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Importance of safety

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Andy F

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When I was very very stupid I had a 10 second grinding job that "didn't need safety glasses".

You know when you get a splinter in your finger and you dig it out with a needle? Well that's exactly how the medical staff get metal splinters out of your eyeball.

I have many pairs of safety glasses scattered around my garage now so that there are always some in reach.
 

mynamehere

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Very lucky escape, I always wear my safety glasses when using fast spinny sharp bits, like Andy I've had one splinter picked out of my eye, another one had to be drilled out!
Is it not a quality issue for a router bit to break like that?
I've hit metal before with some of mine it would chew up the metal that was hit and the router bit would take a bit of damage, haven't had 'm break up like that though.

Cheers!

Ferenc
 

Mark Karacsonyi

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I can agree, Like my golden rule, unplug every machine when changing bits/blades etc.

I have a pair of glasses on every machine. Takes a second to put them on.

This has been my first encounter of the potential life changing moment.
 

Mark Karacsonyi

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Very lucky escape, I always wear my safety glasses when using fast spinny sharp bits, like Andy I've had one splinter picked out of my eye, another one had to be drilled out!
Is it not a quality issue for a router bit to break like that?
I've hit metal before with some of mine it would chew up the metal that was hit and the router bit would take a bit of damage, haven't had 'm break up like that though.

Cheers!

Ferenc
Actually Feri, it’s an Axminster bit. 2nd use too.

I was rebating out a piece of oak. The cutting depth was a hair over a 16th of an inch.

I was near the final depth of 5/8”, in a knot, when it went ping.
 

mynamehere

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So basically this could happen to anybody anytime with any router bit, "luckily" I have to wear glasses anyway and normally swap them for prescription safety ones when I go in t'shop.

Cheers!

Ferenc
 

novocaine

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close shave.
had a few myself over the years, now specs get put on when I'm in dangerous way. There's a pair by the door and a pair above the work bench.
 

TheUnicorn

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I used a leafblower to blow out my mower at the weekend, managed to get about 3 tiny bits of leaf caught in my eye within seconds of turning the thing on. Leaves are soft and that hurt like hell, I luckily have no idea what it feels like to get metal in my eye. It is so easy to underestimate the dangers of any tool. I always try and use glasses and ear defenders, the risk comes in those quick jobs when you don't think you need them, or when you are too rushed, but excuses won't save your eyesight.
 

XH558

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Just a thought, we only have 2 eyes. They are the most important part of our bodies that we take most for granted.
A few years ago we were on holiday in the Peak District and went to the Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester. They had an exhibition running on blindness. It was very tactile in that you were expected to walk around the exhibition that was in absolute darkness. So dark that it hurt your eyes straining to see ANYTHING. Having bumped into lots of stuff and having to learn very quickly to rely on other senses, it was a very humbling experience.

Look after your eyes. They still have not worked out how to replace the Mk1 eyeball.
 

NewbieRaf

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I could t agree more. I’m long sighted so need glasses for close ups. Safety first so I went ahead and paid almost 200 for prescription safety specs, I don’t regret the cost for one second.
 

okeydokey

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I have an small standard sized angle grinder, came in a steel case many years ago, the first thing I did was to put safety glasses in the case.
No excuse for not going to get some ...............they come out of the case before the tool!
 

sploo

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There's an old saying: "you can walk with a wooden leg, and chew with false teeth; but you can't see with a glass eye".

For less than a tenner you could litter your workshop in clear plastic safety specs (e.g. Clear Lens Overspecs) - do it!
 
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Steve Maskery

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My corneas used to belong to rwo other people. I am very grateful for their generosity and I take great care not to abuse their gifts.
I wear a pair of safety specs round my neck all the time, +1.5 or +2.0 depending on what I'm doing. I don't care if it does look a bit poncy, they are always there.
It does help actually NEEDING the magnification to see properly, I'll admit!
 

Steve Maskery

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BTW, if you buy prescription ones, make sure that they are not bifocals (unless that is what you want, of course). I ordered some thinking they were full lens, only to find they were bifocals. No mention of that in the product description. These are the ones I use. Recommended.
 

Jelly

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You know when you get a splinter in your finger and you dig it out with a needle? Well that's exactly how the medical staff get metal splinters out of your eyeball.
When I got my first job I remember my grandfather telling me the story of the apprentice in his department who decided he didn't need safety glasses when turning brass because it was so "soft".

Long story short, because he was the department head and had a driver's license from his RAF days, he dutifully took said apprentice to the hospital in the works van.

Upon explaining the incident, the doctor charged with treating this misadventure, said something to the effect of "We'd like to help ensure this never happens again, and I know just the thing" and sent one of the orderlies to get someone whilst they prepared for the [medically indicated] eye-gouging.

That someone was the Medical Photographer and his assistant, and following the apprentice being treated about a week later a pack of colour slides for each department in the factory were delivered in the post, marked "Safety Lecture Slides - Eye Splinter"

Apparently the showing of these slides narrated by the apprentice pictured in them resulted in an unprecedented uptake of safety glasses from everyone in the factory (the company provided them free, but at the time [late 60's I think] only apprentices were required to wear them).

Having seen a copy of the slides (via a viewer so not the full effect) I was very much convinced of the wisdom of wearing safety glasses.

Apparently after representations from my grandfather to the factory manager, the apprentice was not disciplined for ignoring the glasses rule on the grounds that it was unnecessary as "Even accounting for the stupidity of a boy fresh from school, no-one would submit themselves to that fate twice”.


I wear a pair of safety specs round my neck all the time, +1.5 or +2.0 depending on what I'm doing. I don't care if it does look a bit poncy, they are always there.
Whilst I don't need corrective lenses, I do the same, out of pure convenience.

I have three sets of relatively nice Peltor glasses with little retaining strings on them, one in the workshop, one in my PPE bag in the car, and one on a hook in my office at work, so they're always to hand.
 
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Droogs

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You can't get into my shop without banging into a pair of safety glasses as they live on a dangly "hook" that puts them right in your face level as you walk in the door and they only come off to be put back when leaving
 

johnny

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this is a good reminder about eye safety thank you for posting it. I have been getting very lax about wearing safety glasses since needing to wear reading glasses . its a faff having to keep changing glasses.

When I was in my early 20s I was working as a Plumber in the Tate & Lyle sugar factory in London. I was heating up an overhead copper fitting and smacking it with a hammer to knock it off of the pipe. Suddenly a shower of molten solder shot out of the fitting hitting me in the the eye and face.

Luckily Moorfields Eye Hospital was just down the road so I popped over there and they scraped the solder off my eyeball which had burnt into the cornea. Its not a sound that you forget in a hurry.
 

RichardG

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I‘ve just spent what seems like a small fortune on a pair of vari-focal safety specs. I found myself peering under the edge of my glasses! They work really well except when working overhead but that’s vari-focals for you. Wouldn’t be without them now.
 

Mark Karacsonyi

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@ Richard G,

I think I need to go down that road. Luckily here I can get them virtually free. Only if I can provide an eye exam and a doctors prescription.

I will do it tomorrow.
 
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