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how to cut fiberbord and get half descent straight/square fi

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micks

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hi all was trying to cut an offcut of the white fiberboard/ melamine as sold by the likes of bq/whicks the stuff that is used for kitchen base units shelfs etc and is coated either side with white finish.

size wanted was 100mm x 400mm used tenon saw to cut ends but the white coating chipped on underside of cut.

used a jigsaw clamped in workbench with blade upright a straight batton and fed stock into blade but found the jigsaw blade just veered of and could not get a straight descent cut.

not having a sawbench what do members use to cut such items and get at least a half descent cut finish. without going to say bq and get items cut to required size, have no transport.

thanks all
 

tim

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Mick

Basically its difficult. The simplest way to give yourself the best chance of not getting chipping is to use the sharpest blade possible and score the cutline on both sides of the panel with a sharp knife first. Even then its no guarantee. Sometimes it can help to clamp another sacrificial piece of timber to the piece to minimise chipping.

The blade deflection on your jigsaw may be down to a whole host of reasons: blade not sharp enough, speed of cut to fast and quality of tool - the most expensive jigsaws are so pricy because one of the benefits they offer is limited blade deflection. That said most jigsaws aren't really designed to be used as a makeshift bandsaw - I'd use it the right way up, clamp the straight edge offset as you need to get the blade on the cutline and go for it slowly. If one side is not needed to be seen then a downcut blade might be a good investment (although not just for one piece!)

Hope this helps

Tim
 

radicalwood

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Hi Mick,

I have just been re-fitting my kitchen so have had the same problem. I used a japanese pull saw (silky I think) to cut the worktops and shelves to fit. There was no noticeable chipping on either. I trimmed the worktops flush with the cabinets after fitting, working surface up. Its worth a try saw is about £30 but will be used a lot ones bought don't even reach for another saw for most things.

All the best

Neil
 

micks

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thanks all blade in jigsaw was normal general purpous one rather long did see in a mag that short fine metal cutting blade would be more suitable but did not have one to hand.

not heard of a try saw

thanks all
 

CHJ

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My normal practice is to cut slightly oversize and run it past a straight cutter on the router table with fence set in planer mode.

If it is to big for router table then use freehand router with clamped guide fence of some description to shave off last 1-2 mm.

End up with both side coatings unchipped and square edge to board.
 

micks

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thanks chj
i acctually purchased a trend t3 and a set of draper 1/4" router bits recently for the purpous of routing the small groove in kitchen drawer that takes the hardbord bottom.and possible try some window sill shelves and the like.

having decided to get a book on (routing) to see how one is used ,been a bit wary, have only got old portable workbench but the top is bowed so clamping anything to it can be slightly unsafe, it was my original idea to use workbench to hold items of stock and then route but think this might be unsafe as the workbench is not really that stable.

hence have not tried out router at all , been pondering wether to make a router table/support but a bit hampered for space having only a small shed no garage,
 
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