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Hand Planing ?

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Learner Les

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I have 2 pieces of timber 36 inches long x approx 3.5 inch, that I wish to plane to 3 inch square. I would like to hand plane (stop grinning Alf!) but my planing skills are very poor :oops: . What size/type of plane do I need and any tips for using it or should I go but a P/T (sorry to even think this Alf).
I know this will drag out the tailed v non-tailed arguments but please play nicely children :)
 

Bean

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Les ! Arguments of tailed v non tailed never :roll:

For hand planing (I'm no expert) but it sounds as if you will want a scrub plane for rapid stock removal, although there's no shame in using a thicknesser to get close and then hand planing (its just the mess they make).

Bean
 

Pete W

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I shall look forward to reading the responses from those who know, but with a confidence born of profound ignorance :), I'd be looking for ways to saw the stock closer to 3x3 before I got the planes out.
 

Midnight

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Les... maybe I'm having a blonde moment.. but I canna quite picture the stock you're describing, nor fathom what you want to do with it... 36" long I got... 3.5" wide or thick.?? Plane to 3" square...? is that the desired end section....???
 

Learner Les

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Mike,

The stock is 36 inch long, and approx 3.5 inch square.
They will hopefully be made into plant stand legs, turned on the lathe with square pummels. A woodturner demo that I recently attended, said that it is far easier to square the stock before turning than to square up the pummels afterwards.
 
A

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0.5" is, imho, quite a lot to hog off with a hand-plane (unless you have that nice L-N scrub, eh midnight?) - i'd be inclined to try and take it down to closer to the finished size with a tailed beast, and finish off the last couple mm (if you'll excuse the swap in units!) by hand.

my tuppence worth :)
 

Alf

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Oh I don't know. If you're not used to preparing stock by hand I reckon half an inch could disappear all too quickly... :shock:

Cheers, Alf
 

Learner Les

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The intention was to get closer to size with an electric beast but you hand tool lovers confuse me with talk of #4's, LN's and such like :?
My question is what size and type of plane should I use to finish the stock to size ?
 

Midnight

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<enlightened..

Les..... simple answer is that tool wise, Alf got it right on the money.. though you'll need a good straight edge, a square and something to act as a pair of winding sticks too...

to tackle it... clamp each stick with its flattest face down... and work on the opposite face. To begin with, concentrate on getting that face flat along its length and make sure that it's twist free (hence the winding sticks)...

With one good face, rotate the stick through 90 deg and repeat the process, adding an additional check in that the 2nd face must be square to the first throughout its length...

For best results, it's gonna pay you to take your time, be fussy in getting each face as close to bang on as you can... With 2 good faces that are square to each other, you have a decision to make (provided you have access to the tools)... whether to carry on working by hand, or to mill your stock to a fraction over finished side with a thicknesser... always leave a little material so that you can plane the machined faces to final size...
I won't try to persuade you one way or the other, other than to say that if you choose to machine the last 2 faces, you should allow an additional 4-6" of length to allow for snipe in the faces... if you choose to complete the job using handraulics, you can ignore that...

Completing the job by hand is a simple extension of what you've done so far, working on the next face in sequence, getting it flat, true and twist free while being square to the previous face. The additional step here is that you need to keep planing till you hit your desired thickness...

The only thing you need to mind is that you hone the blade as soon as you feel that the plane's struggling a little.. Other than that.... it's a fine easy job... if a little time consuming...

btw.... what kinda stock are you using...??
 

devonwoody

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Hi Learner Les,

If the furniture van arrives whilst your still doing this you know you should have used a planer/thicknesser.
 

Learner Les

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Thanks for the advice folks. SWMBO has decreed no more expensive toys/tools until I produce something other than sawdust and a kitchen roll holder so the LN, Clifton and P/T options are out :( . A cheaper hand plane (possibly Stanley) will be the weapon of choice. Perhaps I could use this project as a reason to grab a bargain at the Axminster show (if she doesn't come with me) :) .
The timber is Sapele, a wood I have found not to difficult whilst turning, and the finished item was for SWMBO's birthday in 3 weeks time but is now aimed for Xmas !
Thanks again.
 

Alf

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Learner Les":j0vrifwf said:
SWMBO has decreed no more expensive toys/tools until I produce something other than sawdust and a kitchen roll holder so the LN, Clifton and P/T options are out :( .
Haven't mentioned them for a while, but how about a refurbished jobbie from Ray Iles? His site hasn't been updated in eons, but there's no reason to suppose he isn't still doing them, and owners' reviews have been favourable. Better than a new Stanley to be honest. Viz:
The following planes have had their soles and sides reground and they have been re-painted. They have at least 2” remaining on their iron and have a new rosewood handle and knob. A 50% thicker iron can be supplied at an additional cost of £20.00.
LA014 Reconditioned Stanley 4 G+ £55.00
LA015 Reconditioned Stanley 4-1/2 G+ £55.00
LA016 Reconditioned Stanley 5 G+ £41.00
LA017 Reconditioned Stanley 5-1/2 G+ £60.00
LA018 Reconditioned Stanley 6 G+ £75.00
LA019 Reconditioned Stanley 7 G+ £100.0
Cheers, Alf
 
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