Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

How can I achieve this finish?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Wadef

New member
Joined
5 Jul 2019
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Location
London
I am new to wood working and finishing. I am assembling a kitset clock and want to obtain a finish as in the completed version, shown in red.
C7169613-5FCB-49A1-96B6-A8BB2F9FE989.jpeg

Here is the unfinished wood - I don't know what type it is.
59543EEB-0B6E-43DE-A930-FD0F44D74219.jpeg


I have tried two finishes:
- Johnstone's country walnut stain (too dark)
- Bolgers wood dye light oak (too orange)

Can anyone tell me what I can use to achieve the desired finish?

Thanks
 

Attachments

Trevanion

Greatest Of All Time
Joined
29 Jul 2018
Messages
3,775
Reaction score
569
Location
Pembrokeshire
You could always try thinning out the stains you have on hand with some white spirit (Or whatever is stated on the tin that says it will clean it) to dilute them down to the colour that best matches. Although that finish on the completed piece looks more of an aged timber look rather than a stain, so possibly it's just old and oxidized.

Personally, I would get some Potassium Permanganate Crystals and mix it with about 20 parts or more of water and very sparingly apply it, this will artificially oxidize the timber which might be closer to the look you're going for.

The wood is Beech.
 

Wadef

New member
Joined
5 Jul 2019
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Location
London
Trevanion":2xpsvp12 said:
Personally, I would get some Potassium Permanganate Crystals and mix it with about 20 parts or more of water and very sparingly apply it, this will artificially oxidize the timber which might be closer to the look you're going for.

The wood is Beech.
Thanks I'll try this and see how I get on.
 

Trevanion

Greatest Of All Time
Joined
29 Jul 2018
Messages
3,775
Reaction score
569
Location
Pembrokeshire
Wadef":1zp960hz said:
Trevanion":1zp960hz said:
Personally, I would get some Potassium Permanganate Crystals and mix it with about 20 parts or more of water and very sparingly apply it, this will artificially oxidize the timber which might be closer to the look you're going for.

The wood is Beech.
Thanks I'll try this and see how I get on.
Make sure you wear gloves if you really don't want purple/brown hands! Stuff will stain skin for a while and I'm pretty sure it's similar to what's used in dye packs in banks, don't ask me how I know that.
 

Wadef

New member
Joined
5 Jul 2019
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Location
London
Some success - I got some beech to test on and managed to find a chemist which sold potassium permanganate. With one heavy coat the colour is similar to what I want, and far closer than any other attempt.
6A4C44B8-4C22-4088-929D-2D9D8B1ACBC2.jpeg

It is however fairly dull or washed out in appearance. Is there anything I can do to add lustre to it?
 

Attachments

Trevanion

Greatest Of All Time
Joined
29 Jul 2018
Messages
3,775
Reaction score
569
Location
Pembrokeshire
Wadef":29p6ecy8 said:
It is however fairly dull or washed out in appearance. Is there anything I can do to add lustre to it?
Some shellac sanding sealer with a wax overcoat perhaps? Or just wax applied on, then buffed looks very good on beech.

Looks like you got the mix spot on too, sometimes it can leave a purple hue if there's too much PP.
 

Wadef

New member
Joined
5 Jul 2019
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Location
London
Trevanion":281m4ev0 said:
Looks like you got the mix spot on too, sometimes it can leave a purple hue if there's too much PP.
That would be thanks to the chemist who figured out the pill to water ratio based on your 20 parts to one advice.

Will try wax, thanks.
 
Top