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I don't have much luck with jigsaws!

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thikone

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Interestingly, no one says anything about direction of cut here.

I also didn't have much luck with my corded jigsaw. It would cut alright 8 mm floor laminate. And cross cut pine and beech.
But would completely stop cutting when ripping. When I wanted to rip 60 mm pine - I couldn't cut even 100 mm!

If I look at the blades that I have, they all seems to be sharpened for cross cut.

Maybe you have similar problem?
 

Inspector

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I have a corded Makita barrel grip that works well. Top handle version is also good if you prefer that style. One thing you need to do is make sure you have the appropriate blade for the job at hand and experience dictates, having lots of spares so you won’t need them. Buy good blades as cheaping out is false economy.
 

glenfield2

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I’m interested in any tips on cutting curves, especially in plywood. My frustration is that the blade bends so the cut goes out of vertical.
 

stuart little

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I was going to say it always seems to be right at the end when you find a piece is missing, but it's the other kind of jigsaw. I have had a couple of them over the years but really don't like using them. With thick wood, I follow the line on the top, but the cut is all over the place on the bottom.
The barrel grip is probably the best, I find the top handle a bit on the wobbly side.
The best jigsaw I've ever had was an Elu (barrel grip), which lasted from late '70's to early 'naughties', when it virtually self-combusted. I replaced it with a DW18v, which serves it's purpose.
 

Keith 66

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Bosch, I bought my first one in 1983 & used it in my boatbuilding career until about 8 years ago when i got a newer version. Both are still going, Good quality sharp blades suited to the job.
 

David Young

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Reading through most of this thread people are struggling with their jigsaws. The common denominator is that I think the sweep action isn't being used. Also don't force a jigsaw, you're using a power tool instead of a handsaw. Let the tool do the work.
Hopefully this will help.
Happy Jigsawing folks. D
 

JobandKnock

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Deep, vertical cuts in thick materials - the only saw I have ever used that can accomplish this is the Mafell P1cc with their double thickness W1 blade. It also cuts well in a straight line, but it's no circular saw. Next best are the saws with extra guides, e.g. later Festo/Festools, Bosch GST135/140/160.

As others have said is a great deal of help if you buy a quality blade rather than a cheap one, and if you choose a blade made for the job with the right number if teeth (too many teeth encourages scorching and wander), however jigsaws are far from ideal for straight cutting. Don't run blades until they are dull as they wander - when using a cordless jigsaw you realise how quickly that happens

If good surface finish is required cut from the underside or at least use an anti splinter insert. Orbit is great for speed but dreadful for quality of cut. Avoid downcut blades like the T101BR as they wander about at the drop of a hat (think about how Japanese saws work, and how upcut jigsaw blades work, in tension)

If you've been using a blade to cut curves, swap to a fresh one if you need to do straight cuts. Jigsaw blades take on a "biased" set if used on tight curve cuts and never cut straight thereafter

If you want to know how coarse a blade you can get away with, take a look at the Bosch T244D. Really coarse, lots of side set, but it's about the best blade you can get for scribing work on infills, skirtings, mouldings, etc. It may seem counter-intuitive, but it works even better if combined with a Collins Coping Foot and a more basic saw (one without a secondary blade guide)

0017_cutting_1.jpg
 
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baldkev

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One of the best blades ive used for curves in oak was the festool fine blade. It looks like an upcut with teeth at about 90° to the blade, but both top surface and underneath were very cleanly cut....
 

foulisle

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I have a Bosch 110 volt that I have had since the early 1990s, it is the most useful tool I own, just make sure you have sharp blades the right amount of "sweep" and slow rather than fast speeds. Have used this saw on every job from Pitching roof's to constructing and fitting out commercial fishing boats it is my go too saw.
 

jonn

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Interestingly, no one says anything about direction of cut here.

I also didn't have much luck with my corded jigsaw. It would cut alright 8 mm floor laminate. And cross cut pine and beech.
But would completely stop cutting when ripping. When I wanted to rip 60 mm pine - I couldn't cut even 100 mm!

If I look at the blades that I have, they all seems to be sharpened for cross cut.

Maybe you have similar problem?
These old Bosch pro jigsaws are the best! Bought mine in 1982, and it's still going like when new. A no-nonsense saw, Swiss made, where little goes wrong. Expensive? Yes, but definitely a case of quality shining through when price is long forgotten.
Newer models have all this stuff to 'make them easier to use', but with these old ones just keep going. But like with all jigsaws, cutting curves in thick material ain't brilliant. For that you need a bandsaw.
1631776603094.png
 

hlvd

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Interestingly, no one says anything about direction of cut here.

I also didn't have much luck with my corded jigsaw. It would cut alright 8 mm floor laminate. And cross cut pine and beech.
But would completely stop cutting when ripping. When I wanted to rip 60 mm pine - I couldn't cut even 100 mm!

If I look at the blades that I have, they all seems to be sharpened for cross cut.

Maybe you have similar problem?
Ripping 60mm pine isn’t something to be done with a jigsaw, let alone 100mm
 

Phil Pascoe

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Of course no one would rip 60mm stuff with a jigsaw by choice, but on occasion there's no reason why a decent saw with a well chosen - new - blade shouldn't do it.
 
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hlvd

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Of course no one would rip 60mm stuff with a jigsaw by choice, but on occasion there's no reason why a decent saw with a well chosen - new - blade shouldn't do it.
Only as a last resort as the bottom of the cut will be all over the place.
 

Phil Pascoe

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I've done it many times, the blade rarely wanders much. I wouldn't do it for accurate work but for rough joinery when there's no other option it's usually OK.
 
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