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High Torque Cordless Drill

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Mrs C

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Any recommendations for a high torque cordless drill that doesn’t cost a fortune?
 

Nelsun

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The Makita DHP481 will turn the world (115Nm) and can be had bare for 145ish new if you have the batteries already. I've been meaning to list mine in the classifieds due to jumping on their 40v battery offer if that tickles your fancy.
 

sammy.se

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I have the Makita DHP481 and it's brilliant
However, since I bought an impact driver, I've found the high torque needs for my drill have gone down.

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lurker

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sammy.se":3l0txzcp said:
I have the Makita DHP481 and it's brilliant
However, since I bought an impact driver, I've found the high torque needs for my drill have gone down.

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I too have recently aquired an impact driver. Wish I had bought one long ago.
 

sunnybob

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Nelsun":1vz3enxn said:
The Makita DHP481 will turn the world (115Nm) and can be had bare for 145ish new if you have the batteries already. I've been meaning to list mine in the classifieds due to jumping on their 40v battery offer if that tickles your fancy.
I had a 1500 cc motorcycle that only just matched that torque :shock: :shock:
 

sunnybob

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Phil Pascoe":1in7u3ij said:
Mine was 167Nm. :lol:
It was a V twin low revving cruiser, but it could pull well over a half ton pretty smartish. 8)
 

AJB Temple

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I'm curious. It's hard to imagine why high torque would be a pre-requisite in a cordless drill. Are you sure you need this? The disadvantage is weight, and when the drill grabs it takes your arm with it.

High torque applications like driving big core bits (for cutting holes in walls etc) are best done with an SDS cabled drill, and things like driving big Augers into deep hard wood (eg framing) are also best done with a cabled drill in my experience.

For doing things like driving in timber fix bolts, an impact driver or the oil driven equivalent beats a drill hands down.

My cordless is a Milwaukee 18v Fuel with 5aH battery. It's never let me down. I suspect most good quality cordless drills are much of a muchness in practice and purchases are driven by the battery systems we have.
 

Nelsun

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Phil Pascoe":2zgec3di said:
I've spoken to a few tradesmen lately who have all said the new DeWalt stuff is better than Makita.
I don't buy into that as both have their strong and weak points e.g. DeWalt stands, table saws and nailers (although Milwaukee and Hikoki appear better yet) are streets ahead of Makita, but drills, impacts and circ saws... not so much. It's horses for courses really.
 

Phil Pascoe

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They were using drills, impact drivers and circular saws - roofing. They had changed over from Makita.
They said a few years ago Makita was better, but now DeWalt is superior by a mile. (I must admit to being biased against Makita due to the total absense of customer care. :D )
 

Nelsun

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AJB Temple":3jj7rpq2 said:
I'm curious. It's hard to imagine why high torque would be a pre-requisite in a cordless drill. Are you sure you need this? The disadvantage is weight, and when the drill grabs it takes your arm with it.
I'll no guess at the application but, if grabbing is an issue, there's a few cordless drills around that have fancy dohickies (besides big side handles!) onboard to try and prevent the operators arms and wrists swapping sides - a sudden stop in rotation and a gyroscope sensor picking up a rapid rotational shift I think is how it works.

IIRC, Metabo have one and Makita's new 40v certainly has it. I'm sure DeWalt do too, Phil :p As someone with a gammy wrist it was a big enough pull to get one. I've yet to experience how well it works... welll, I hope.
 

AJB Temple

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Thanks. I was unaware of that feature. I find for things where I require serious torque, a cordless tool is not powerful enough but I have not tried the 40v offerings.
 

sammy.se

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I was aware of that feature on SDS drill, they call it a clutch. My Makita cordless driver does NOT have that feature, as my wrist will attest.

Maybe they have since added it.

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Mrs C

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Trevanion":3qgstw3a said:
Got any more idea of what you plan on using the ‘high torque’ drill for?
Sorry, should have said. For putting hinges, holes etc. into field gate posts where it’s too far from the house to run a cable.

Thanks
 

Nelsun

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sammy.se":wea51xp4 said:
I was aware of that feature on SDS drill, they call it a clutch. My Makita cordless driver does NOT have that feature, as my wrist will attest.

Maybe they have since added it.

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It's only just been added to their very latest drill: the HP001G. The only clip I've seen of it doing its thing is 5:40 in to this video of some poor guy endlessly drilling holes with one.

https://youtu.be/Q6ij9ScuoVc?t=340
 

Yojevol

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Nelsun":3soqw2d6 said:
sammy.se":3soqw2d6 said:
I was aware of that feature on SDS drill, they call it a clutch. My Makita cordless driver does NOT have that feature, as my wrist will attest.

Maybe they have since added it.

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
It's only just been added to their very latest drill: the HP001G. The only clip I've seen of it doing its thing is 5:40 in to this video of some poor guy endlessly drilling holes with one.

https://youtu.be/Q6ij9ScuoVc?t=340
I see that this drill has a pretty substantial side handle. Just a thought but this could be extended in some way so that an assistant could take all the torque load.
 

sammy.se

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Mrs C":20shqtx0 said:
Trevanion":20shqtx0 said:
Got any more idea of what you plan on using the ‘high torque’ drill for?
Sorry, should have said. For putting hinges, holes etc. into field gate posts where it’s too far from the house to run a cable.

Thanks
That high torque Makita will be very adequate. I've used it to make holes in joists using an auger bit and it went through like butter.

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Trevanion

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Look, I'm not a neanderthal or anything like some other people... but if you're not in a serious hurry you can't really beat a bit and brace with a largish sweep for that kind of work and it won't cost you the earth either, maybe £15 at most all in buying secondhand stuff off eBay. That's coming from me and I'm a machine man through and through.

Pretty much any of the higher-end drills of the tool manufacturers line-up will do the job, it mostly depends on what colour you prefer although I do think the Dewalt stuff is better built than Makita these days.
 
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