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Essex Barn Workshop

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Hi. iI've been asked to transform a large but low eucalyptus coffee table into a dining table, so far so good.

Had a look this morning, and the ornate legs are solidly attached, I assume there will be a central threaded rod into an inset nut or similar, and then glued:

1643738426970.png


Even with as much twisting force as I could manage there wasn't the slightest hint of a rotational movement, and every foot is, to a lesser or larger degree, split like this one shown.

The piece of wood it goes into is solid and integral to the table, and I can see dowels.

My fear is that applying enough force to break the glue bond would split the feet (which need to be preserved as they want them at the base of the new legs I will make).

Not a local item, bought 20 years ago in Australia from a local maker.

How would you go about freeing those feet? I have considered a jigsaw to cut them off, but it would need a long reach. I would anticipate fixing the new legs with glue and 4 x dowels
 

PerryGunn

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Assuming any cut surface will be covered by the new legs, and there's definitely not any metal in the joint, I'd probably try cutting them off using something like a kugihiki (a backless Japanese saw with zero set)
 

dzj

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Try a metal detector to see if your hunch about the threaded rod is correct.
If the legs are doweled to the base, insert a thin saw blade and cut away the dowels, as said above.
 

MARK.B.

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I was going to say it was possible that the legs had a turned thread and were screwed in :unsure::unsure: but then you said about seeing Dowels so that thought went down the pan :LOL: but the dowels will be why you cannot twist it , if enough space just run the blade of a hack saw through the dowels and if you come across a threaded rod then it will just take a few mins longer to cut . Trying to twist or force them off is only likely to cause the splits to become worse:eek:as they are, some cryo watchamacallit glue run into those cracks sooner rather than later may save you some time and grief later on :)
 

HOJ

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I'm with MikeK looks like all one piece, with the split continuing thru, with an applied moulding around the square to turned leg transition.

Fine set saw job.
 

Woody2Shoes

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Looking at your photo, I think that the whole leg (both the turned bottom section and the square section above it) has been made by gluing two boards together e.g. two 4x2 to make one 4x4. I think the turned part and the square part are all part of the same two pieces of wood. There is a moulding around the bottom of the square part of course.
If I'm right, then sawing would be the only way to separate the turned section from the square section.
 

Sheptonphil

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At least you have a decent shoulder to guide the Japanese saw against.

Should be an easy removal, but I can see the feet falling apart in two when removed. The split running up through should allow for a good rough split pattern to glue and rejoin without showing.
 

niall Y

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Hi. iI've been asked to transform a large but low eucalyptus coffee table into a dining table, so far so good.

Had a look this morning, and the ornate legs are solidly attached, I assume there will be a central threaded rod into an inset nut or similar, and then glued:

View attachment 128443

Even with as much twisting force as I could manage there wasn't the slightest hint of a rotational movement, and every foot is, to a lesser or larger degree, split like this one shown.

The piece of wood it goes into is solid and integral to the table, and I can see dowels.

My fear is that applying enough force to break the glue bond would split the feet (which need to be preserved as they want them at the base of the new legs I will make).

Not a local item, bought 20 years ago in Australia from a local maker.

How would you go about freeing those feet? I have considered a jigsaw to cut them off, but it would need a long reach. I would anticipate fixing the new legs with glue and 4 x dowels
Hi, I would tend to agree with the observation , that the legs are made up of two piece glued side to side, and are one continuous length. I would tackle the job as I would, when fixing a new newel post to an old stairs. Firstly cut off the leg at the square section, and turn a new leg forming a dowel at the top. The drill out a hole in the square section to accept this.
I would try and dissuade the customer from using the old leg sections, otherwise you will have to repair and dowel these. as per the top fixing. Instead I would offer to incorporate the turned detail in the design of the new leg. A couple of screws fixed in the square at the top of each leg should help stop the glued sections from further splitting apart.
Best of luck.
 
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