Help regarding doors please.

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bluenose

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Hello folks, I am in the process of replacing all of the doors around my home.

There are two doors that will require some additional work on them. One of the doors is only about 3/4's of the normal door height and the other is where the top of the door is very angled.

I have (hopefully) attached a couple of images so that you can see what I am trying to achieve. The thought in my mind is to cut the two doors to suit/fit their apertures and then with my router I intend to route a new groove to match the originals and then to fill the grooves that are no longer required. I'm thinking that I can do this with a decent quality woodfiller (any recommendations very welcome) and then to sand this down so that after painting the work will not be visible.
The grooves in the new doors can I think be described as being flat bottomed 'V's, I'm sure that many of you will know what I mean, indeed some of you probably have them installed in your own homes. They are I believe quite popular. If anyone is aware of where I might obtain a suitable router bit, is it possible that such a bit will be available?

Please excuse the poor quality drawing but i think that it just about serves its purpose!

Any help/guidance will be much appreciated. Thank you.
 

Attachments

  • Angled door.jpg
    Angled door.jpg
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  • Door reshaping.pdf
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  • New style door.jpg
    New style door.jpg
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MARK.B.

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Are you going with solid timber doors or the cheaper hollow / honeycomb core , with solid you might be able to get an acceptable finish :unsure: but my own albeit limited use of hollow doors would say that you will find it a frustrating and soul destroying task ,especially at that angle cutting through the inset panel.:) others may have a solution and i for one would love to know it (y)
 

Ollie78

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I had to chuckle at the 6 panel with the angled cut, absolutely mental.

If I were you I would either just make doors to fit from proper wood or maybe use solid fire door blanks and router the grooves in to that.
If you don`t "need" the T and G look just go for a solid plain firedoor for the angled one, it will be much more recessive if its just flat.
Another way would be to just frame the opening square, plaster the top in and have a short but square door in there.

Ollie
 

Jameshow

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I had to chuckle at the 6 panel with the angled cut, absolutely mental.

If I were you I would either just make doors to fit from proper wood or maybe use solid fire door blanks and router the grooves in to that.
If you don`t "need" the T and G look just go for a solid plain firedoor for the angled one, it will be much more recessive if its just flat.
Another way would be to just frame the opening square, plaster the top in and have a short but square door in there.

Ollie
Hey I put that door in ... Don't mock!🤣🤣🤣
 

Orraloon

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How about 32mm water resistant MDF. Cut to fit opening and its an instant door. You can rout grooves if you like. I saw this done at an office refit a few years ago.
Regards
John
 

Droogs

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I have to replace 5 doors in our flat over the course of this year as each room gets redecorated after having new floors joists and floors fitted. As we also replaced the early Victorian plumbing and fitted Ch, I am going to make my doors out of MRMDF with solid lipping and veneer of the wood we want on show (Elm, Rippled Sycamore and Oak). We're not into painted architrave and doors etc. The doors will be made with loose panels, styles and rails using loose tenons for assembly. This will allow me to have oak finish on one side and the sycamore one the other.
 

Bristol_Rob

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Hey I put that door in ... Don't mock!🤣🤣🤣
That looks proper odd 🤣

Notwithstanding that, I did the same with a flat faced fire door (fd30) and had fun with the top corner. You have to splay that leading edge in an interesting way to enable it to close and look right.

If you really want a panelled door in that shape you could consider adding a rail to the sloping side to show intention. But I think that would mean building a new one from scratch 🤷‍♂️
 

Spectric

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I would say that angled door is under the stairs, but not the right choice of door because it looks like a bodge. If this was my problem then I would treat the angled door as a one off, but keep it in a similar style to all the others. Also you will find the door manufacturers state the maximum that can be trimmed off the door, with Deanta it was 15mm from each side and therefore you would need a proper solid door. Some of the door firms do say they can make custom sizes, not sure if that applies to angled doors though but maybe another option.
 

Doug71

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That 6 panel door cut at an angle is brilliant! 🤣 🤣 🤣

As suggested use a door blank for the angled one, put some v grooves in if you want it to match.

For the shorter 3/4 height door just cut it off the bottom. Only problem might be if they are hollow core and have a lock block in as this might end up at the wrong height :dunno:
 

thetyreman

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one thing I would seriously consider is buying a solidcore FD30 firedoor blank, and cut it to size, they aren't as sexy as the shoite hollow core doors you get in all homes now but it'll be far more solid and reliable, other than that make a custom door for it, frame and panel style.
 

xy mosian

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On hollow doors, the manufacturers maximum recommended trim is generally to save breaching the solid wood edge. Or leaving virtually nothing for screws to bite into. A hollow door can be cut to any size, however at some point the solid wood inner frame will be lost, door cut in half for example. When this happens replacing the solid timber inner edge is just a matter of glueing in a suitably sized piece of wood. The only real snag is that the core material, often just card, may be glued to the inner surface of the skins with a glue which leaves a bulky residue when cut away. If this is carefully removed, generally working by hand with a knife or chisel, then fitting the solid edge is a relatively easy task.
The panelled door may have its 'pattern' pressed in. If that is the case then routing new grooves will likely end in needing a new door. See answers above.
geoff
 

bluenose

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Well thanks for all the replies chaps, much appreciated. It looks as though the answer is going to be to purchase some MDF and make myself a door and get the router out again.
Anyone know if I can get a router bit that has a flat bottom with angled sides?
 

okeydokey

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In the original post the "door" said to be angled is I suspect a normal door, but the frame isn't square at the top, so just trim the door top to the same profile as the frame.

I had a similar issue to the above (but a hollow door where I couldn't cut off enough at the top to trim to the same profile as the frame) and solved mine by cutting a piece of wood the same width as the existing door shut and after scraping the paint off the top of the frame glued in place with ordinary pva and longish panel pins to hold in situ - then when all dry remove the pins fill wherever needed and primer/paint a few coats and the end result should be good. If you look hard, you will see still see the insert but do folks really look hard at doors when they are shut?
 

bluenose

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In the original post the "door" said to be angled is I suspect a normal door, but the frame isn't square at the top, so just trim the door top to the same profile as the frame.

I had a similar issue to the above (but a hollow door where I couldn't cut off enough at the top to trim to the same profile as the frame) and solved mine by cutting a piece of wood the same width as the existing door shut and after scraping the paint off the top of the frame glued in place with ordinary pva and longish panel pins to hold in situ - then when all dry remove the pins fill wherever needed and primer/paint a few coats and the end result should be good. If you look hard, you will see still see the insert but do folks really look hard at doors when they are shut?
Yes it is a normal door but the angled part butts up to the ceiling, the room that it is fitted in has been built in the roof of a bungalow.
 

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