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How would you go about creating something like this?

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seanf

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As I'm getting more into woodworking I find myself looking at furniture in shops and thinking about how I might go about recreating pieces that I like. I was looking at the below chest of drawers (and the price!) in Next recently and thinking about how I would create the side supports (for want of a better word, but the long vertical pieces as at the right of the price label). If the carcass was to be ply or MRMDF would you also make these supports from the same material or would you use solid timber of some sort? How concerned would you be for wood movement if mixing man made and solid timbers? Any other thoughts on how you would approach a piece of this style would also be very appreciated

Thanks

Sean

8942BBBA-234F-43A1-B339-A42FC42E6219.jpeg
 

dzj

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I'm just guessing, but it looks like you have only 3 sticks of wood there. The rest is all painted/ veneered mdf.
 

Yojevol

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Some not very useful comments so far.
This is a basic cabinet construction and if you are wanting to get into good woodworking design and techniques I suggest a start by googling 'Chest of Drawers Construction Plans' and you come up with things like this:-
chest of drawers.jpg

which will give some idea on the way to proceed.
Brian
 

Woody2Shoes

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Rather than obtaining/studying plans, I find the most informative thing is to study some actual furniture.

Do you (or someone you know) own a chest of drawers or other comparable furniture, similar to what you want to build? If so, remove drawers (the drawers, not your drawers o_O) and inspect closely from as many angles as possible. Many of the detailed design decisions are directly driven by which materials are used where - as well as cost and available technology.

I have been known to study items of furniture in shops/salerooms (but not yet museums!) in this way too.
 

Jacob

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The original item is made to resemble a trad chest of drawers and most likely be not worth trying to copy the details. Have to look at the real thing - it's a very common design with framed and panelled sides instead of solid wood. Lovejoy's example above also not very trad, but getting closer.
If you can't find the real thing the best place to look is the Ernest Joyce book or others of that era.
 

Woody2Shoes

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PS, I wouldn't be overly shy of using ply/MDF together with solid timber - but would design/detail to allow for movement of the solid.
 

dzj

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Joyce suggests gluing plywood in grooves when making flush paneled doors.
I've done it this way also with both mdf and ply many times without any troubles. The wooden frame would have a 10-12mm groove and stub tenons.
The better factory made kitchen doors ( :) ) are often made in this way also. On the low end ones they couldn't be bothered to use glue,
hoping it will fall apart in a year or 2 so you go and buy a new one.
Of course, if you are considering solid stock for the panel, glue is not an option.
 

artie

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I was looking at the below chest of drawers (and the price!) in Next recently and thinking about how I would create
If your intention is to hone your woodwork and planning skills, there are many on this forum much more knowledgeable than I.

If your intention is to get value for money. Buy it in Next. :)
 

TheTiddles

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Second hand units like that are available on online marketplaces regularly for very little, some paint and effort is all it’ll cost you.

Making something like that half-decently,£230’ish? A sheet of 12mm ply for the drawers, 18mm for the carcass, poplar frame and features, oak and veneer for the top (+ tools and ability)

Built as per the above
 

seanf

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Thank you all for the feedback (and jokes!) so far. Good to see I am not alone in trying to pick apart designs when at the shops

If your intention is to get value for money. Buy it in Next. :)
😄 Yes, I have long since discovered that making it yourself is seldom the wallet friendly way. It is far more about having an enjoyable hobby that gets me on my feet after sitting down all week for work

Sean
 

seanf

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which will give some idea on the way to proceed.
Brian
Very helpful as always, thank you. Your diagram matches pretty well with how I took this apart in my head so that is encouraging. My worries about mixing natural and man made products were holding me back on actually thinking about starting something like this. I will keep planning and start with a smaller, simpler version I think to test things out

Sean
 

againstthegrain

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My father taught himself traditional cabinet-making techniques and then made furniture for his home. That is many years ago, but we still use his furniture every day - in our home, in my sister's home in my daughter's home etc. It is a testament to him and his care - a lovely way of remembering a wonderful man!
 

CaptainBudget

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I would purchase a copy of Hilton's "Illustrated Cabinetmaking" from your book-merchant of choice.

This will give you a good understanding of the fundamentals around casework design (why you'd use certain joints and their limitations), as well as showing how a lot of traditional furniture was designed, complete with exploded illustrations like that shown by Lovejoy. Well worth a purchase.
 

pils

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I would purchase a copy of Hilton's "Illustrated Cabinetmaking" from your book-merchant of choice.

This will give you a good understanding of the fundamentals around casework design (why you'd use certain joints and their limitations), as well as showing how a lot of traditional furniture was designed, complete with exploded illustrations like that shown by Lovejoy. Well worth a purchase.
FYI: Illustrated Cabinetmaking by Bill Hylton - Ebook | Scribd
 

houtslager

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Thank you all for the feedback (and jokes!) so far. Good to see I am not alone in trying to pick apart designs when at the shops

😄 Yes, I have long since discovered that making it yourself is seldom the wallet friendly way. It is far more about having an enjoyable hobby that gets me on my feet after sitting down all week for work

Sean
But one gets to buy more toys (ahem tools) when the design committee approves the design 😁
 
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