Hogmanay gifts and questions about dining chairs

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woodbrains

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Paddy Roxburgh":279icgn4 said:
Are these the chairs from the Alan Peters book?
http://www.craftscouncil.org.uk/article ... an-peters/

Hello,

Yes, that is the one, though the seat pad on that is horrible. They have nice, backside contoured seats, that are very comfy and don't actually need a pad, though if you wanted to, a thin floppy cushion is all that is needed.

What do you think, is it your/his taste?

Oh, it doesn't really show on that photo, but the back slats are bent under tension to give lumbar support. Peter's did a fantastic design actually, light, strong and comfy dining chairs that are easy enough to batch produce.... Genius.

Mike.
 

xy mosian

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lurker":1f0x27kd said:
Those are really nice. I'm sure the legs are a traditional design but I can see them getting snapped off
phil.p":1f0x27kd said:
Straight through the seat and wedged - they'd take some snapping off, I would think.

Absolutely right phil. minimum diameter of legs 30mm, taper tenoned into 50mm seat. I think/hope they'll last. Regular use for fouteen months I am begining to get confident.
xy
 

custard

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Paddy Roxburgh":u87snfyy said:
So as far as the rake is concerned, if the back is curved how does one measure the rake? Is it the angle of a straight line drawn from the seat to the top? Or is there some other way to calculate it?

A curve in a chair back is effectively acting as a lumbar support, if you like it's a wooden version of the cushion we place in the small of our backs when sitting down. To calculate the rake imagine that lumbar support curve wasn't there, then in your mind's eye measure the angle of the remaining back.
 

woodbrains

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custard":1g5z6tlp said:
Paddy Roxburgh":1g5z6tlp said:
So as far as the rake is concerned, if the back is curved how does one measure the rake? Is it the angle of a straight line drawn from the seat to the top? Or is there some other way to calculate it?

A curve in a chair back is effectively acting as a lumbar support, if you like it's a wooden version of the cushion we place in the small of our backs when sitting down. To calculate the rake imagine that lumbar support curve wasn't there, then in your mind's eye measure the angle of the remaining back.


Hello,

The beauty of the Alan Peter's chair is, the lumbar support is established after the chair is made. I would still mock one up before I started to make the set, but the back slats can be set up, tested for comfort, re jigged as many times as you like to get it just right. You don't have to deconstruct the entire chair every time you want to make a subtle change in form to get it right.

Mike.
 

custard

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Beau":2ozhdb5q said:
Anyone know how he fixed the slats on?

Alan Peters used Ebony pins. I suggested, as a boat builder, the OP could personalise it by using copper roves, maybe call it the "clinker chair"!
 

Beau

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custard":3b56pyo3 said:
Beau":3b56pyo3 said:
Anyone know how he fixed the slats on?

Alan Peters used Ebony pins. I suggested, as a boat builder, the OP could personalise it by using copper roves, maybe call it the "clinker chair"!

Thanks


Would look good with copper roves.

Think there was furniture maker making a name for himself some years back who used them widely on his furniture. Cant remember the name but he had come from boatbuilding.
 

Racers

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These are my chairs



And all the parts



No angled joints every thing cut with templates and a router, apart for the through mortices in the front rail.

Round the table.



Must take some better pictures!

Pete
 
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