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Hardwearing finish for garden tool handles?

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nev

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Title says it all really :shock: , what are my choices for a good looking, long lasting finish on small garden hand tool handles?
probably ash, walnut, sycamore, maybe oak or some random exotic :?
 

CHJ

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Two or three coats of Hard Wax Oil would probably stand up as good as most.
 

cornucopia

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I test allot of finish's both in my day job and to with woodturning and by far the best I’ve found so far is the woodoc range

the interior woodoc 5- 10 and 20 will stand up to being left outside for about 3 months or so- so if the tools are put away wet or accidently left out overnight they'll be fine.

I haven’t tested the exterior 30 and 50 yet but if there as good as the interior range with the added benefit of uv inhibitors etc they should be brilliant all year round exterior products

available from either
woodoc uk main site -- or online shop
or
phil irons
 

Neil Farrer

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nev":o1xdokoc said:
Title says it all really :shock: , what are my choices for a good looking, long lasting finish on small garden hand tool handles?
probably ash, walnut, sycamore, maybe oak or some random exotic :?
If you are making handles for garden tools to be used, that will get dented, dropped, damaged etc then no oils or wood turning finishes are appropriate. You need to thoroughly seal the surface. Its got to be what we used to coat yachts with - marine varnish, five coats starting 20/80 varnish/spiirit, 40/60 - 60/40 80/40 and a final full power coat. Rub it lightly with wet and dry in between.
 

Phil Pascoe

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Why surface treat them? Soak them in a decent preservative and have done with it. If you put a heavy varnish on them it'll look lovely if you're selling them, then they will give the user blisters (experienced gardeners will know this). Don't use non durable woods such as ash and sycamore for anything that is likely to be left out doors- they'll rot while you look at them.
 

tekno.mage

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I'd go with several coats of a Hardwax oil, like Chestnut or Osmo (Osmo make an external grade one). I've used this on various axe and tool handles and it performs well - and doesn't give the user (me!) blisters in use like some lacquers can. Yes, it will get abraded away in use eventually (like any finish) but it doesn't flake or crack and can be re-applied over any badly damaged areas without having to strip off the remnants of the previous coats.
 

nev

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cheers guys and gurls, i suppose i should have emphasised small :oops:
imagine a chunky pen that would permanently live in the shed or greenhouse, that may get grubby or damp at times. so no worries about blisters etc.

the hardwax oil from chestnut looks like it could be ideal -easy to apply, satin sheen to gloss and hardwearing.

would a CA/BLO finish withstand living in a shed?
 
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