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will_s87

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Not sure what this would be called.....



However in the near future I have somewhere in the region of 10,000 13mm holes to drill into some ply, and they need to be as square as possible.

Has anyone seen these before?
Can I purchase a similar attachment for my cordless?

many thanks, Will.

Edit. What I'm looking for is a jig attachment for a drill that will allow me to consistently drill vertical holes... I guess that is what is depicted in the picture.

thanks again.
 

twothumbs

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Is it an adaption of a gadget (around twenty years ago) made to go on a drill to allow you to drill accurate holes at right angles? It was a hand held object with legs and a frame not unlike a router idea secured to the chuck. This doesnt look too different so could be one with additrional legs or handles made up to prevent you stooping. It was one of these ideas that suited a one of job. I doubt of they wer used very often. You could possibly work on this idea with a pipe clamp around chuck but how would you spring load or slide it. Photo looks as if it has a special chuck on it. Good luck
 

twothumbs

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Wolfcraft 4522 Tec Mobil Drill Stand is an example on amazon of what I was remembering.
 

will_s87

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Saviour. Thank you so much that is so helpful!

many thanks, Will.
 

will_s87

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having read the reviews I probably wont purchase one haha! thanks all the same bud..

Will
 

OPJ

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I have one of those Wolfcraft jigs and used it to drill the dog holes in my workbench top, two years ago:





It works pretty well. Obviously, it's not going to be as accurate as a pillar (although, I appreciate the impracticalities of those in some situations) but it did the job. If you're using a large, bulky or heavy drill, it can be quite easy to 'tilt' the drill slightly. Certainly, you don't want to push too hard; let the tool do all the work, as always. If you're using auger bits then, you may find (as I did) that the depth stop isn't strong enough to restrict the drilling depth if you go too far.
 

Shrubby

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I had a a similar problem - perpendicular holes in pieces too big for a Startrite drill
I copied the organbuilders. Buy a drill stand ,swing the pillar round 180º, mount 2 wooden battens underneath for support,put a heavy iron weight on the table casting
With 10,000 to drill have you looked at paying a CNC company?
Matt
 

toolmaniac

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My first router (which I've still got) was a Blacker & Decker - little black thing.
The router was not much use, but the motor and collet detached from the cradle on the base.

The hole in the cradle fits a B&D drill ( & maybe others), to give a meansof drilling perfectly vertical holes.
So, if you could find an old B&D router......................
 

will_s87

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Holes are to take T nuts, So they don't have to be mega accurate and I'm happy doing it by eye. But I will be getting a buddy to help me and I can't vouch for his interpretation of vertical!

I'll consider the drill attachment, although the B/D router jig sounds ideal!

thanks for your help, Will.
 

artfu1d0dger

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Does anyone know what the depth travel is on the Wolfcraft jigs, I need to drill numerous 3/4" holes to a depth of 3 inch. The pillar drills ive looked at only have a depth of 2" (50mm)

thanks
 

Digit

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I'm surprised that no one has mentioned what I consider to be the 'easy' way. Use a plunge router!

Roy.
 

Jacob

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artfu1d0dger":3bv2dyv8 said:
Does anyone know what the depth travel is on the Wolfcraft jigs, I need to drill numerous 3/4" holes to a depth of 3 inch. The pillar drills ive looked at only have a depth of 2" (50mm)

thanks
Then why not look at ones with 3" depth?
There are plenty of them about and not expensive either. Mine (Nutool) was £50 on ebay and does 85mm depth, or more of course if you work it against the table height
 

will_s87

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Any tips on where to find a jig with 3" or more of travel, I'm having trouble locating anything other than a variation of the wolfcraft style.

many thanks, Will.
 

Digit

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I take it that you intend drilling all the sheets simultaneously?

Roy.
 

AndyT

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will_s87":3un458g7 said:
Any tips on where to find a jig with 3" or more of travel, I'm having trouble locating anything other than a variation of the wolfcraft style.

many thanks, Will.
Rutlands have this



which they say has "a full 200mm of travel along the guide bars" but at an eye-watering price! £129.95!

I was so shocked that I've been down to the workshop and checked our old Black and Decker which is absolutely identical and cost (admittedly without the chuck) £3.99 according to its dusty old box.

B&D code was D946 which might help locate one on eBay.

But realistically, if you have loads of holes to drill, and they don't have to be super-spot-on, by the time you have finished, I reckon you will have learnt to drill straight!
 

John Brown

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http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00967173000P?prdNo=1&blockNo=1&blockType=G1

I have one I purchased at Sears in the US(if my memory serves). It has the built-in chuck like the Rutland one pictured. I think I paid around $30 for it.
It works OK for the minimal use I'll give it, but the chuck is a bit off-centre, and to be honest, I would have taken it back if I'd bought it in England.

I might have been unlucky, maybe I got a bad one... I see they have a slightly more expensive one listed now.

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00902540000P?prdNo=2&blockNo=2&blockType=G2


John
 

Tony Spear

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Axminster do one called (funnily enough) Axminster Drill Guide.

I used to have something similar, but I can't for the life of me remember the plunge depth, but I'm fairly sure that it has more plunge depth than 1/4" routers have.

It's highly unlikely that you'll be able to use your cordless with it as most cordless drills don't have the 43mm. collar that mains drills have.

However a good many inexpensive 1/4" routers have a removeable motor and collet assembly which uses the same 43mm. collar to attach it to the base.

Using a cheapish router means that you won't have half the plunge depth taken up with a damn great chuck. :wink:
 
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