Improving a frame and panel dining table

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ObservantGround28

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I bought a dining table a long time ago (prior to my interest in wood working) which I realised has table top which is of frame and panel construction (2 panels). It was bought from a oak furniture store and it's served us very well with one exception; The junction between the panels (about a 5mm rebate) and the frame is an absolute pain to clean and to keep clean. I understand the reason they've used this method.

Any suggestions? I'd like to see if I can keep it rather than replacing it real wood veneered MDF.

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Droogs

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Or some brass flat bar (see the recent thread) or clear resin with a powdered metal. some fumed wood to give a contrast or some inlay banding.

lots of options
 

ObservantGround28

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I had thought about resin, but my only concern is that wouldn't that essentially fix the panels in place and cause a problem with it cracking with wood movement of the frame or/and panel?
 

Cabinetman

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I had thought about resin, but my only concern is that wouldn't that essentially fix the panels in place and cause a problem with it cracking with wood movement of the frame or/and panel?
The frame is all lengthways on so that won’t move very much at all, and the panel is veneered MDF which is going to be virtually static in size so I think you could do as detailed above.
 

ObservantGround28

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The frame is all lengthways on so that won’t move very much at all, and the panel is veneered MDF which is going to be virtually static in size so I think you could do as detailed above.
The panels are edge laminated oak about 1/2" thick.

The whole thing is solid oak laminated to make the panels and the legs. The rest of it (stretchers, etc) is made up of single solid pieces.
 

Cabinetman

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Sorry I hadn’t understood, you mentioned veneered MDF and I thought that was what you meant by the construction of it, so no ignore everything I said. I don’t think you can put anything in there except for something very squishy indeed. Otherwise as you say it will cause a problem with cracking and breaking the outer frame joints.
Another alternative (which is probably not what you want to hear) is to cover the top with a piece of glass.
 

ObservantGround28

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Sorry I hadn’t understood, you mentioned veneered MDF and I thought that was what you meant by the construction of it, so no ignore everything I said. I don’t think you can put anything in there except for something very squishy indeed. Otherwise as you say it will cause a problem with cracking and breaking the outer frame joints.
Another alternative (which is probably not what you want to hear) is to cover the top with a piece of glass.
All good.

I think I've come to the same conclusions regarding a flexible filler or glass as well.
 
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