be £300 for a stove and another £100 or more for flue out the window.
Why are you concerned that your pal will burn down your workshop?
 

RogerS

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gregmcateer":3h5w83sr said:
Can I hijack slightly and ask - will all woodburners work with shavings? (ie from a lathe), or do you have to get something specific that can handle not-just-lumps of wood?

Did that make sense?

TIA

Greg
British Hardwoods were selling something specifically designed for sawdust etc.
 

Phil Pascoe

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You would probably have problems burning only shavings or sawdust, because they starve anything under them of air, but as long as you are mixing what you burn you shouldn't have any problem.
 

acewoodturner

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I can burn large quantities of shavings and sawdust at the same time in my woodburning stove. It has an inlet pipe od about 40mm in dia which goes about 2/3 of the way into the stove and acts like and afterburner. Due to the fact is is fed from the top and not the front it is easier to feed them in witha scoop which was meant for dog or cat food. I normally wait till it is burning quite hot to add it. I save all my sawdust and shavings up from the summer to use in the winter.
 

RogerS

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phil.p":2b9zozlo said:
You would probably have problems burning only shavings or sawdust, because they starve anything under them of air, but as long as you are mixing what you burn you shouldn't have any problem.
True but the BH stove is different.
 
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