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Garno

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I am in need of a little advice please.

I have been looking at some second hand Jacob Chucks on a well known auction site and have noticed that most come with a 2MT tapered arbor attached, yet looking at new ones they don't seem to have them attached. According to Keith Rowley's book "Woodturning a foundation Course new edition" he says that it is better if I get one with a removable tapered arbor.

My Lathe is a 2MT 1" x 8TPI, I would like to know if anyone knows where I can get the full kit? also what size of Jacob Chucks will I get most use out of and finally do Jacob chucks come with the arbor already attached as seen here no.34 JACOBS 0-13mm (0 - 1/2") DRILL CHUCK no2 morse taper | eBay
 

Tris

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Just my experience so far but I have a 0-16 mm capacity chuck and as far as I know it is a one piece arbour mount (no visible screw in the body). This has done everything I've needed as regards forstner and blacksmith type bits.
Might be worth waiting for someone with more engineering skills before taking the plunge though
 

Retired

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Hi,

Good luck Garno. Once you start into lathe tooling it can quickly become expensive.

I have a selection of Jacob chucks but mostly have ever used MT1 & MT2. I can use MT1 in my Record Power DML24" lathe but I can also use this same chuck in my Graduate with a sleeve fitted.

RDGTOOLS MORSE TAPER MT REDUCING DRILL SLEEVE WITH TANG ALL SIZES AVAILABLE | eBay

Sleeves come in lots of sizes; I've bought new and second hand from Rufforth Auto Jumble but they are common and not too expensive.

Arbour's too are readily available;


1613315121557.png



Obviously the larger the chuck you can fit into your lathe the larger the tooling it will hold. You can do a lot of work with the 0-1/2" Jacobs chuck.

Over the years I've just bought chucks as they've been available rather than trying to buy everything at once. I use Jacob chucks both in headstock and tailstock. If you do use sleeves you'll also need a suitable drift


1613315049765.png


Kind regards, Colin.
 

Doug B

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If you’re new to this @Garno you may also want a drawbar to safely use your Jacob’s Chuck & morse taper depending on what you are intending to use it for.
 

Paul Hannaby

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I would go for a 16mm chuck because they are bigger and more robust but bear in mind that some don't go down to zero - they might only go down to 3mm. This may or may not be an issue depending on what you use it for but you can also buy a pin chuck to use in a bigger chuck for smaller drill bits so you get the best of both worlds!

As pointed out - you can buy the arbour in the appropriate Jacobs taper to fit the chuck. The drift might come in useful if you ever use a morse taper adapter.

Drawbars are useful for some applications but not all arbours are drilled and threaded to take a drawbar.
 

marcros

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the one that you linked to looked good. make sure it comes with the chuck key or you will spend some time and a few quid chasing down a decent on etc fit. the cheap ones are usually useless.

if you want new, I find either arc trade or rdg tools to be as good as any. Given the choice I would probably go for used Jacobs brand rather than new,

as long as it is in the tailstock, rather than the headstock I wouldn't bother with a drawbar. there is a technique to using them and I have one hand on the Jacobs chuck and the other winding it in. I also have a rubber mallet to seat it properly when putting the Jacobs into the taper.
 

stevek

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some don't go down to zero - they might only go down to 3mm. This may or may not be an issue depending on what you use it for but you can also buy a pin chuck to use in a bigger chuck for smaller drill bits so you get the best of both worlds!
I have this problem, most of the time its not an issue then you discover that a very small drill will not be gripped, I was wondering about trying a pin chuck ( I call them “pin vices”,,dont know why though?) but held back because I was concerned that they might not run true,,has anyone tried? I also thought about the little chucks Im sure Ive seen somewhere that have a screwdriver bit style hex shaft, I ought to add that Im not doing high precision engineering though.
Steve.
 

chaoticbob

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I have this problem, most of the time its not an issue then you discover that a very small drill will not be gripped, I was wondering about trying a pin chuck ( I call them “pin vices”,,dont know why though?) but held back because I was concerned that they might not run true,,has anyone tried? I also thought about the little chucks Im sure Ive seen somewhere that have a screwdriver bit style hex shaft, I ought to add that Im not doing high precision engineering though.
Steve.

You can get a 0.4-4mm Jacobs style chuck for £7 from ARC Eurotrade and an arbor to match for a further fiver. I suspect that would be more accurate than any 'chuck in a chuck' arrangement unless they were both very well made.

The chuck Garno linked to at the top of the thread is almost certainly two-part - it's just being sold with the arbor already inserted into the chuck taper. Mostly people fit the parts together and leave them for years, so they get quite firmly attached to each other and can seem like a single unit. They can be separated though!
Rob.
 
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