I'm worried about what people will think after I die...

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Droogs

Is that chisel shar ... Ow
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I***t is a verboten word on the forum. I have also had it changed to silly person. Not sure if thats supposed to cause less offence but thats the rule. Strange world we live in when words can be banned regardless of context.
Regards
John
My spell checker changes it to cockwomble, seems to work
 

Geoff_S

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There was a TV program on the other day with subtitles, I forget what it was. Anyway there was prolific use of the “F” word verbally. The fascinating thing was, you clearly heard the “F” word spoken every time but the subtitle presented it as “f**k”. A strange world we live in!
 

Ozi

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As possibly the worst student to ever graduate from the engineering course I was on, certainly had the maximum number of resits possible I always said if I "made it" I would leave money to the university on the condition that the Engineering student passing by the lowest margin receive a barrel of beer at the start of the summer holidays - aint gona happen
 

Amateur

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Agreed, persuaded my son start his pension at 19, he puts in about 8%. I didn't start properly till I was about 40 and now bundling it in to make up time.
I did the same but the way the world is maybe they will end up hating us all the same.
Ive found helping getting them a job becomes forcing them into something they didnt want to do, in their mind anyway if it all goes **** up.
 

Spectric

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The way things are you have to start thinking about later life a lot earlier these days and it is not just financial. If I was young the first thing I would look at is not buying a house or paying into a pension but asking myself the question " am I living in the best country that will give me a good career and lifestyle " and for me that would be a definate no in todays britain, I could do better elsewhere. If you do decide the UK is the right place then decisions are more difficult because some of the data is unknown, but you can say that you will probably not see a state pension until 75 but will have more than likely paid more NI contributions than you will ever see returned as pension, but a big thanks because you will be supporting us baby boomers. So do you really want to work to 75, if not then you need to start a private pension and throw a lot of money into it before thinking of a mortgage because getting a pot of pension money early gives it plenty of time to grow. Property is a massive expense and again don't just think of buying where you have always lived, accept that living too far south or near london is going to cost a lot more, yes you may earn more but the figure that is most important is not how much you earn but what you have left after paying everything. As to a job that is not going to be easy, but if you want a deposit for a pile of bricks then you may have to take a shiette job and work long hours but for plenty of cash, some delivery drivers up here earn a huge amount working long hours and seven days a week but may only do it for two or three years to get that deposit, doing a regular 9 to 5 it would take much more time.

Yes it is a minefield and with a lot of decisions to make, much harder for the youngsters of today because we no longer have all the large companies and places of employment with good opportunities and evidenced by the number of youngsters having to work in hospitality.
 

Amateur

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The way things are you have to start thinking about later life a lot earlier these days and it is not just financial. If I was young the first thing I would look at is not buying a house or paying into a pension but asking myself the question " am I living in the best country that will give me a good career and lifestyle " and for me that would be a definate no in todays britain, I could do better elsewhere. If you do decide the UK is the right place then decisions are more difficult because some of the data is unknown, but you can say that you will probably not see a state pension until 75 but will have more than likely paid more NI contributions than you will ever see returned as pension, but a big thanks because you will be supporting us baby boomers. So do you really want to work to 75, if not then you need to start a private pension and throw a lot of money into it before thinking of a mortgage because getting a pot of pension money early gives it plenty of time to grow. Property is a massive expense and again don't just think of buying where you have always lived, accept that living too far south or near london is going to cost a lot more, yes you may earn more but the figure that is most important is not how much you earn but what you have left after paying everything. As to a job that is not going to be easy, but if you want a deposit for a pile of bricks then you may have to take a shiette job and work long hours but for plenty of cash, some delivery drivers up here earn a huge amount working long hours and seven days a week but may only do it for two or three years to get that deposit, doing a regular 9 to 5 it would take much more time.

Yes it is a minefield and with a lot of decisions to make, much harder for the youngsters of today because we no longer have all the large companies and places of employment with good opportunities and evidenced by the number of youngsters having to work in hospitality.
The best country today is the worst country tomorrow.
Thats why we live in the uk as we know there is continuity.
At least you know its going to be bad and you can plan for it both now and in the future.
 

Amateur

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As Ive got old I realise that what you see happen, do or say, or discuss at anyone time is never the same as anyone elses recollections.
As people within family argue, it become more important to prove your point.
This results in telling the same story over and over again. However it becomes modified to their personal view bordering on lies to win support.
Eventually they believe the lies as the truth and so does everyone else they tell the story to.
And then you stand alone knowing what your version of the story is the truth.....or is it.?

