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How do you decide/justify a new lathe upgrade?

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Sachakins

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Bit of an off the wall question, but what made you decide to upgrade your lathe.
I have been researching upgrading from my old Record Power DML36SH.
With plenty of help in these forums I had settled on a new a new Coronet Herald.
Suddenly I am not sure, not about the lathe, but is there any gain in upgrading?
Bigger bowls, faster speeds, variable speed control etc etc
I know that's what I'll get,
but will I need it to keep enjoying hobby turning, or,
do I need it to keep enjoying hobby turning?
(Now I have just written that thought down, sounds a bit Zen like statement)

Just wondered what thoughts or jitters you had before upgrading to another lathe, new or used?
 

Trainee neophyte

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Sachakins":30locn7d said:
Bit of an off the wall question, but what made you decide to upgrade your lathe.
I have been researching upgrading from my old Record Power DML36SH.
With plenty of help in these forums I had settled on a new a new Coronet Herald.
Suddenly I am not sure, not about the lathe, but is there any gain in upgrading?
Bigger bowls, faster speeds, variable speed control etc etc
I know that's what I'll get,
but will I need it to keep enjoying hobby turning, or,
do I need it to keep enjoying hobby turning?
(Now I have just written that thought down, sounds a bit Zen like statement)

Just wondered what thoughts or jitters you had before upgrading to another lathe, new or used?
Are you going to keep the old one, and have two lathes? That way you would have no fear of losing your current abilities, but would just gain more options. It takes me 6-12 months of procrastination and deliberation before i spend money on frivolous purchases (i.e. anything not food or work necessary). Usually it is only when everyone else in the house shouts at me - "Just buy it and stop torturing us all with the pros and cons!"

I'm not a turner, because I am scared of the addiction possibilities - it's on the list of things to do, but not yet...you need to give in to your addiction, and feed the beast - get the biggest, fastest, most impressive upgrade you can possibly afford, but don't sell the old one - you can never have too many clamps (or lathes).
 

Distinterior

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Sachakins":1pbknp7d said:
Bit of an off the wall question, but what made you decide to upgrade your lathe.
I have been researching upgrading from my old Record Power DML36SH.
With plenty of help in these forums I had settled on a new a new Coronet Herald.
Suddenly I am not sure, not about the lathe, but is there any gain in upgrading?
Bigger bowls, faster speeds, variable speed control etc etc
I know that's what I'll get,
but will I need it to keep enjoying hobby turning, or,
do I need it to keep enjoying hobby turning?
(Now I have just written that thought down, sounds a bit Zen like statement)

Just wondered what thoughts or jitters you had before upgrading to another lathe, new or used?
I've asked myself the same question on a couple of occasions and, coincidentally, about the same DML36SH lathe....Ive had mine from new for 15 trouble free years and it has met my needs 90% of the time but on the odd occasion I wish it had electronic variable speed, shorter bed bars, was more stable ,had a higher swing and more power....

I have never needed the 36" length for turning anything that long.

The ability to turn larger diameter bowls is the one thing that I really wanted, so I bought the bowl turning extension for mine and it works, but that in turn does highlight the lack of power of the motor & stability of the lathe when I start swinging heavier, out of balance lumps of wood at 90 degrees to the bed bars. The motor does get b l o o d y hot as well.....after an hour or so of turning even a small 200mm dia bowl, the motor is too hot to touch. Still runs fine though.

When I see guys on YouTube turning way out of balance pieces of wood and their Lathes are hardly vibrating at all, ...it does make me think about upgrading.
 

kevinlightfoot

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My first lathe was a Tyme Cub.My wife bought it for my Christmas present,I think the year was 1983,It lasted about six months before I outgrew it.I decided that I was going to upgrade so I bought the best available at the time.Ibought a Graduate 54" bed lathe from LRE machinery still using the same lathe today.I also bought a short bed Graduate from the same people .Never had variable speed and never had the need for it.I have turned thousands of spindles and newel posts as well as long pillars by bolting the two lathes together in line using one of the lathes as a revolving centre,buy the biggest and heaviest you can afford so you don't have to upgrade again.I could still sell my lathes for the price I paid for them ,I don't think you could say that about most of the Woodturning lathes you see for sale today.Buy the best and it's like money in the bank.
 

