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WonderWoman

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Is sycamore easy to saw using a hand saw?One of those that look like a D shape, metal round bit with a detatchable blade.

Thanks
 

devonwoody

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)No wonderwoman.

You WIMHO need to go for at least a jig saw, fretsaw or bandsaw for type of work you last mentioned.
(you most probably could do with a wonderman around :wink: )
 

WonderWoman

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Grr, I hate being a weak and feeble woman.
Im really just trying to find ways of doing work myself rather than other people, so its quicker and easier(im very impatient).
Luckily someone here has offered to see if they can achieve the shapes I need so at least there is a glimpse of hope in my drawn out struggle.
Thanks for the info.
 

Alf

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WW,

Presumably to saw a shape out of a flat board, yep? The D-shape with a detachable blade could be a coping saw? If the required shapes are small, it could be done, but they're not always the easiest of tools to use. The bowsaw, which is capable of tackling bigger work, is a bit easier to use in my experience. Easier still would be a powered fret or scrollsaw, but Gill's your woman to advise on that.

Take no notice of DW and his old fashioned views that you need a bloke about to help. They just get in the way. :roll: Nothing to stop you doing the job yourself, if you fancy to take a crack at it.

Cheers, Alf (also a weak and feeble woman, but only when it's convenient... :wink:)
 

DaveL

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Alf":hdmvu2o7 said:
Alf (also a weak and feeble woman, but only when it's convenient... :wink:)
Who pushes large lumps of iron along defenceless bits of wood for the fun of it. :roll:
 

WonderWoman

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Gentlemen gentlemen, please dont argue.

Alf, yep, about 2cm thick flatwood, now I know that saw is a coping saw itl be easier to find if i get one.
Im assuming the circular holes can be made by just drilling through but its the rectangle thats the toughy.
 

Gill

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Hi WW

Dunno where Devonwoody has got the idea that sycamore's hard to cut and that you need a bloke to do it for you. I wonder if the old rascal's on the make ;) .

You've been talking about making blanks as a commercial enterprise. It wouldn't be viable to cut them by hand with either a coping or fret saw for the following reasons:

It's difficult to cut quickly, and
It's difficult to cut accurately, and
It's difficult to cut in a straight line.

I'm not sure exactly what you're trying to cut, but these links may give you some idea of what a powered scroll (fret) saw can produce:

Beatles portrait(cut out of sycamore... hint!)
Trinket Box
Picture frame
House plaque

It's got to be said that cutting straight lines with scroll saw is a challenge. If you think this will be important to you, it would be worth considering a bandsaw because they can cut straight lines accurately enough for what I should imagine you'll need, yet fitting a thinner blade will allow a degree of freehand curve cutting.

A saw such as the Delta 40540would probably be a good scroll saw to get started with. Incidentally, you often see scroll saws on eBay; they can be a bit of a gamble because the brands tend to be poor quality, but you do get the odd Hegner or Diamond making appearances. There are others around here who know much more about band saws than me.

I'm waiting for the delivery of a Diamond saw I picked up on eBay myself the other week (apparently, it's with the vendor's courier). If you were to buy this saw brand new it would be awfully expensive but it does have the virtue of being convertable to use a bandsaw blade and a fence, so it effectively gives you two tools for the price of one.

I hope I haven't added to your confusion :) !

Gill
 

Alf

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DaveL":ulskwstb said:
Alf":ulskwstb said:
Alf (also a weak and feeble woman, but only when it's convenient... :wink:)
Who pushes large lumps of iron along defenceless bits of wood for the fun of it. :roll:
:lol: True. Probably 'cos it's never convenient to wait for a bloke to do it for me... :p :wink:

Cheers, Alf
 

WonderWoman

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Thanks for the info.Those pictures were great.
Im a bit wary of spending a fortune on machinery if this is just a passing phase(Im a bit like that)Id be happy to if it was easy to use and I thought i could actually sell what Id like to make from the blanks
 

WonderWoman

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Gill, what I need the wood blanks for is discussed in general woodworking/sourcing wood blanks.
 

Gill

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Hi WW

You're talking about using prefabricated blanks and then cutting shapes in them. If you're just going to be cutting circles, you could use a drill mounted in a stand with large circle cutting bits. However, if you want to cut out other shapes (such as rectangles) a scrollsaw is what you'll need.

If you want to make your own blanks (it'll be much cheaper than buying them), then you should be thinking about either a bandsaw or a tablesaw in addition. However, that's probably looking a long way into the future.

Whichever way you go, you'll have to acquire a drill which can be mounted in a stand, either to drill big holes or to drill fine holes through which you can insert your fretwork blades. If you're going to drill big holes, get a big drill - if you're going to cut fine holes, it's worth considering a small multi-tool such as a Proxxon or Dremel.

Gill
 

WonderWoman

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At the weekend I was talking to a guy Ive known for ages and it suddenly dawned on me that he has his own woodwork room in his garden.I asked him if he could drill some holes for me and he said yes, and for the rectangular hole he says he has a square drill(!!)
So my plan is to buy the blanks then ask him to cut out the bits for me.Hoooooorah!!
 

Johnboy

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Wonderwoman wrote
and for the rectangular hole he says he has a square drill(!!)
Where does he keep these? Next to the skyhooks in the drawer containing the left handed screwdrivers and spots for the spotwelder? :lol:

John
 

WonderWoman

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Above the glass hammer and to the right of the chocolate teapot.

Are you saying he is fibbing?
 

Johnboy

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Fibbing, as if a man would do that :whistle:

Seriously though, you cant drill square holes with something that rotates. If he is not taking the mickey then he may have a morticing machine which can "drill" square holes. It has a hollow square chisel with a drill bit inside it. It is plunged into the wood with the drill removing most of the waste with the chisel squaring it up.

John
 

Adam

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Sure he doesn't mean a morticer? Or a router in a jig? Either of those would cut "rectangular or square" holes.

I'd describe a morticer as cutting square holes.

Its basically a round drill bit inside a "square" chisel, the tips drag the wood into the drill bit, and then are extracted using a normal flute.



Or a slightly better picture



Adam
 

devonwoody

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He aint drilling square holes with a drill thats for certain. :D :D :D

Perhaps he is using a morticer on a pillar drill chaps?

Better ask you mum :wink:
 
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