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Identity theft/ information security

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tim

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I have recently bought a fair amount of new kit as part of a long overdue upgrade/ replacement program and as a result have actually taken the time to fill out the various warranty cards. Previously I've always manged to leave it so that its past the first 30 days or lost the card etc etc :oops:

Anyway, I have noticed that the majority of these cards are simply that, postcards. Because most of these are also postage paid, there is a temptation to fill them out and stick them in the post box. Job done.

Then I realised that I was effectively announcing to anyone who cared to look, my name, address, possibly email address and phone number along with the obvious indicator that I had bought some new kit (and it was likely to be at the address detailed). Seemed a bit like putting your car reg details on your car keys.

I'm not one prone to scare mongering or over-caution on this sort of thing, nor do I think that the majority of the Royal Mail workforce are crooked but thought I'd just mention it and that it can all be hidden away for the price of a stamp.

Cheers


Tim
 

Terry Smart

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A good thought Tim...

Something else people should consider in these days of geneology - Family Trees to the likes of me - is that a popular security question is to ask your Mother's maiden name... this information can be far too freely available. I use a fictitous name when asked this question!

Makes you wonder, in these days of fewer people getting married (apparently)... this will become a redundant question eventually!
 

wizer

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With regard to the warranty post card. I always put it in an envelope and write the address on the front. If you wanted to take it a step further you could leave off the company name. As longe as the street address and post code is on there then it will get there. If it is freepost then just write the information on the envelope.

I keep meaning to buy a shredder. Sometimes I take things to work and shred them. I must say though that I have never heard of anyone local to me (friends, family, neighbours, etc) having their identity stolen.
 

trevtheturner

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Hi Tim,

A good point you raise there. If I decide to return a warranty card I always do the same as WIZer - post it in an envelope. I never post personal details free for anyone and everyone to see. And I only supply my e-mail address to those I want to have it, resulting in me rarely receiving spam mail. I don't disclose it to companies just because they ask for it, only when I need to and it is to my advantage not theirs.

When I look at the 'additional information' asked for I never give it - I am of the opinion that these cards are used really only for marketing purposes. Consider this - the warranty card is to be returned to the manufacturer, (often entering you into a 'free draw'!) but your contract is not with them, it is with the retailer from whom you made your purchase. Your protection here is the Sale of Goods Act and the warranty cards are, in effect, worthless.

I like your reasoning about Mum's maiden name Terry. :wink:

I do have a cheapo shredder through which all my discarded personal paperwork, and junk mail, e.g. the interminable invites for loans and credit cards, often containing personal details, goes on its way to mix with all the grass clippings, kitchen waste, etc., on the compost heap! :D

Cheers,

Trev.
 

tim

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Trev":ipf64vsd said:
When I look at the 'additional information' asked for I never give it - I am of the opinion that these cards are used really only for marketing purposes. Consider this - the warranty card is to be returned to the manufacturer, (often entering you into a 'free draw'!) but your contract is not with them, it is with the retailer from whom you made your purchase. Your protection here is the Sale of Goods Act and the warranty cards are, in effect, worthless.
Not always true - Bosch and Festool offer 3 year warranties if you return the card within a specified time, otherwise its a year.

BTW how did you know that my mum's name was Terry?

Cheers

T
 

trevtheturner

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Didn't know that your mum's name was Terry, Tim, but I do now! :lol: Just missed out a comma, that's all - something to do with the wine in the garden this afternoon no doubt. :roll:

I understand what you are saying about Bosch and Festool but, unless you have bought direct from them, you will not have any contract with them. The contract is always between you and the seller to you. You will also see in the terms of any warranty, usually in the small print: "this warranty does not affect your statutory rights" - but they never tell you what your statutory rights are! These are provided for in the Sale of Goods Act, which overrides any firm's 'warranty'. Usually no problem with a reputable firm, but the Act is very useful to resolve any dispute when you are in the right.

Oh, and BTW, how do we ever know whether the returned card has been received and registered, until we make a claim to be met with the response, "Sorry, nothing recorded here."? :shock:

Cheers,

Trev.
 
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