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Inside shed planning help needed

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Garno

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I have a small shed for woodworking although twice as big as to what I had before.
The internal measurements are around 7 1/2' x 7 1/2'
Nearer Christmas time I will be selling the tablesaw and replacing it with Evolution RAGE5-S 255mm Electric Table Saw 230V (A gift from wife, son, daughter and grandkids)
This will clear a lot of room up. The router table will go onto a mobile table so will be a lot lower.

I have a lot of dead space in the shed and already find I am constantly searching for tools and power tools. How can I best utilise the space I have? At the moment the tablesaw is causing me the biggest headache and when I replace it I don't really want to have the same problems, would I be better off getting rid of the racking (that is also taking up lots of space) and making something with less depth and not going all the way down to the floor? also should I do the same with the shelves?

I have a number of power tools I would like to be at hand otherwise they will never be used but the carry cases they come in are very cumbersome and take up a lot of space. If possible I would like to keep the racking that the P/T is on and the one with the bandsaw also the kitchen top needs to stay as that is my bench. Does anyone have any ideas on what I should do to get some kind of workflow in the shed? Sorry about the photo quality but the hand shakes a lot and some images are a little blurred.

Outside shed.jpg
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MikeG.

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Have you got any possibility of temporary storage outside your shed? If so, I suggest stripping everything out except your bench, and not putting it back until it has a properly allocated space. That way you'll be able to put all your hand tools in one pile, your hand held electric tools in another pile, your machines in a group, your materials in sorted pile/s, and so on, and can think about how they would be best stored in the workshop. If you can, do a scale drawing of your workshop, (plan view), and have a bit of a sketch as to what might fit where. If you are inclined, and if you have the budget, then this would also be the best opportunity you might get of getting a replacement bench, which would transform your woodworking experience.
 

frank horton

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Vamos, Crete, GREECE.......
Garno,
take a look at this...what a clever young man......
u have a smaller place but he's got more gear....!!!!
or dial in :-on you tube..
FULL REMODEL OF MY SHIPPING CONTAINER WORKSHOP! (2020)
then u really need to sort out another shed....hahaha..
be inyeresting to see what others make of it....
personally I always try to get kitchen units that are from a remodel......keeps everything neat and tidy....
 

Garno

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Have you got any possibility of temporary storage outside your shed? If so, I suggest stripping everything out except your bench, and not putting it back until it has a properly allocated space. That way you'll be able to put all your hand tools in one pile, your hand held electric tools in another pile, your machines in a group, your materials in sorted pile/s, and so on, and can think about how they would be best stored in the workshop. If you can, do a scale drawing of your workshop, (plan view), and have a bit of a sketch as to what might fit where. If you are inclined, and if you have the budget, then this would also be the best opportunity you might get of getting a replacement bench, which would transform your woodworking experience.
Thank you as always Mike.

I will look into the possibility of moving everything into the house but I think that may just be a step too far with Mrs G, as much as I would like one I have to concede on the replacement work bench, Is it ok to use Ply as a workbench top or is that a big no no? The racking that the planer is on and the bandsaw goes underneath the worktop and lends itself as extra support as the worktop has no supporting legs. I think sorting all of that out will come at a much later date.
 

Garno

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Garno,
take a look at this...what a clever young man......
u have a smaller place but he's got more gear....!!!!
or dial in :-on you tube..
FULL REMODEL OF MY SHIPPING CONTAINER WORKSHOP! (2020)
then u really need to sort out another shed....hahaha..
be inyeresting to see what others make of it....
personally I always try to get kitchen units that are from a remodel......keeps everything neat and tidy....
Thank you for taking the time to post that Frank.

He obviously knows what he is doing but it is the racking that has interested me but then again I do like your idea on used kitchen units.
 

Terry - Somerset

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This is not meant as a criticism (I've been there and still not completely solved it) but it has all the hallmarks of a workshop that has evolved over time with no master plan. I would humbly suggest the following:
  1. Clear out as much as you can temporarily and paint the inside white - it will improve the lighting massively​
  2. Upgrade sockets to avoid trailing wires around the place?​
  3. Nothing wrong with a kitchen worktop "bench". Could resurface with ply or mdf if you want. Build storage drawers underneath to support the worktop.​
  4. Put all machines on castors - if height is required build storage underneath the machine - drawers or cupboards​
  5. Try and have one wall for machines which you pull out as required.​
  6. Put higher level storage above the machines - this could take a lot of your tool storage boxes​
  7. Personally I would be inclined only to have regularly used tools on pegs or hooks. The rest to go in the cupboards/drawers.​
  8. Need to think about how to store materials - depends what you normally work on​
 

Garno

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This is not meant as a criticism (I've been there and still not completely solved it) but it has all the hallmarks of a workshop that has evolved over time with no master plan. I would humbly suggest the following:
  1. Clear out as much as you can temporarily and paint the inside white - it will improve the lighting massively​
  2. Upgrade sockets to avoid trailing wires around the place?​
  3. Nothing wrong with a kitchen worktop "bench". Could resurface with ply or mdf if you want. Build storage drawers underneath to support the worktop.​
  4. Put all machines on castors - if height is required build storage underneath the machine - drawers or cupboards​
  5. Try and have one wall for machines which you pull out as required.​
  6. Put higher level storage above the machines - this could take a lot of your tool storage boxes​
  7. Personally I would be inclined only to have regularly used tools on pegs or hooks. The rest to go in the cupboards/drawers.​
  8. Need to think about how to store materials - depends what you normally work on​
Terry that's a great post thank you.