Lonsdale73

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I've not long got my lathe. It was the cheaper of two models I'd been considering - a Record Power DML250 - and I was offered it at such a good price I figured that if I didn't take to it then I should be able to recover most of that outlay without losing too much money. It didn't take long before I started thinking "What if..."

I've had two opportunities immediately prior to lockdown to have a go on the dearer model - DML320 - and of course I WANT one of those. Truth is, the DML250 capabilities far outstrip my current abilities. I'm having to glue scraps of wood together to give me something - anything - to practice on, learning how to hold the tools without injury. I still keep eyeing up the 320, seduced by its variable speed and larger bowl capacity despite not having used any more than one speed on the 250 and so farnot even been able to get a bowl blank that's too big for the 250. If Record Power were to offer me one tomorrow then damned right I'd snatch their hand off but for now, I think the cost of upgrading would be better spent on materials and if/when my abilities outstrip my current machine's capabilities then that's maybe the time to consider an upgrade.

In all other areas, I find that if I'm questioning a decision to upgade then I probably don't need to do so. The TV, for example. Mines is around 15 years old but a newer, smarter one would still only show the same channels and the same rubbish programs. Similarly, my phone is six or seven years old now, I hardly ever make or receive calls so don't feel the need to have the latest model sitting silently in my back pocket. Cameras are my weakeness and in this digital era I was replacing them as soon as a newer version was available, trypically every 18 months or so. The two I use most often are now nine or ten years old, they've had a lot of use, have had circuit boards and shutters replaced at a cost that would buy a reasonable priced, higher-spec newer model but they are the best cameras I've owned and the newer ones have lost some of the facilities that appealed so much in the models I have.
 

Duncan A

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My first lathe was a Record CL3. Reasonably capable, but I didn't like having to keep an eye on the headstock bearing and oil it regularly (a small thing I know), bedbar bounce (solid bars, unlike some of the cheaper RP's), lack of variable speed, and banjo, headstock, tailstock arrangements that would have been rejected by Noah on the ark. It was a good design 60 years ago but who wants round bedbars nowadays? And it took up a lot of room.
So I bought a nearly new Jet 3520B. It's obviously far more capable than the RP but it also takes up less space and - importantly for me - I find that I'm frequently unaware ot the lathe when I'm focusing on the wood whereas I always had a portion of my attention monitoring the CL3.
In short, because the Jet suits what I do, I feel that I'm turning wood rather than operating a machine and that's what it's all about for me.
Decide what you want to be turning five years from now and buy accordingly.
Duncan
 

Lazurus

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I started with an Axminster 900, a good starter lathe that I used for over a decade as I learned and honed my skills. I always wanted to go bigger and a VB36 came up near to me so I bit the bullet and bought it. I have never regretted it, as above i now rarely notice the lathe, I dont have to worry about capacity limits vibration or power. I just turn, it was a huge leap, but with huge benefits, if you are serious about upgrading, go much bigger or the benefits may be minimal.
 

Sachakins

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......Usually it is only when everyone else in the house shouts at me - "Just buy it and stop torturing us all with the pros and cons!"

I'm not a turner, because I am scared of the addiction possibilities - it's on the list of things to do, but not yet...you need to give in to your addiction, and feed the beast - get the biggest, fastest, most impressive upgrade you can possibly afford, but don't sell the old one - you can never have too many clamps (or lathes)

It will have to go, along with my basic workzone one, no room to have it as second option, but was a good point, thanks.
 

Sachakins

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Distinterior":gi9301m0 said:
Sachakins":gi9301m0 said:
Bit of an off the wall question, but what made you decide to upgrade your lathe.
I have been researching upgrading from my old Record Power DML36SH.
With plenty of help in these forums I had settled on a new a new Coronet Herald.
Suddenly I am not sure, not about the lathe, but is there any gain in upgrading?
Bigger bowls, faster speeds, variable speed control etc etc
I know that's what I'll get,
but will I need it to keep enjoying hobby turning, or,
do I need it to keep enjoying hobby turning?
(Now I have just written that thought down, sounds a bit Zen like statement)

Just wondered what thoughts or jitters you had before upgrading to another lathe, new or used?
I've asked myself the same question on a couple of occasions and, coincidentally, about the same DML36SH lathe....Ive had mine from new for 15 trouble free years and it has met my needs 90% of the time but on the odd occasion I wish it had electronic variable speed, shorter bed bars, was more stable ,had a higher swing and more power....

