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Input from Experienced Turners would be appreciated.

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CHJ

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I need some thoughts on shop layout, tool storage, method-location etc. relative to the Lathe. On the basis that it will never be correct in 12 months time are there any obvious pitfalls that I should avoid.

Starting with the premise that this space is for wood turning only at present.
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1. Considered user (me) as Novice on the wood turning front, at the mastering tool use and developing (slowly) hand skills stage, and definitely on the downward slope of life’s curve, albeit as shallow as I can make it.

2. Blank workshop space (wall and floor) of some 80 sq.ft. floor and 60sq.ft. wall. All external walls will be insulated & dry lined.

3. Lathe (5ft.long bed, swinging headstock) is currently on stand but could be on suitable free standing bench/cabinet.

My thoughts so far, driven by the fact that there is limited wall space available adjacent to Lathe due to windows:

1. Lathe must be positioned to allow hollow tail stock boring to be used in future.
2. To put all Tool racks, Accessories storage etc into a floor to ceiling wall cabinet in northeast corner, with internal heater if moisture in winter is problem.
3. To make cabinet for under Lathe instead of stand icorporating temporary tool resting places or,
4. To make a mobile floor standing side cabinet for positioning adjacent to lathe as a tool resting place and abrasives storage etc.
5. Make a similar cabinet to carry Tool Grinders (Wet and Dry) to be housed in here but moved to adjacent room for use to avoid grinding debris contaminating wood etc.

Observations:
Chippings control is currently via dustpan and brush and small vacuum. Anything better could be installed outside on North wall.
Windows immediately behind Lathe will require debris shield in case of airborne wood.
Lathe may have to be repositioned or blinds fitted to windows in summer.
 

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dedee

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Chas,
I am not an experienced woodturner but I would like to make a comment about your item 2 "with internal heater if moisture in winter is problem"

You will need more than a heater to control moisture, a dehumidifier may be required which will probably require 5 or 6 degrees celsius to work efficiently.

Andy
 

Philly

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Chas
Just an aside-have you thougth about what might happen if a piece comes off the lathe? The window directly behing looks like a major target.
DAMHIK
Philly :D
 

CHJ

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dedee":2lp943su said:
Chas,

You will need more than a heater to control moisture, a dehumidifier may be required which will probably require 5 or 6 degrees celsius to work efficiently.

Andy
Thanks for the inputAndy

OK noted, I was thinking more on avoiding condensation on tools , not getting rid of it completely in workshop. I have a dehumidifier in house, another would be no problem though. Have not needed one in my current Garage Workshop, but I think that is down to lots of air movement. Current building has low temp avoidance (below 8deg.C or there abouts) via Infra-red heater lamps.
 

CHJ

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Philly":251uzo11 said:
Chas
Just an aside-have you thougth about what might happen if a piece comes off the lathe? The window directly behing looks like a major target.
DAMHIK
Philly :D
Thanks Philly (see my second observation ) I am just awaiting the location of strong Wire grid to do that.
 

Argee

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3. To make cabinet for under Lathe instead of stand icorporating temporary tool resting places or,
4. To make a mobile floor standing side cabinet for positioning adjacent to lathe as a tool resting place and abrasives storage etc.


The most important thing about any lathe is its stability and freedom from vibration. This alone will improve both performance and turning. The metal stand already supplied is capable of taking a shelf and that would be the first thing I'd add, followed swiftly by some ballast (assuming that you don't want to bolt the lathe to the floor).

It would then be possible to include a vertical piece of sheet stock, leaning back from the front of the shelf to the rear of the underside of the top of the stand (window side). This would give you a slightly inclined platform on which to mount tools. Obviously, you'd need to make some locators for the tools, with "pass through" holes at the bottom and cups for the tops, someting like the ones above my lathe, if you can make them out:



The "lean-back" effect would make the tools fairly stable, providing they've got enough of a cup to seat in. Might be a "quick fix" in your present situation. You could try it and if found suitable, leave it. If not, not much work to remove it. Hope some of that makes sense? :)

Ray.
 

duncanh

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5. Make a similar cabinet to carry Tool Grinders (Wet and Dry) to be housed in here but moved to adjacent room for use to avoid grinding debris contaminating wood etc.

Depending on your tool usage you may be sharpening tools quite regularly (every 10 minutes maybe) so you may want to reconsider using your grinder in a different room. Mine is less than 1m away from the lathe (I just need to turn left 90 degrees to use it) and I've never noticed any contamination.

I think most books I've read suggest the grinder be right next to the lathe. The further away it is the more you'll be tempted to work with a less than sharp tool, making turning less enjoyable and harder to learn.

(I've been turning for less than a year and it's only a hobby so my experience may differ from others)

Duncan
 

CHJ

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Argee":2yhrpl8t said:
The most important thing about any lathe is its stability and freedom from vibration. This alone will improve both performance and turning. The metal stand already supplied is capable of taking a shelf and that would be the first thing I'd add, followed swiftly by some ballast (assuming that you don't want to bolt the lathe to the floor).
Thanks Ray for the input.
The bolting to the floor would be no problem once I am happy with position. a shelf & ballast it is until that time.

Argee":2yhrpl8t said:
The "lean-back" effect would make the tools fairly stable, providing they've got enough of a cup to seat in. Might be a "quick fix" in your present situation. You could try it and if found suitable, leave it. If not, not much work to remove it. Hope some of that makes sense?
Ray.
Perfect sense. I had thought of putting them under Lathe (your position above Lathe would have been my first choice given the wall space) I was a bit bothered about the quantity of wood chip debris that they may collect. Will look into making suitable rack that will both fit under machine and be relocatable if not happy with setup.
 

CHJ

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duncanh":3lic42mu said:
Depending on your tool usage you may be sharpening tools quite regularly (every 10 minutes maybe) (snip..)I've never noticed any contamination.
Duncan
Thanks Duncan I had not considered the sharpening being that regular, no reason that my 'grinding cabinet' could not stay close to Lathe.
(I am reluctant to go for fixed benches because of limited wall space)
 

Argee

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I was a bit bothered about the quantity of wood chip debris that they may collect.

Chas,

I understand about the "debris" concern, but a simple piece of old curtain trapped between a couple of slim battens and wedged under the front rail would stop that, otherwise what I do is to give a swift vacuum after a session - depends how "house-proud" you are! :)

Ray.
 

CHJ

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Argee":cfb9xl7l said:
a simple piece of old curtain trapped between a couple of slim battens and wedged under the front rail would stop that,
Ray.
Now why did I not think of that :?: :!: :!:

My lateral thinking quotient is slipping :cry:
 
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Anonymous

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Hi CJ
If you decide to fit a cabinet... freestanding or between the legs :p

Instead of hingeing the doors, make the bottom rail with a rebate to allow the door (mine are simply ply with a finger hole) to slip in and secure at the top with a turn button. This allows using the door as a drawing board or better still, take a piece of 2 x 1, drill holes for the tools to drop in, screw it to the door... I've enclosed mine in thin ply ... 'cos it looks better. Your tools will then be ready to hand. You might like to drill 1" holes in the top rail... and chop the tops off = handy tool rack!
If it's of interest I'll mail you a pic or two.

Like Duncan, I like me grinder close by... a quick tickle and it's back on the job!! :lol:
 

CHJ

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oldsoke":2pym5iny said:
Hi CJ
If it's of interest I'll mail you a pic or two.
Yes please, as they say a picture is worth a thousand words.

Thanks for the input.
 
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