Help with external door/gate

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Jonathan S

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Jacob":21d5q47a said:
Jonathan S":21d5q47a said:
+1 for water based paint!
I use Renner, its guaranteed for 10 years, my present home has windows I made 14 years ago and painted with Renner.....there still no break down of the paint.

Do what Mike says and use Bedec!!

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OK I take your word for it, but my experience and a lot of other peoples seems to be that modern paints fail within a few years, sometimes disastrously with water trapped and causing rot behind the otherwise perfect surface film. Hence the wide use of preservatives.
Linseed oil paints don't deteriorate in the same way. I have some windows painted 11 years ago which are now in need of a top up next spring, but the wood should be in perfect nick, though preservative free.
I think the water based paints you buy from the paint shop are designed to fail so as to keep the painting trade in constant work.....not sure about Bedec but I know Renner is not readily available to the average painter, its generally sold to the manufacturing industry.

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Ed Turtle

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I'll see what i can find when i come to paint, i might even just oil the door if the wood looks nice enough. Going to look at the wood in a few days, can anyone give some advice regarding the dimensions?

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MikeG.

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Jeez, Jacob, did you really say that? If you don't know about products, not commenting would be the responsible course of action. There's a damn good reason no-one takes any notice of you. In my previous house I fitted timber windows sprayed with a water-based flexible micro-porous paint that didn't require any attention whatever even after 16 years, including the south facing ones. Bedec is the nearest the public can buy in a tin to those factory finishes. I have been specifying Bedec for at least 12 years and have never had a single negative comment from any client. I am not the only architect who thinks that the stuff is an absolute godsend, and the end of our finish-specifying problems.
 

Brandlin

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Hi Mike.... Not heard of BEDEC before, but sounds like a product i want to use on my summershed* The BEDEC data sheet suggests that all pressure treated timber should be allowed to weather for 6 months prior to application of the paint. Is this something you have experience with?


*I need a shed, SWMBO wants a summer house - we compromised... I'm building a summerhouse and I may be allowed to put some shed stuff in there.
 

ColeyS1

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It absolutely does need to weather and gray first. I made some raised beds from pressure treated timber. The posts were 4 inch square and I took a punt and thought I'm sure the bedec will be fine on the new treated timber. It was completely fine but after a few months started peeling off. Luckily I'd only painted the corner posts and not the rest of it.

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MikeG.

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Brandlin":3b55qhao said:
Hi Mike.... Not heard of BEDEC before, but sounds like a product i want to use on my summershed* The BEDEC data sheet suggests that all pressure treated timber should be allowed to weather for 6 months prior to application of the paint. Is this something you have experience with?.........

Careful here. Which Bedec product were you looking at? MSP (Multi-Surface Paint) is the stuff to use with planed timber such as for the proposed gate in the OP. Barn Paint is the thinner stuff to be used with sawn timber, but not suitable for planed timber. As to your question....

..........I've ignored that advice in the Data Sheet for decades, and never had any issues. The other thing I ignore is the thinning down advice, because I apply the first two coats a good bit thinner than they suggest. It's always worked beautifully for me.........but I wouldn't suggest for a second that anyone does anything other than follow the Data Sheet. When I specify it on drawings I always say "to manufacturer's instructions", so this is a classic example of do-as-I-say-not-do-as-I-do. :D
 

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