I have never needed the 36" length for turning anything that long.

The ability to turn larger diameter bowls is the one thing that I really wanted, so I bought the bowl turning extension for mine and it works, but that in turn does highlight the lack of power of the motor & stability of the lathe when I start swinging heavier, out of balance lumps of wood at 90 degrees to the bed bars. The motor does get b l o o d y hot as well.....after an hour or so of turning even a small 200mm dia bowl, the motor is too hot to touch. Still runs fine though.

When I see guys on YouTube turning way out of balance pieces of wood and their Lathes are hardly vibrating at all, ...it does make me think about upgrading.
Yes, the lack of motor grunt is the problem, I have turned outboard upto 15", but is more a chore than enjoyment, and even in board, a 8" dia by 5 to 6" deep was just to awkward and scary, one eye on the piece, one on the headstock, one on the chuck,none on the motor and nose on the smell of the motor and one eye on my exit strategy when it goes wrong.
Not an enjoyable scenario, also could fry bacon and eggs on the motor in under an hour.

Think I've just convinced myself that I need to upgrade to continue enjoying the hobbycand challenging myself, but I wonder if the herald is a big enough step up in size, need to see where more pennies can be found I think!!!
 

Sachakins

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Lonsdale73":bha6mukv said:
I've not long got my lathe. It was the cheaper of two models I'd been considering - a Record Power DML250 - and I was offered it at such a good price I figured that if I didn't take to it then I should be able to recover most of that outlay without losing too much money. It didn't take long before I started thinking "What if..."

I've had two opportunities immediately prior to lockdown to have a go on the dearer model - DML320 - and of course I WANT one of those. Truth is, the DML250 capabilities far outstrip my current abilities. I'm having to glue scraps of wood together to give me something - anything - to practice on, learning how to hold the tools without injury. I still keep eyeing up the 320, seduced by its variable speed and larger bowl capacity despite not having used any more than one speed on the 250 and so farnot even been able to get a bowl blank that's too big for the 250. If Record Power were to offer me one tomorrow then damned right I'd snatch their hand off but for now, I think the cost of upgrading would be better spent on materials and if/when my abilities outstrip my current machine's capabilities then that's maybe the time to consider an upgrade.

In all other areas, I find that if I'm questioning a decision to upgade then I probably don't need to do so. The TV, for example. Mines is around 15 years old but a newer, smarter one would still only show the same channels and the same rubbish programs. Similarly, my phone is six or seven years old now, I hardly ever make or receive calls so don't feel the need to have the latest model sitting silently in my back pocket. Cameras are my weakeness and in this digital era I was replacing them as soon as a newer version was available, trypically every 18 months or so. The two I use most often are now nine or ten years old, they've had a lot of use, have had circuit boards and shutters replaced at a cost that would buy a reasonable priced, higher-spec newer model but they are the best cameras I've owned and the newer ones have lost some of the facilities that appealed so much in the models I have.
I knock up my own blanks using laminated oak/mahogany, having a table saw to rip stock and thicknesses/planer to square up for glueing does make it easier, and can knock out smooth balanced 8" wide boards, and glue these to give 16" wide blanks, of up to 5-6 feet . Making these a lot cheaper than any large blanks I can find.
 

Roland

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Since turning 50, which was a long time ago, my justification rules have changed. Once upon a time it was “do I really need it?”, followed by “is this value for money?”. Nowadays it’s “how many woodworking years have I got left, and would this enhance them?”, followed by ‘how much do I have to spend to avoid buying another one in a few years time?”.
 

Lonsdale73

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Sachakins":2o3yarej said:
Lonsdale73":2o3yarej said:
I've not long got my lathe. It was the cheaper of two models I'd been considering - a Record Power DML250 - and I was offered it at such a good price I figured that if I didn't take to it then I should be able to recover most of that outlay without losing too much money. It didn't take long before I started thinking "What if..."

