I Sorby table vice

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Walter boy

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Hi all. I'm looking for some advice/info on an old vice that I found in my father-in-laws shed..? He can't remember where he got it from and was going to chuck it out for the scrap man because it was completely seized up and covered in rust. I don't know anything at all about vintage tools etc, but I thought this little vice was really cute and decided to bring it home and see if I could atleast getting working ...? Yesterday evening I smothered it with wd40 on any part that looked like it should move. I left it over night, and this morning there was still no movement. It was as solid as rock. But I don't give up easily. Before I left for work I blasted it with wd40 again. When I got home from work today I went to the shed and the big threaded part moved ever so slightly. So I kept spraying it with wd40 and wiggling it. A few light taps with a hammer all over the main body of the vice eventually freed it up completely. Once I'd wound the vice fully open I cut some 1" ribbons of emery cloth and wrapped it around one of the shafts that sit either side of the thread. I can best describe what I did with the Emery cloth as being similar to when you dry your back with a towel. It took only a minute or two to get both shafts completely rust free and shiny again. The thumb screw thingy that you use to attach it to a table was also freed up in no time at all. I'm really happy cos I now know for sure that I won't be wasting my time restoring this rusty old vice. But I can't find any info at all on this little I Sorby tool...? And although I'm not 100% certain,....it also looks like this little vice possibly swivels 360° cos there is another lug with a hole in it that obviously had a handle/rod going through it once upon a time, but it's missing and it's the only part that is still seized at the moment.
If any of you knowledgeable ladies and gentlemen can tell me something about this beautiful little vice and give me some advice on how I should go about restoring it,....it would be most appreciated.

I took these photos earlier cos I thought it might help you see what I'm going on about.

Thanks very much.

Respect..

Walter
 

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dannyr

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Hi all. I'm looking for some advice/info on an old vice that I found in my father-in-laws shed..? He can't remember where he got it from and was going to chuck it out for the scrap man because it was completely seized up and covered in rust. I don't know anything at all about vintage tools etc, but I thought this little vice was really cute and decided to bring it home and see if I could atleast getting working ...? Yesterday evening I smothered it with wd40 on any part that looked like it should move. I left it over night, and this morning there was still no movement. It was as solid as rock. But I don't give up easily. Before I left for work I blasted it with wd40 again. When I got home from work today I went to the shed and the big threaded part moved ever so slightly. So I kept spraying it with wd40 and wiggling it. A few light taps with a hammer all over the main body of the vice eventually freed it up completely. Once I'd wound the vice fully open I cut some 1" ribbons of emery cloth and wrapped it around one of the shafts that sit either side of the thread. I can best describe what I did with the Emery cloth as being similar to when you dry your back with a towel. It took only a minute or two to get both shafts completely rust free and shiny again. The thumb screw thingy that you use to attach it to a table was also freed up in no time at all. I'm really happy cos I now know for sure that I won't be wasting my time restoring this rusty old vice. But I can't find any info at all on this little I Sorby tool...? And although I'm not 100% certain,....it also looks like this little vice possibly swivels 360° cos there is another lug with a hole in it that obviously had a handle/rod going through it once upon a time, but it's missing and it's the only part that is still seized at the moment.
If any of you knowledgeable ladies and gentlemen can tell me something about this beautiful little vice and give me some advice on how I should go about restoring it,....it would be most appreciated.

I took these photos earlier cos I thought it might help you see what I'm going on about.

Thanks very much.

Respect..

Walter


Nice.

Well done 'unseizing' -- yes it does look like swivel, and swivels are notorious for sticking tight keep at it , tap, oil tap oil wallop etc.

Marples had a very similar clamp on maybe from the same source (anyone know if I Sorby was one of the brands they acquired?) but I didn't remember it being a swivel.

Ps the I is John
 

Walter boy

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Nice.

Well done 'unseizing' -- yes it does look like swivel, and swivels are notorious for sticking tight keep at it , tap, oil tap oil wallop etc.

Marples had a very similar clamp on maybe from the same source (anyone know if I Sorby was one of the brands they acquired?) but I didn't remember it being a swivel.

Ps the I is John
Cheers Danny. Much appreciated mate. This is a good start for sure. I've taken onboard what you've said, and cos of that I've now got a bit more info I work with. It's back in the shed, and I've given the "swivel" area another bath in wd40. When I get home from work tomorrow I'll give it a few more taps/whacks with the hammer, and fingers crossed I'll get a bit of movement mate. I don't give up on things like this latest project. I'll let you know how it goes Danny.. cheers mate. Nice one.
 

okeydokey

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Have you tried to ease the swivel lock - the part with the lug and missing bar - a large round screwdriver or steel bar would do then if it turns the lock might undue and the swivel might.
I had a similar seized item some while back and used a blowlamp to get it hot - not silly hot and it helped crack the rusted together joint. Due to the WD a job tackled outside or the fumes wont be fun.
 

Chisteve

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Looks a nice little swivel vice

To help get hold of a wire brush and clean it up including threads as much as you can keep adding wd40 should free up and clean up nicely
 
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