How To Make This Wedge Holding System?

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pollys13

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I'm doing some woodcarving, doing the project in the screenshot. I'm not sure how I go about making the wedges and supporting piece of timber for the wedges? I have a bandsaw and an electric mitre saw, can someone explain what I need to do?
Thanks.
 

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Ttrees

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Make the shape you want freehand on the bandsaw, using something like below,
apart for obviously having a jointed face and edge on the scrap like one would expect for use with a fence, as it seems whoever pictured below doesn't own a plane of some sort.
Not even a hint of a pushstick either, terrible picture really.

Crosscut a short section of wedge material, simply flipping it around makes identical wedges.
 

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Phill05

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Hi Polly13,
Not hard to do cut a straight piece as long as you need it I have drawn 300mm long X 22mm does not matter the angle of the cut or the wedge.

image_2022-05-04_112527940.png
 

pollys13

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Make the shape you want freehand on the bandsaw, using something like below,
apart for obviously having a jointed face and edge on the scrap like one would expect for use with a fence, as it seems whoever pictured below doesn't own a plane of some sort.
Not even a hint of a pushstick either, terrible picture really.

Crosscut a short section of wedge material, simply flipping it around makes identical wedges.
Hi,
I know about how to cut wedges using the bandsaw but I wasn't sure about fitting into the supporting timber. I'm sort of thinking, don't the wedges need to be longer than cutting off the pioece of timber and get banged into hold the wood. I'm thinking the wedges wouldn't be long enough, as banged in, hence my confusion. I might have this all wrong but anyway :)
 

Orraloon

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Do it just like the picture. The bits cut off the front fence becone the wedges. That way the holding side of those wedges is parallel to that fence. Tip to remember with wedges is thin (low angle) ones hold better than thick(high angle) wedges.
Regards
John
 

baldkev

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Do it just like the picture. The bits cut off the front fence becone the wedges. That way the holding side of those wedges is parallel to that fence. Tip to remember with wedges is thin (low angle) ones hold better than thick(high angle) wedges.
Regards
John

What pollys13 was aiming at, i think, is that if you cut the wedges from the rectangle to gain both the shaped piece and wedges, the wedges ( to tighten to the workpiece as there'll be a small gap ) would go in past the edges of the shaped piece.
Of course you just cut the original shaped piece 2" longer than needed, cut the wedges out, then cut an inch off each side of the shaped piece.
 

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Orraloon

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What pollys13 was aiming at, i think, is that if you cut the wedges from the rectangle to gain both the shaped piece and wedges, the wedges ( to tighten to the workpiece as there'll be a small gap ) would go in past the edges of the shaped piece.
Of course you just cut the original shaped piece 2" longer than needed, cut the wedges out, then cut an inch off each side of the shaped piece.
Looking at the OPs picture I would say it was done like you say in the last sentence.
Regards
John
 

Adam W.

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I do a bit of woodcarving and use a similar work holding jig sometimes, except I do not trap the piece on all four edges, but hold it in a U or L shaped frame with the rear edge open and carve into the corners. That way I can easily take the piece out and flip it around to account for the change in the direction in grain.
 

pollys13

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I do a bit of woodcarving and use a similar work holding jig sometimes, except I do not trap the piece on all four edges, but hold it in a U or L shaped frame with the rear edge open and carve into the corners. That way I can easily take the piece out and flip it around to account for the change in the direction in grain.
Thanks.
 

pollys13

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What pollys13 was aiming at, i think, is that if you cut the wedges from the rectangle to gain both the shaped piece and wedges, the wedges ( to tighten to the workpiece as there'll be a small gap ) would go in past the edges of the shaped piece.
Of course you just cut the original shaped piece 2" longer than needed, cut the wedges out, then cut an inch off each side of the shaped piece.
Yes, you grasped exactly, why I was confused and explained the solution, great, thanks :)
 
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