I've had two opportunities immediately prior to lockdown to have a go on the dearer model - DML320 - and of course I WANT one of those. Truth is, the DML250 capabilities far outstrip my current abilities. I'm having to glue scraps of wood together to give me something - anything - to practice on, learning how to hold the tools without injury. I still keep eyeing up the 320, seduced by its variable speed and larger bowl capacity despite not having used any more than one speed on the 250 and so farnot even been able to get a bowl blank that's too big for the 250. If Record Power were to offer me one tomorrow then damned right I'd snatch their hand off but for now, I think the cost of upgrading would be better spent on materials and if/when my abilities outstrip my current machine's capabilities then that's maybe the time to consider an upgrade.

In all other areas, I find that if I'm questioning a decision to upgade then I probably don't need to do so. The TV, for example. Mines is around 15 years old but a newer, smarter one would still only show the same channels and the same rubbish programs. Similarly, my phone is six or seven years old now, I hardly ever make or receive calls so don't feel the need to have the latest model sitting silently in my back pocket. Cameras are my weakeness and in this digital era I was replacing them as soon as a newer version was available, trypically every 18 months or so. The two I use most often are now nine or ten years old, they've had a lot of use, have had circuit boards and shutters replaced at a cost that would buy a reasonable priced, higher-spec newer model but they are the best cameras I've owned and the newer ones have lost some of the facilities that appealed so much in the models I have.
I knock up my own blanks using laminated oak/mahogany, having a table saw to rip stock and thicknesses/planer to square up for glueing does make it easier, and can knock out smooth balanced 8" wide boards, and glue these to give 16" wide blanks, of up to 5-6 feet . Making these a lot cheaper than any large blanks I can find.
Yeah, I was talking more in the line of bits of leftover B&Q softwood and 18mm plywood. Although I did press a 3" square bit of oak kichen worktop offcut into use
 

TFrench

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I started out with a myford ML8 and quickly found it's limits. Bought a union graduate as a project and was happy with that, until I saw a wadkin RS on gumtree. Now I don't have a graduate any more :D . The roundabout point I'm making is that each one was sold for what I paid or a slight profit (and the wadkin was essentially free). Its worth looking for used machinery - especially as you can quite often get a job lot with tools and chucks that cost a lot if you have to buy new.
 

AJB Temple

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This is very simple. Lots of turning blokes have given answers.

Justification. Entirely unnecessary. If you can afford it and want it then that is sufficient justification, as we only live once and should not regret the things we wish we had done.

The real price is known as the "the shoe/handbag/dress" compromise. You will accept that these things are absolutely essential for your wife, who is also well aware that she is the controller of marital privileges.
 

Terry - Somerset

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Recently upgraded to the Coronet Herald from an Axminster AWVSL 1000, my first lathe.

The Axminster was bought about 6 years ago - no problems, good lathe, but you get what you pay for.

The Record is a revelation - quiet, smooth, proper variable speed (not 10 clunky detents), swivel headstock, reverse capability, spindle lock, better finish. Slow speed helps with out or balance blanks and thread cutting.

As I am just an occassional hobby turner I was not too concerned about a lack of power compared to a bigger machine - you just take lighter cuts and a litte longer.
 

Sideways

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I read the first post and it reminded me of me. You clearly know that you don't need to upgrade.
Whenever I was tempted to spend a lot on something unnecessary and my conscience was pricking me, I used to call my dad and he would talk me out of it in minutes !
 

Sachakins

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Sideways":jqg6hnq0 said:
I read the first post and it reminded me of me. You clearly know that you don't need to upgrade.
Whenever I was tempted to spend a lot on something unnecessary and my conscience was pricking me, I used to call my dad and he would talk me out of it in minutes !
I could try that, but my dad is of the view, don't struggle always get the right tools for the job , so he would say go get it.
 

Sideways

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Sachakins":1i4g9i5b said:
Sideways":1i4g9i5b said:
I read the first post and it reminded me of me. You clearly know that you don't need to upgrade.
Whenever I was tempted to spend a lot on something unnecessary and my conscience was pricking me, I used to call my dad and he would talk me out of it in minutes !
I could try that, but my dad is of the view, don't struggle always get the right tools for the job , so he would say go get it.
Then you're home and dry. You just talked yourself into it :)

But : new one in, old one out. Or you'll soon be overrun with kit and no room to use it properly ...
 

Dalboy

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I would say you have already decided as soon as you put the question up. Justilying it is another matter especially if it is too the other half. :lol: :lol: :lol:

The real question should be which one will it be
 
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