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devonwoody

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Our daughter has made a request for the quilt stand pictured below.

Can anyone please advise how to proceed with joints at the bottom legs area. Also a drawing if possible.
I would like to addon the timber at the leg extension to avoid using wide pieces of timber.
Most probably use second had pine in keeping with quilt tradition.



Many thanks in anticipation :roll:
 

Jorden

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Hi DW

Why don't you make the legs and cross stretchers on each side out of one piece of timber, a little wide maybe, but not very long, then do a full width tenon between the uprights and the leg section with a peg tenon through it for the long stretchers.

Dennis
 

devonwoody

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Jorden":6jkxmzhr said:
Hi DW

Why don't you make the legs and cross stretchers on each side out of one piece of timber, a little wide maybe, but not very long, then do a full width tenon between the uprights and the leg section with a peg tenon through it for the long stretchers.

Dennis
OK Dennis, I've got some 8 and 6 x2" construction timber.
What do you mean by a peg tenon on the long stretchers, "stub tenon"? perhaps.
 

devonwoody

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Jorden, I have been pondering over your suggestion and come to the conclusion that the timber would most probably need a lamination because of the short grain crossing through the legs.
Do you agree or perhaps dowel run up the leg area might give some strength to that area.
 

Jorden

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Hi DW

What I mean by a peg tenon is one that is considerably smaller than both the width and thickness of the board and so resembling a square peg set into the end grain. The peg then goes into the side of the previously assembled end section mortice joining the feet and the uprights, doubling at a peg to hold the first mortice together. It's probably easiest to think of it as a pegged tenon, except you are using another tenon instead of a dowel. I've used this joint a few times and found it works very well, my main tip with it is to let the first tenon dry before cutting the second :wink:

It's difficult to see from the picture what the angle of the legs are, but they do look very flat, so short grain wouldn't be a problem. If you are using construction timber, it may become a problem as softwood won't be as happy in this design as a hardwood would - it looks in the picture that the origonal was beech.

You have the option of making the bottom rail and legs out of one piece of timber as discussed, or turning the joint around and making each upright and a leg out of a single piece. What I don't think will work is to make up a frame then add the legs to it as the loads it may be asked to support would cause the leg to sheer off.

Hope that helps :)

Dennis
 

devonwoody

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Thanks Dennis,
Your advice and suggestions were much appreciated. The tenons will be given a shot and legs are now definitely going to be one piece across the frame, might still laminate see what the feeling is after cutting.

Starting later today unless my new toys arrive early this week then things could go haywire for a couple of weeks. (tspp250 & ba 350 coming)
 
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