I also belive today peer pressure from outside the home has a huge influence on your kids.
Not just other people but institutions as well.
 

Spectric

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I also belive today peer pressure from outside the home has a huge influence on your kids.
Social media and marketing telling them what they should do, think and look like, almost like making them into a collective. It is not good if you want diverse and free thinking people for the future.

As Ive got old I realise that what you see happen, do or say, or discuss at anyone time is never the same as anyone elses recollections.
It's called memory loss, nothing different to bit rot in semiconductor memory chips except you cannot be re-programed back to original.
 

Terry - Somerset

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I am picking 1960 as a datum as it may broadly represent the age of many on this forum to illustrate a point. The materially younger may consider their future holds should current trends continue.

In 1960 an average male at 65 could expect to live another 12 years. By 2020 this had grown to 19 years. Pension costs (whether state or personal) would increase by 60%.

In 1960 education typically continued to ~16. Few went to university, some did A levels. Typical age in education is now ~20. The working life during which savings for a pension could be accumulated have reduced from 49 (65-16) to 45 (65-20) - about 10%.

To provide a pension for those now retiring has increased in cost by ~70%. No wonder the state pension age is increasing, and will continue to do so while longevity increases.

We should all be grateful this is the case. Healthcare has improved and allowed us to enjoy many more years of quality life (on average, not all are so fortunate, some more so).

A fixed state pension age makes sense to avoid means and health testing, set at an age where most are still capable of gainful employment. Society as a whole, and the young in particular, should not be expected to fund the lifestyle of the entirely able retired.
 

Spectric

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We should all be grateful this is the case. Healthcare has improved and allowed us to enjoy many more years of quality life (on average, not all are so fortunate, some more so).
It is wonderful that health care has improved but that is only a benefit if it is applied, otherwise it is like having a heart attack whilst holding a defibrillator that you are unable to use. Round here the GP's are in crisis with some closing their doors for good and hospitals very under staffed but they did spend a lot of money modernising one of the hospitals so the staff had even more room to rattle around in because they just cannot recruit. On a positive note I do believe our ambulance service is doing ok unlike many others so the best option is to plan to retire early and at least get some reward for your working life.
 

Amateur

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Some good suggestions but,
While the population of the world increases and more people move to Europe a lot of those suggestions are not sustainable.
Governments work on the basis that revenues increase with rises in population without planning how these people will survive as they age.
Who will pay pensions and health care in the future is a major concern along with food production fuel and energy.
Boomers may block hospital beds today because rest homes and convalescent homes are full but it will be worse for the next generation.
That is a major worry and should be for everyone.
 

Amateur

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This is how they keep the numbers down and the riff raff out.
Who wants to be in an afterlife that looks like Butlins spring break ??

Only the believers get to go.
Im saying my prayers at night.
Just in case you understand?
 

D_W

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It is wonderful that health care has improved but that is only a benefit if it is applied, otherwise it is like having a heart attack whilst holding a defibrillator that you are unable to use. Round here the GP's are in crisis with some closing their doors for good and hospitals very under staffed but they did spend a lot of money modernising one of the hospitals so the staff had even more room to rattle around in because they just cannot recruit. On a positive note I do believe our ambulance service is doing ok unlike many others so the best option is to plan to retire early and at least get some reward for your working life.

well, you could be in the same boat as us - I can walk in to a huge number of clinics here, or go to my regular GP and get in same day. But we pay several multiples for it and get a lot of treatment that's probably not needed just because it's insured and everyone wants treatment no matter what instead of a wait and see approach.

cost of care is 20% of GDP here vs. I see a figure of 12.8%. GDP per capita is much higher here, so the real cost nominally is probably more than twice as much.

I'd take waiting now and then for half price.
 

Amateur

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Reality check.
The body breaks down as you age, no matter how healthy you think you are.
In the end despite technology it cant prevent that, nor can it prevent genetic throw backs in your DNA.
 

Spectric

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well, you could be in the same boat as us - I can walk in to a huge number of clinics here, or go to my regular GP and get in same day. But we pay several multiples for it and get a lot of treatment that's probably not needed just because it's insured and everyone wants treatment no matter what instead of a wait and see approach.
Opposites ends of the spectrum, you pay directly but get too much treatment and we pay indirectly and get treatment eventually, I suppose the one benefit of your system is that people don't just turn up with a cough, a splinter or the sick kid who is running round the waiting room causing mayhem, it makes them think rather than just turn up and overload the system. The one advantage of your system is that you must get more choice and unlike our NHS they are not guaranteed customers.
 