Would you keep the racking the P/T and the bandsaw are on or make some cupboard units with a suitable top? Would it be a viable option to put them on top of a unit with casters so I will have full use of the benchtop? or would that be a dangerous thing to do?
I like the idea of having drawers all the way under the worktop to give it extra support.
I have only had the shed for about a year and you are right there has never been any planning for what went inside it, the no planning is now coming back to bite me.
Once I know what I can and can not do I will take MikeG's advice and get it sketched out, I plan to get it started as soon as I sell my tablesaw as I will have more space to work in.

Thanks again
 

Terry - Somerset

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I have put my router table and small planer on castors with home built cupboard/shelves underneath - this works fine.

Some of the kit is on tool stands - the thicknesser is on castors, the pillar drill, bandsaw and sander are not. Splayed legs add stability but reduces usability - rectangular is good for shelves and drawers and uses less space

.1597697642655.png

I recently managed to put 8ft length through the thicknesser in a garage only 17ft long - no trouble to move and connect to extraction and power.

But if I need to machine long lengths on either bandsaw or drill it is a pain to move the machines - something to be improved in the future!
 

treeturner123

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Why bother with all this?

The lack of any sawdust seems to indicate that no tools are used in anger!!!

I would be ashamed to show a photo of my shed!!

Sorry,only joking!!

Phil
 

AES

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Garno, there is, IMO, some very good advice posted above (apart from the one directly above this).

As you've already discovered, as time go by, tools (and materials) increase, even when working on the most limited of budgets. I would therefore highly recommend:

A. French cleats along part of (better, all of, if possible) one wall. At or a bit below roughly the height between your elbow and your shoulder (depends on how big the tools are and how tall you are). This provides the flexibility to add more tools, etc, as time goes on, and if the tools aren't too "deep" and the machines are on castors, access is still pretty easy (AND you'll learn pretty quickly what you use all the time and what less frequently).

B . Some sort of netting/light plastic cord, etc, etc, fixed on the eaves (inside!) on one side of the shed and running directly up under the ceiling (after painting white) up to the apex and down to the other side of the shed. This will allow "temporary" storage of longer lengths of timber, piping, some sheet off cuts, etc - NOT too much weight though, hence the use of "netting" or light cord.

Good luck mate.
 

Garno

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Why bother with all this?

The lack of any sawdust seems to indicate that no tools are used in anger!!!

I would be ashamed to show a photo of my shed!!

Sorry,only joking!!

Phil
I spent a week getting it in a pristine condition for the photo :)
 

Garno

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Garno, there is, IMO, some very good advice posted above (apart from the one directly above this).

As you've already discovered, as time go by, tools (and materials) increase, even when working on the most limited of budgets. I would therefore highly recommend:

A. French cleats along part of (better, all of, if possible) one wall. At or a bit below roughly the height between your elbow and your shoulder (depends on how big the tools are and how tall you are). This provides the flexibility to add more tools, etc, as time goes on, and if the tools aren't too "deep" and the machines are on castors, access is still pretty easy (AND you'll learn pretty quickly what you use all the time and what less frequently).

B . Some sort of netting/light plastic cord, etc, etc, fixed on the eaves (inside!) on one side of the shed and running directly up under the ceiling (after painting white) up to the apex and down to the other side of the shed. This will allow "temporary" storage of longer lengths of timber, piping, some sheet off cuts, etc - NOT too much weight though, hence the use of "netting" or light cord.

Good luck mate.
I agree there is some great advice that has been posted.
I need to start measuring everything and draw a plan, I particularly liked the idea of the draws supporting the worktop (Terry suggested that gem)
 

Sideways

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Replan everything on paper. To the inch !
Galley kitchen style, shallow-ish benches along both long walls, tools in boxes and any machines that lift on a big shelf below. Roof space is useful for storage but stay far enough above head height.
French cleats and / or shelves on both long walls to max 10" deep front- back
Shelving etc to be at least 12-18" above work surface so you don't make it unusable.
At some point, empty it all into the garden and put it back how it should be, essentials first. Anything left has to be culled.

Small spaces come at a cost:
  • You need to be v organised.
  • Need to spend money or time making storage.
  • Need to put away tools after use, not wait to the end of the job
  • You need to brutally rationalise your tools to keep only what matters / then improve by replacing or trading up. One in, two out.
  • You will have to buy materials to the job as you don't have space to store.
  • You need good folding workbenches to do bigger work outdoors and will have to wait for the weather.

I'm Sideways, i'm a toolaholic.
Recovery is long slow and painful.
Do as I say, not as I do :-D

Optimising and improving a small space is actually v satisfying. It's highly personalised and fascinating to see other people's solutions to common problems.
 

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