D_W

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Opposites ends of the spectrum, you pay directly but get too much treatment and we pay indirectly and get treatment eventually, I suppose the one benefit of your system is that people don't just turn up with a cough, a splinter or the sick kid who is running round the waiting room causing mayhem, it makes them think rather than just turn up and overload the system. The one advantage of your system is that you must get more choice and unlike our NHS they are not guaranteed customers.

Exactly right - too much treatment. that's the system's incentive here. We still do have waiting rooms here with non-payers, but the insured folks have now gotten a pretty robust setup of walk in places.

Uninsured folks with no money aren't too worried about the cost of an ER admission. The hospitals, at least here, can't make them pay at the point of service in the ER whereas non-ER walk-ins can refuse service for non-payers.

For me, copay for using the ER as point of service is $300. To use a walk-in care center is $25. if you have a true emergency, then the point of service copay at ER is $0. I have been to the ER exactly once in 20 years - metal in the eye, large hospital here. it was late at night and filled with weirdos in the city, but the hospital had two dedicated rooms for eye emergencies and I was back out in an hour. that was before the rise of walk-in centers, and the copay back then was only $50.

With the structure change now, if you have a simple break, the walk-in centers will X-ray and set it. If it's more complicated, they'll send you to the ER, and you'll be admitted for treatment rather than just seen quickly for outpatient (admission is the trigger that makes the cost go to $0).

The same overall outcomes could be had here for half the cost, but not the convenience. So I think we're paying double for convenience. I've gone to asking my dr. when they suggest something if the same outcome is had by waiting longer to see if anything is needed in the first place, and that to me is convenience. Not running all over the place fixing a problem that really isn't treated better by over-utilizing.

Something probably needs to change there. Something definitely needs to change here - both in different directions.

Once you're on Medicare here (65), life is pretty easy as far as cost goes, though. A couple of hundred bucks a month for coverage cost (instead of more than a thousand for an uninsured at 64 to go to the market and buy coverage) and you have no exposure to any catastrophic anything. Once in a while, people get stupid here and refuse to pay the medicare copay or enroll in anything that uses medicare, and the result is ruinous. It's rare here, though, and done only by the odd person who is exceptionally stupid.

The trouble with the idea that Medicare extended downward would cover everyone is that the health system is covered by the insured payers and Medicare can dictate paying less than the cost of actual care to health systems - who make up the difference with insured and cash payers.
 

imageel

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An interesting thread.... I by and large have gone through life without a care in the world medical-wise albeit along the way I have had numerous visits to our local A&E with self inflicted wounds down to the bone on both ring fingers which whilst not particularly painful bled a lot and then another excruciating one where I snapped the tendon attaching my bicep to my forearm....
...But then back in 2018 I had a fall - was on multiple BP lowering meds at the time and those were deemed likely root cause, I managed to pass out and fall down a flight of stairs and landed face down on a concrete floor. Lets just say there was lots of collateral damage and it took me 2y to get fully back to my normal woodworking/DIY activities - by day I worked in IT within financial services so not an issue there.
Since then I have become cognizant that at some point I'll either have to stop either through infirmity - arthritis is starting to affect some joints, or I'll go out like a light with some cardiac or body plumbing mishap.
The fact is that as you pass 50y the likelihood of serious diseases increases by some 50% so it really is all downhill internally however young and fit you may look or feel, the fact is we wear out, errors creep into our cellular replication, joints wear, blood vessels become less flexible and so-on.
Also as a life-long smoker and enjoyer of Rioja the medical profession see me as a higher than most risk, but at the end of the day we have to live, enjoy life and do the activities we like and get pleasure from and lets face it everything is a risk.
Tomorrow I am once again visiting our local hospital for about the 10th time this year - mainly because a friend I've known from teenage years has stage 4 cancer and even developed 2 new mets on his brain whilst undergoing immunotherapy - so I suspect tomorrows meeting will be a 'we propose withdrawing any treatment and fall back to palliative care only' - my mate is 69 so not brill but was diagnosed in mid Jan as being terminal I guess lucky to have survived this far!
I can't speak for my mate, however I don't really care that much about what others will think when I'm gone, most who know me well will know that I got a lot out of life doing woodworking, metal bashing, electronics, outdoor cooking and relaxing in the garden with a fag and a glass of something red.
I mean I believe when your gone your gone so not really much to worry about.....
I do wonder in the meantime what my daughter is going to do with my workshop and tools, grateful for any ideas as to how one might dispose of these!!
 
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